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March 15, 2009 | Susan Spano
The grapevines of southern Tuscany rest in winter. You see them in soldierly rows around the hill towns of Montepulciano and Montalcino, tethered to stakes like crucifixes, brown, gnarled and seemingly dead. Not so. This dormant time in the life cycle of the grape is the beginning of rich and fruitful life to come, which even winter travelers can appreciate by touring wineries in the hill country about 50 miles southeast of Siena.
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TRAVEL
March 15, 2009 | Susan Spano
The grapevines of southern Tuscany rest in winter. You see them in soldierly rows around the hill towns of Montepulciano and Montalcino, tethered to stakes like crucifixes, brown, gnarled and seemingly dead. Not so. This dormant time in the life cycle of the grape is the beginning of rich and fruitful life to come, which even winter travelers can appreciate by touring wineries in the hill country about 50 miles southeast of Siena.
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TRAVEL
June 22, 2003 | Rossella Brina, Special to The Times
WE were vacationing in Italy -- with Rome, Florence and Venice at our fingertips -- so why did we spend a week sitting on a beach? Basically, because I knew my children, Christopher and Francesca, would embrace the idea. At 8 and 6, what's not to love in a place with an unlimited supply of water and sand? But my husband, Scott, had been hesitant. It was easy to understand why: At the top of his wish list was Rome, a city he had never visited.
TRAVEL
June 22, 2003 | Rossella Brina, Special to The Times
WE were vacationing in Italy -- with Rome, Florence and Venice at our fingertips -- so why did we spend a week sitting on a beach? Basically, because I knew my children, Christopher and Francesca, would embrace the idea. At 8 and 6, what's not to love in a place with an unlimited supply of water and sand? But my husband, Scott, had been hesitant. It was easy to understand why: At the top of his wish list was Rome, a city he had never visited.
TRAVEL
September 22, 1996 | SERGIO ORITZ, Ortiz is a freelance writer based in Malibu
Fall comes swiftly to Tuscany, and you'll know it's arrived when the trees atop this city's ancient wall and along the streets begin shedding their leaves. In a matter of days, the trees will be barren and their branches will look like flimsy, grubby gossamer.
TRAVEL
September 20, 1998 | NANCY SPILLER, Spiller is a Glendale-based freelance writer
Fall in the region of Tuscany is a time of gracious fecundity, when vineyards are heavy with black fruit, plump figs fall from the trees and the forests are filled with porcini mushrooms the size of throw pillows. Honeyed light falls on scarlet-berried bushes and on paths littered with chestnuts glistening like polished lumps of mahogany.
TRAVEL
July 28, 2002 | RAY MOSELEY
The guidebook had let us down badly in the choice of a hotel at Lake Garda, and now we were heading south to Pistoia in Tuscany and certain doom. The next hotel on our itinerary had come from the same wretched book. "This place we're going to is so bad," I joked to my wife, Jennifer, "that the Italian government has tried to house refugees in it and they refuse to go." The decision to visit this less traveled part of Tuscany had been a gamble in more ways than one.
TRAVEL
January 10, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arctic birds, Japanese snow monkeys and a solar eclipse--this could be an interesting year for you, if you take the right tour. For the sixth year, we've asked Ann Waigand, editor of the Educated Traveler newsletter, for a list of the 10 "thinking tours" that she finds most intriguing, of which many are sponsored by museums. Waigand's top 10 for 1999 follow, in calendar order. Note that prices are per person, based on double occupancy. Travelers should be sure they understand which meals and excursions are included (and excluded)
TRAVEL
April 5, 1998 | BRIGITTE BERTROU SELIGMAN, Seligman is a Santa Barbara-based freelance writer
My husband Mischa and I zipped through the undulating Tuscan countryside in our rented apple green Opel. Suddenly in the luminous dusk, the red stone abbey of Monte Olivetto Maggiore soared out of the groves of pine, oaks and olives. After parking the car, we walked up to the monastery, one of Tuscany's most beautifully situated, eager to hear the Benedictine monks' Gregorian vespers, which wafted through the abbey's portal.
FOOD
September 18, 2002
Le Volte is actually the second label of the famed Tuscan estate Ornellaia, which Robert Mondavi has just bought from Marchesi Lucovico Antinori. (His older brother, Piero, runs the Antinori wine estates.) The property is in Bolgheri, close to the Tuscan coast and not far from Sassicaia, the estate which proved it was possible to make great Bordeaux-style wines in this little-known area. This wine, distributed by Mondavi, stains the sides of the glass a deep garnet with violet overtones.
FOOD
October 9, 2002 | S. Irene Virbila
The seat of the Mazzei family since, oh, 1435--produces some killer Tuscan reds. But along with beautiful Chianti Classicos and riservas and its highly sought-after flagship wine, Siepi, the estate makes Poggio alla Badiola from younger vines, in a younger style. This cheerful, juicy wine tasting of earth and berries is almost entirely Sangiovese (94%), with a soupcon of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. It has the soft tannins and silky texture that make for easy drinking.
TRAVEL
July 28, 2002 | RAY MOSELEY
The guidebook had let us down badly in the choice of a hotel at Lake Garda, and now we were heading south to Pistoia in Tuscany and certain doom. The next hotel on our itinerary had come from the same wretched book. "This place we're going to is so bad," I joked to my wife, Jennifer, "that the Italian government has tried to house refugees in it and they refuse to go." The decision to visit this less traveled part of Tuscany had been a gamble in more ways than one.
TRAVEL
January 10, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arctic birds, Japanese snow monkeys and a solar eclipse--this could be an interesting year for you, if you take the right tour. For the sixth year, we've asked Ann Waigand, editor of the Educated Traveler newsletter, for a list of the 10 "thinking tours" that she finds most intriguing, of which many are sponsored by museums. Waigand's top 10 for 1999 follow, in calendar order. Note that prices are per person, based on double occupancy. Travelers should be sure they understand which meals and excursions are included (and excluded)
TRAVEL
September 20, 1998 | NANCY SPILLER, Spiller is a Glendale-based freelance writer
Fall in the region of Tuscany is a time of gracious fecundity, when vineyards are heavy with black fruit, plump figs fall from the trees and the forests are filled with porcini mushrooms the size of throw pillows. Honeyed light falls on scarlet-berried bushes and on paths littered with chestnuts glistening like polished lumps of mahogany.
TRAVEL
April 5, 1998 | BRIGITTE BERTROU SELIGMAN, Seligman is a Santa Barbara-based freelance writer
My husband Mischa and I zipped through the undulating Tuscan countryside in our rented apple green Opel. Suddenly in the luminous dusk, the red stone abbey of Monte Olivetto Maggiore soared out of the groves of pine, oaks and olives. After parking the car, we walked up to the monastery, one of Tuscany's most beautifully situated, eager to hear the Benedictine monks' Gregorian vespers, which wafted through the abbey's portal.
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