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NEWS
September 13, 1988 | United Press International
A London-bound British Airways Lockheed L-1011 carrying 77 people was forced to return to Greater Pittsburgh International Airport Monday night after blowing a turbine in one of its three engines. No injuries were reported.
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NATIONAL
February 5, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
A Seattle energy company received initial regulatory approval Wednesday to build five massive wind turbines floating 16 miles off the Oregon coast. The pilot project off Coos Bay would be the first offshore wind facility on the West Coast. It also would be the biggest demonstration of technology that places floating turbines on platforms in deep water, according to federal officials and executives at Principle Power, the developer. The turbines would be as tall as a 60-story building, vastly larger than typical turbines on land-based wind farms, and able to tap strong ocean winds that blow consistently in southern Oregon, said Kevin Banister, Principle's vice president for business and government affairs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2012 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
Waves at the Wedge are legendary for hurling bodysurfers into the air and sweeping tourists off their feet. But the walls of water that rise up at the end of the Balboa Peninsula in Newport Beach also could serve a far more utilitarian purpose: producing electricity. A pair of Newport Beach entrepreneurs have been testing a wave-powered turbine near the famed bodysurfing spot for years and have now approached city officials for permission to set up a more permanent prototype, possibly off one of the city's two piers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
Andy Granatelli, a flamboyant race car driver turned businessman who became a household name with TV commercials for his STP fuel and oil additives, died Sunday at a Santa Barbara hospital. He was 90. Granatelli died of congestive heart failure, his wife, Dolly, said. Over the course of his career, he was inducted into 19 engineering and motorsport halls of fame, including, in 2002, the hall of fame at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. A natural promoter, he designed and owned cutting-edge cars raced at Indy and marketed his achievements with flair, decking himself and his crew out in pajama-like white suits covered with red STP stickers.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Textron, an East Coast conglomerate that ranks as the nation's 13th-largest defense contractor, made an unsolicited $966-million cash offer Tuesday for Ex-Cell-O Corp., a suburban Detroit manufacturer of automotive parts, aerospace equipment and industrial tools.
NEWS
February 22, 1987
Gas generated by the decomposition of trash at the Puente Hills Landfill is now being used as a fuel to generate enough electricity to serve 70,000 homes, the county Sanitation Districts announced at ceremonies in Hacienda Heights dedicating the landfill's new $28-million power plant. The landfill gas is collected from a system of 142 wells and piped to the plant, where the gas is burned to create steam to turn a steam turbine.
WORLD
August 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Vladimir Putin visited the site of a hydroelectric plant accident in Siberia that killed 47 workers and promised compensation for their families, and those of 28 others still missing. Putin acknowledged that there is little hope anyone could still be alive after four days in near-freezing water. An explosion Monday blew out walls and caused the turbine room at Russia's largest power plant to flood. The cause of the accident is unclear but officials cited a faulty turbine and a rise of pressure in the pipes as possible triggers.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California's Energy Commission approved plans for the state's first hybrid solar-power plant, helping clear the way for construction to begin this year. The 563-megawatt plant will be owned by the city of Victorville and will use a 250-acre array of solar collectors to augment the output of natural-gas-fueled turbine generators.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1987 | Associated Press
General Electric Co. is laying off 1,950 steam turbine and generator production workers in Lynn, Mass., and 200 here in six months, the company said Monday. Spokesman Pat Rocchi said GE planned to hire 350 additional workers in Schenectady in 1988 to replace some of the workers in Lynn. Rocchi said GE would stop making components for commercial turbines and generators at Lynn and would make Schenectady the primary manufacturing center for the parts.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1987
The company said it would lay off 1,950 steam turbine and generator production workers in Lynn, Mass., plus 200 more in six months when it closes a related foundry in Schenectady, N.Y., because of falling demand. Also, General Electric has announced an early retirement plan for 500 workers at a jet engine plant in Ohio. The layoffs are the latest in a series that have reduced GE payrolls by more than 100,000 positions since 1981.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
In the first case of its kind, a large energy company has pleaded guilty to killing birds at its large wind turbine farms in Wyoming and has agreed to pay $1 million as punishment. Duke Energy Renewables -- a subsidiary of the Fortune 250 Duke Energy Corp. -- admitted to violating the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act in connection with the deaths of more than 160 birds, including 14 golden eagles, according to court documents.  The deaths took place between 2009 and 2013 at two Duke sites in Wyoming that have 176 wind turbines, according to court documents.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- Wind-power turbines, which are increasingly dotting California's mountain and desert regions, don't appear to be having a negative effect on home values, according to a new report by the Lawrence-Berkeley National Laboratory. The research, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, analyzed more than 50,000 home sales near 67 wind farms in 27 counties across nine states. "We find no statistical evidence that operating wind turbines has had any measurable impact on home sales prices," said Berkeley's Ben Hoen, the lead author of the study.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2013 | By Catherine Green
Amid reports of wind turbine blades flying off and a resulting flurry of damage control measures, engineering powerhouse Siemens said Monday the chief of its wind power division would step down, two weeks after announcing costs related to incidents in California and Iowa. In a news release, Siemens said Felix Ferlemann, 53, was leaving “by mutual agreement to pursue new career challenges.” Markus Tacke, who had been serving as chief executive of the industrial power business unit within Siemens' energy division, will replace Ferlemann, who became chief executive in October 2011.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Federal wildlife officials on Friday for the first time agreed not to prosecute a developer if an endangered California condor is struck and killed by turbine blades at its proposed wind farm in the Tehachapi Mountains, about 100 miles north of Los Angeles. In granting a right-of-way, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, with approval of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will shield Alta Windpower Development from prosecution if a condor is fatally injured at its 2,300-acre site near the high-desert town of Mojave during the projected 30-year lifetime of the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
MOJAVE, Calif. - Randy Hoyle strode proudly this week along a wind-swept expanse of sand, sage and juniper in the Tehachapi Mountains that will soon bristle with antennas and listening devices designed to protect endangered California condors. As Hoyle explained, the forbidding terrain is the future home of Terra-Gen Power's 2,300-acre Alta Windpower Development - and that project will include equipment to detect incoming condors soon enough to switch off the company's massive wind turbines before they slice into one of the birds.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
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BUSINESS
April 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
General Electric Co. has been awarded a $750-million contract to build a power plant in Japan that will become the world's largest combined-cycle power plant, the company's top executive announced Wednesday. "This is the largest fossil generation order ever for GE," GE Chairman John F. Welch Jr. told shareholders during the company's annual stockholders meeting here. Tokyo Electric Power Co., a privately owned utility, awarded the contract to GE. Once in operation, the combined-cycle power plant will be capable of generating 2,600 megawatts of power--600 megawatts more than the world's largest combined-cycle plant currently in operation, Welch said.
NEWS
November 21, 1987 | Associated Press
The Navy and Marine Corps on Friday grounded dozens of their front-line F-A-18 Hornet fighters because of a problem with General Electric Co. jet engines that power them. The two services said they could not estimate precisely how many of the fighters were being grounded because the "flight restriction" order was directed at engines with a certain amount of wear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2012 | By Mike Reicher, Los Angeles Times
Waves at the Wedge are legendary for hurling bodysurfers into the air and sweeping tourists off their feet. But the walls of water that rise up at the end of the Balboa Peninsula in Newport Beach also could serve a far more utilitarian purpose: producing electricity. A pair of Newport Beach entrepreneurs have been testing a wave-powered turbine near the famed bodysurfing spot for years and have now approached city officials for permission to set up a more permanent prototype, possibly off one of the city's two piers.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
California wants 12 gigawatts of electricity from local clean power sources, such as rooftop solar panels, small wind turbines and fuel cells, by 2020, Gov. Jerry Brown said at a gathering of more than 200 energy experts at UCLA that he convened Monday. Twelve gigawatts is enough to power roughly 3 million homes. But Brown was short on details about the mechanics of reaching that goal. "It's going to take all manner of investment, risk taking and collaboration," he said. At the moment, the state's renewable energy portfolio is laden with large wind and solar farms sprawling over remote deserts and mountains.
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