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NEWS
February 20, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It all seemed so simple at first: Turkey's pro-Western First Lady Semra Ozal, long an influence on Turkish affairs of state, would quietly run for an official ruling party post. Her husband, President Turgut Ozal, could hardly have imagined that this would trigger an unprecedented revolt against him by a "holy alliance" of Islamic conservatives, which threatens not just to split the ruling Motherland Party but to undermine his regional leadership gains from the Persian Gulf crisis.
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NATIONAL
February 18, 2010 | By David G. Savage
Ralph Fertig hardly resembles a terrorist, but the soft-spoken 79-year-old pacifist and human rights activist from Los Angeles might well qualify as one under the government's strong anti-terrorism law. He is the lead plaintiff in a Supreme Court case to be heard next week that will test whether speaking out on behalf of an oppressed foreign minority -- represented by a group that's been deemed a terrorist organization by the U.S. -- can result...
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NEWS
June 21, 1997 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
President Suleyman Demirel on Friday asked a secular opposition leader backed by the armed forces to form Turkey's new government, ending an Islamic party's bid to stay in power until new elections. Mesut Yilmaz, 50, the dour, chain-smoking leader of the center-right Motherland Party, said he expects to form a government by June 30. But his prospects for assembling a parliamentary majority and ending the nation's political crisis are uncertain.
NEWS
April 20, 2002 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nation's top court on Friday barred Turkey's leading Islamist politician from holding a seat in parliament, dashing his hopes of becoming the next prime minister. The ruling--the latest in a string of legal challenges hampering Recep Tayyip Erdogan's bid to govern Turkey--is widely seen as part of a broader campaign led by military leaders and the judiciary to stamp out Islamic political movements in this largely Muslim but officially secular nation.
NEWS
January 10, 1996 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pro-Islamic leader Necmettin Erbakan began trying to form a new Turkish government Tuesday, just as the terrorist slaying of a leading businessman reminded Turks that violence could be the price of growing political uncertainty. "We expect the prayers of our 65 million people . . . will work with the love of faith, night and day, to form a government," Erbakan said after President Suleyman Demirel gave him 45 days to find a coalition partner.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Turkish parliament failed to elect a new president Thursday as disgruntled lawmakers defied party leaders who had endorsed the handpicked candidate of Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit. Ahmet Necdet Sezer, 59, roundly beat 10 other hopefuls, garnering nearly four times as many votes as his closest rival, Nevzat Yalcintas of the Islamic opposition party Virtue.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In December 1978, Turkey's Kahramanmaras province exploded in street fighting between left-wing and right-wing extremists that set the stage for a 1980 military coup and haunted the country for years. Most of the violence was blamed on an ultranationalist paramilitary group, the Gray Wolves. Now, after decades on the fringes of Turkey's turbulent politics, the Gray Wolves have made a leap into the mainstream.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after bringing Abdullah Ocalan home to face trial, Turkey on Wednesday sought to turn the capture of the Kurdish warlord into a demoralizing rout of his cause, sending troops against his insurgents' strongholds in northern Iraq and airing a videotape of the macho orator looking ill, dispirited and barely able to speak.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly everyone in Istanbul, one of the world's fastest-growing and most unruly cities, will tell you that Recep Tayyip Erdogan is doing a better job of managing the chaos than they ever thought possible. Thanks to the 44-year-old mayor, they say, the city is cleaner and greener. Garbage is picked up regularly, trees are being planted, and hard coal has replaced the lignite that once fueled a choking smog. New dams and pipes channel more water to people's homes.
NEWS
May 4, 1999 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The incumbent leftist prime minister, Bulent Ecevit, was asked Monday to form a new government amid renewed tensions between the country's army-backed pro-secular establishment and its embattled Islamist minority. "We will seek to form a government which will work in harmony," said Ecevit, 73, after meeting with Turkish President Suleyman Demirel. Ecevit's Party of the Democratic Left placed first by a small margin in nationwide elections April 18.
NEWS
March 18, 2002 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Being a mayor in southeastern Turkey, where most people are Kurdish, can be tricky. You've got to satisfy the voters' desire to express their ethnic identity more openly, without raising suspicion among Turkish officials that you are encouraging separatism. Last summer, after two years in office here, Emrullah Cin hit upon what he thought was a safe formula: He organized a festival to celebrate the shelengo, a strain of cucumber that, he claims, grows only in Viransehir and requires no water.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | From Associated Press
The nation's top anti-corruption crusader quit the Cabinet and his party Wednesday in protest after he was demoted because of anger over his aggressive campaign against graft. The resignation of Saadettin Tantan, who was interior minister before his demotion, is likely to cast a shadow over the Turkish government's professed determination to fight political corruption.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Turkish stocks dived after a row between the prime minister and president sparked concern over economic reforms that are vital for the country to secure more financial backing from the International Monetary Fund. The National Index of Turkey's 100 largest companies tumbled 1,486 points, or 14.6%, to 8,683 points, the lowest since Dec. 4. Turkey sold one-sixth of its foreign cash reserves to defend the lira as investors offloaded Turkish assets. The country's central bank sold at least $4.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Winding up his service in the Turkish army, Serdar Tanis, a 22-year-old Kurdish conscript, made what appears to have been a fatal error. He decided to set up a branch of the country's main Kurdish political party in his native Silopi in southeastern Turkey. From his faraway barracks near the Bulgarian border, the idea seemed perfectly legitimate.
NEWS
November 6, 2000 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Revelations that a top army general authorized a smear campaign against politicians, journalists and human rights activists have intensified debate in Turkey over the role of the military and have further undermined this nation's already shaky democracy.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Turkish parliament failed to elect a new president Thursday as disgruntled lawmakers defied party leaders who had endorsed the handpicked candidate of Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit. Ahmet Necdet Sezer, 59, roundly beat 10 other hopefuls, garnering nearly four times as many votes as his closest rival, Nevzat Yalcintas of the Islamic opposition party Virtue.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A plan by Prime Minister Mesut Yilmaz to quit later this year to allow early elections plunged the nation back into political turmoil, just as the government was making headway against economic troubles. Senior figures in the coalition slammed an accord Yilmaz reached with an opposition power broker to dissolve the government later this year and set up an interim administration.
NEWS
January 17, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Turkey's highest court dissolved the Islamic-oriented Welfare Party on Friday and banned six of its leaders from politics, accusing them of undermining the country's long tradition of secular rule during a stormy year in government. The decision was a new triumph for the army-led secularist elite that forced Necmettin Erbakan, the Welfare Party leader, to resign as prime minister in June.
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A top judge who is an outspoken advocate of democratic reforms stands to become Turkey's next president after party leaders in parliament unanimously backed his candidacy Tuesday. Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit won the unprecedented all-party support for Ahmet Necdet Sezer to succeed President Suleyman Demirel when Demirel steps down in May.
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