Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTurtles
IN THE NEWS

Turtles

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
November 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Three dozen rare and endangered sea turtles, among nearly 100 swept ashore in Massachusetts this week, have been flown by the Coast Guard to rehabilitation centers in Florida, said a marine biologist in Sarasota. At least seven turtles died after becoming stranded on Massachusetts' Cape Cod earlier this week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 25, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Two halves of the same turtle's arm bone were discovered almost 200 years apart, according to a new study.  A fossil miracle? Totally. "When two pieces of a fossil fit together, they fit perfectly like a puzzle piece," said Jason Schein, an assistant curator of natural history at the New Jersey State Museum, who was in the room when the two bone halves were first reunited. "We were just kind of dumbfounded. " You can see pictures of the two halves in the gallery above, as well as an artist's rendering of the giant sea turtle (with a human diver for scale)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1998
Your article "Pub Crawling, Brennan's-Style" (by Tracy Johnson, Aug. 13) is offensive and way off the mark. Although turtles are not cute and cuddly, that doesn't mean that they are not abused. Which is exactly what happens every week at Brennan's Pub. In a cruel scenario not mentioned in your article, the turtles are trucked in to the bar in small plastic containers, doused with hot water before the races in order to "give them a little goose" (as their owner recently explained to me with a wink)
TRAVEL
February 7, 2014 | By John Horn
MOUNTAIN PINE RIDGE FOREST RESERVE, Belize - As Hummingbird Highway carves away from Belize's resort-laden sands, pavement dissolves into rutted dirt tracks and the dense jungle canopy starts to press in from all sides. The tallest buildings pushing through the foliage are Maya ruins, and howler monkeys and macaws lurk in the ceiba trees. Late at night, distant thunderstorms ring the horizon, broad sheets of lightning illuminating the mountains. Before I brought my family to Belize for 10 days last summer, I packed a copy of "Heart of Darkness," knowing that although traveling through Central America wouldn't precisely parallel a trip up the Congo River, Joseph Conrad's novel would remind me that the book was the indirect inspiration for our itinerary.
SCIENCE
July 14, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Malaysia is studying a plan to clone leatherback turtles, an endangered species that scientists believe once swam with dinosaurs, an official said Thursday. The Fisheries Department hopes to embark on a leatherback cloning project that could cost $9 million over the next five years, said Director-General Junaidi Che Ayub. The clones could produce hatchlings to boost the population, he said. Some biologists say the plan is impractical and unlikely to succeed.
NEWS
August 2, 1987 | United Press International
Naturalists lined Atlantic beaches on Saturday to guard the "hatching frenzy" of the loggerhead turtle, a threatened species whose eggs were once sold as aphrodisiacs. Scott Peterson, patrolling this island off the southern tip of North Carolina, said at least two nests were due to hatch sometime early today and naturalists would be on hand to make sure the loggerheads safely reached the ocean.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Maybe the most amazing part of a JFK airport story involving turtles on the runway is that the reptiles now have their own Twitter feed, @jfkturtles , with more than 2,800 followers and many witty tweets. To catch up the slowpokes here: About 150 turtles crawled onto the runway at New York City's JFK airport Wednesday morning, delaying flights as crews cleared them from the tarmac. The incident occurred about 6:45 a.m. New York time, an FAA spokesman told Associated Press. This has happened before at JFK. In July 2009, a runway was shut down when about 80 turtles crawled from the bay to the tarmac, a seasonal event linked to their  spawning cycle.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Carla Hall
One of the trickier problems in animal welfare is stopping the illegal sale of underage rabbits, kittens, turtles, birds and other exotic animals on street corners in Los Angeles. The area outside Santee Alley, the popular and densely filled open-air market for all kinds of wares downtown, has also been the venue of choice for vendors trafficking in these animals. The state of California bans the roadside sale of animals. And it's against the law to sell underage animals that are fragile and need special attention or bottle feeding.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Consider the baby sea turtle: Just a few inches long, it emerges from its sandy nest and, using the moon as its compass, runs down the sandy beach away from its many predators and into the relative safety of the ocean surf. The faster these little guys run, the more likely they will survive sea gulls, crabs, snakes, rats and a long list of other animals waiting to eat them. And so, these primarily aquatic animals have developed mechanisms that allow them to move at speeds of several body lengths per second on both sandy and firm terrain.
NEWS
December 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of endangered sea turtles have been found near death, stricken with a mysterious virus that leaves them unable to eat or blink and may be linked to herpes, researchers say. In the last six weeks, 11 loggerheads have been brought into the Turtle Hospital in Marathon, in the Florida Keys. Two of those animals died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The booming illegal international wildlife trade forced conservationists to do the unthinkable Tuesday: Brand the golden domes of two of the rarest tortoises on Earth to reduce their black market value by making it easier for authorities to trace them if stolen. "It's heartbreaking that it's come to this, but it's the right thing to do," Paul Gibbons, managing director of the nonprofit Turtle Conservancy's Behler Chelonian Center in Ventura County, said as he gently placed a 30-pound adult female ploughshare tortoise on a small table.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Carla Hall
One of the trickier problems in animal welfare is stopping the illegal sale of underage rabbits, kittens, turtles, birds and other exotic animals on street corners in Los Angeles. The area outside Santee Alley, the popular and densely filled open-air market for all kinds of wares downtown, has also been the venue of choice for vendors trafficking in these animals. The state of California bans the roadside sale of animals. And it's against the law to sell underage animals that are fragile and need special attention or bottle feeding.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Turtle Bay Resort, the premier hotel along Oahu's North Shore, is nearing completion of a redo of its guest accommodations. All 410 rooms in the main tower of Turtle Bay Resort are getting makeovers -- many are already done -- and completion of the multimillion-dollar project is expected this fall. Guests will find new bedding, fixtures and furnishings in the rooms and remodeled bathrooms that feature walk-in showers as well as new tile and new vanities. Room rates at Turtle Bay Resort vary by date and room style.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Scott Collins
It may be scientifically accurate, but a parents' TV group thinks Fox's raunchy new "Animation Domination Hi-Def" is a long way from funny. The head of the Parents Television Council, an advocacy group that frequently targets network programs it finds unfriendly to families, has written a letter to Fox entertainment Chairman Kevin Reilly blasting the network for "Scientifically Accurate Ninja Turtles" (a very NSFW example can be seen on YouTube...
SCIENCE
May 31, 2013 | By Monte Morin
It's a debate that's left more than a few scientists shell-shocked: Just how did the turtle come to acquire its unique suit of armor? Some have insisted for decades that the turtle's carapace evolved from bony, scale-like growths that developed on the skin of ancient reptiles, similar to the armor found on ankylosaur dinosaurs or armadillos. Another theory, however, argues that the shell is the result of a different transformation. Instead of forming from so-called osteoderms, the shell actually formed when the ribs of certain reptiles began to grow ever broader and straighter, losing their barrel-like curvature.
SCIENCE
May 28, 2013 | By Julie Cart
Federal scientists for the first time have mapped the migration patterns and feeding grounds of Kemp's ridley sea turtle in the Gulf of Mexico, and the study reveals that the favored feeding sites for the endangered turtles overlap with the most-damaged areas of the gulf. Researchers with the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey found that the small turtles predominantly forage in waters where there is extensive commercial fishing, frequent oil spills and a well-known oxygen depletion zone.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | United Press International
Seventy-six cold-stunned sea turtles floating helplessly were plucked Wednesday from the chilly waters off the Canaveral National Seashore, bringing to 232 the number of turtles picked up this week. Sixty-one of the turtles have died. Twenty turtles were en route to Sea World of Florida in Orlando, where 75 were already recovering in tanks of warm water, park curator Frank Murru said. The others were to be trucked to Disney World in Orlando. "Almost all of them are doing very well," Murru said.
WORLD
August 10, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
The bodies of 80 dead turtles washed ashore in Oaxaca, Mexico, last weekend, victims of poachers who eviscerated the animals at sea for their eggs, the Mexican environmental and natural resources ministry said. The bodies of the turtles, some measuring 3 feet long, were found on Escobilla beach, the most important nesting ground for olive ridleys, one of seven species of marine turtles that nest on Mexican beaches.
SCIENCE
May 8, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Marine biologist Dan Madigan stood on a dock in San Diego and considered some freshly caught Pacific bluefin tuna. The fish had managed to swim 5,000 miles from their spawning grounds near Japan to California's shores, only to end up the catch of local fishermen. It was August 2011, five months since a magnitude 9 earthquake and tsunami had struck in Japan, crippling the Fukushima Daiichi power plant. Madigan couldn't stop thinking about pictures he'd seen on TV of Japanese emergency crews dumping radioactive water from the failing reactors into the Pacific Ocean.
SCIENCE
May 3, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has two months to identify suitable in-water nesting and migratory habitat for endangered loggerhead sea turtles, according to a legal settlement filed this week. The agreement - between the wildlife service and the groups Center for Biological Diversity, Turtle Island Restoration Network and Oceana - gives the government until July 1 to propose feeding, breeding and migratory habitat in the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. waters in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|