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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1990
It is ironic that some senators and representatives who just two months ago argued for cutting back U.S. military assistance to Turkey, a NATO ally, are now praising that country for its stance against the recent Iraqi aggression. The Turkish Republic took a brave step by cutting off Iraq's oil exports through Turkish ports. They have done so knowing well that the Turkish economy would be hard hit by the loss of $3 billion a year in trade with Turkey's southern neighbor. Turks have angered Iraq's Hussein before.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2012 | By Menelaos Hadjicostis
Reporting from Nicosia, Cyprus -- Rauf Denktash, the former Turkish Cypriot leader whose determined pursuit of a separate state for his people and strong opposition to the divided island's reunification defined a political career spanning six decades, died Friday. He was 87. Denktash, who had a stroke in May, died of multiple organ failure at a hospital in the Turkish Cypriot north of Nicosia, said Dr. Charles Canver, who had treated his heart condition. His death comes in the middle of yet another diplomatic drive to reunify Cyprus, which has been split along ethnic lines since 1974, when Turkey invaded the island in the aftermath of a short-lived coup by supporters of union with Greece.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Osman Ertugrul Osmanoglu, 97, the eldest member of the former Ottoman dynasty, died of kidney failure Sept. 23 at an Istanbul hospital, Turkey's Culture Ministry said. Osmanoglu was the last surviving grandson of an Ottoman sultan and regarded as the head of the living members of the dynasty. Osmanoglu would eventually have become its sultan but for the establishment of the Turkish Republic in 1923 after the collapse of the Ottoman dynasty and the exile of its members to Europe. Osmanoglu moved to New York City in 1933 and was married to Zeynep Tarzi, an exiled member of the Afghan royal family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Osman Ertugrul Osmanoglu, 97, the eldest member of the former Ottoman dynasty, died of kidney failure Sept. 23 at an Istanbul hospital, Turkey's Culture Ministry said. Osmanoglu was the last surviving grandson of an Ottoman sultan and regarded as the head of the living members of the dynasty. Osmanoglu would eventually have become its sultan but for the establishment of the Turkish Republic in 1923 after the collapse of the Ottoman dynasty and the exile of its members to Europe. Osmanoglu moved to New York City in 1933 and was married to Zeynep Tarzi, an exiled member of the Afghan royal family.
NEWS
May 31, 1989
A federal judge in Indianapolis, rejected an attempt by the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus to join a suit seeking to wrest control of four 6th-Century Byzantine mosaic panels from an Indianapolis art dealer. U.S. District Judge James Noland ruled that American law did not recognize the Turkish Cypriot state and rejected its effort to join the Republic of Cyprus and the Greek Orthodox Church of Cyprus in the suit. The two-foot-square mosaics depict Jesus, an angel and Saints James and Mark.
WORLD
December 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
An Istanbul court Thursday fined an author and a journalist for insulting the Turkish state, the latest convictions under a law that European officials say limits freedom of expression and must be changed. Turkey's government has indicated that it has no plans to change the law, under which the country's most famous novelist, Orhan Pamuk, also has been charged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1995
Re "Turks Press Attack on Rebel Kurds in Iraq," March 22: Turkey launched a preventive military operation against Kurdish Workers Party (PKK) terrorist camps after considerable evidence gathered by the Turkish government indicated that the PKK had planned to undertake widespread terrorist activities. The Turkish military operation is aimed only at the PKK. It has nothing to do with the Iraqi-Kurdish groups currently fighting each other. All Turkish forces will be withdrawn from Iraqi territory following the elimination of the terrorists camps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2012 | By Menelaos Hadjicostis
Reporting from Nicosia, Cyprus -- Rauf Denktash, the former Turkish Cypriot leader whose determined pursuit of a separate state for his people and strong opposition to the divided island's reunification defined a political career spanning six decades, died Friday. He was 87. Denktash, who had a stroke in May, died of multiple organ failure at a hospital in the Turkish Cypriot north of Nicosia, said Dr. Charles Canver, who had treated his heart condition. His death comes in the middle of yet another diplomatic drive to reunify Cyprus, which has been split along ethnic lines since 1974, when Turkey invaded the island in the aftermath of a short-lived coup by supporters of union with Greece.
NEWS
October 30, 1994 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The accused--urbane, well coiffed, very rich--drove away from court as usual in luxury sedans. But one recent afternoon, the television cameras stayed. They went home with the $700-a-month state prosecutor, Sudi Gener--on the bus--trying to learn more about this nation's seemingly endemic scandals. Power, money, sex, shots in the night. Glitz and gore enough for a soap opera.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
A bomb exploded outside an apartment building in the Turkish sector of Nicosia early Tuesday, shattering windows but causing no injuries. The explosion occurred just after midnight. Alpay Durduran, an independent deputy in the unicameral Parliament of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, lives in one of the apartments where windows were shattered. He told reporters he did not believe there was a political motive behind the explosion.
WORLD
December 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
An Istanbul court Thursday fined an author and a journalist for insulting the Turkish state, the latest convictions under a law that European officials say limits freedom of expression and must be changed. Turkey's government has indicated that it has no plans to change the law, under which the country's most famous novelist, Orhan Pamuk, also has been charged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1995
Re "Turks Press Attack on Rebel Kurds in Iraq," March 22: Turkey launched a preventive military operation against Kurdish Workers Party (PKK) terrorist camps after considerable evidence gathered by the Turkish government indicated that the PKK had planned to undertake widespread terrorist activities. The Turkish military operation is aimed only at the PKK. It has nothing to do with the Iraqi-Kurdish groups currently fighting each other. All Turkish forces will be withdrawn from Iraqi territory following the elimination of the terrorists camps.
NEWS
October 30, 1994 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The accused--urbane, well coiffed, very rich--drove away from court as usual in luxury sedans. But one recent afternoon, the television cameras stayed. They went home with the $700-a-month state prosecutor, Sudi Gener--on the bus--trying to learn more about this nation's seemingly endemic scandals. Power, money, sex, shots in the night. Glitz and gore enough for a soap opera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1990
It is ironic that some senators and representatives who just two months ago argued for cutting back U.S. military assistance to Turkey, a NATO ally, are now praising that country for its stance against the recent Iraqi aggression. The Turkish Republic took a brave step by cutting off Iraq's oil exports through Turkish ports. They have done so knowing well that the Turkish economy would be hard hit by the loss of $3 billion a year in trade with Turkey's southern neighbor. Turks have angered Iraq's Hussein before.
NEWS
May 31, 1989
A federal judge in Indianapolis, rejected an attempt by the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus to join a suit seeking to wrest control of four 6th-Century Byzantine mosaic panels from an Indianapolis art dealer. U.S. District Judge James Noland ruled that American law did not recognize the Turkish Cypriot state and rejected its effort to join the Republic of Cyprus and the Greek Orthodox Church of Cyprus in the suit. The two-foot-square mosaics depict Jesus, an angel and Saints James and Mark.
NEWS
March 21, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As many as 35,000 Turkish troops backed by tanks and jet fighters launched a three-pronged attack across the undefended border with northern Iraq in pursuit of separatist Kurdish rebels. A government spokesman called it the biggest military operation in the history of the Turkish republic. Turkish jets flew 33 sorties, pounding suspected bases of the rebel Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK, east of the Iraqi border city of Zakhu.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rauf Denktash resigned as president of the breakaway Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus to clear the way for early elections that he said will be a referendum on the divided island's future. Presidential elections will be held April 22 and parliamentary elections May 6. Denktash complained that some Turkish Cypriot politicians have accused him of being too uncompromising in talks on reunifying Cyprus. The latest round of U.N.
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