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Tustin Marine Corps Air Station

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1985 | Julie Stutts
Col. David L. McEvoy will assume command of the Tustin Marine Corps Air Station from Col. Robert G. Mitchell during a change of command ceremony to be held there Thursday. Mitchell will now become the special projects officer at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station. McEvoy most recently served as community planning and liaison officer at El Toro. Lt. Col. Samuel J. Ware recently assumed command of the Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron-465, Marine Aircraft Group-16, at Tustin Marine Corps Air Station.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2003 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
The Tustin City Council has selected a master planner for the largest parcel of the shuttered Tustin Marine base, capping more than a decade of preparation in the massive redevelopment project, officials said Tuesday. The council voted unanimously Monday evening to grant redevelopment rights on 700 acres of the former military facility to a partnership between Dallas-based home builder Centex Corp. and Walnut-based real estate giant J.F. Shea Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2003 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
Irvine officials promised Tuesday to honor a commitment by Tustin to offer 14 homes at the former Tustin Marine base as temporary housing for poor families. The homes are on an area of the base within Irvine's boundaries. The bulk of the base is in Tustin. The homes, transitional housing, will be operated by Families Forward of Irvine, formerly known as Irvine Temporary Housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2003 | Jean O. Pasco, Times Staff Writer
Irvine officials promised Tuesday to honor a commitment by Tustin to offer 14 homes at the former Tustin Marine base as temporary housing for poor families. The homes are on an area of the base within Irvine's boundaries. The bulk of the base is in Tustin. The homes, transitional housing, will be operated by Families Forward of Irvine, formerly known as Irvine Temporary Housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1989
A Marine who fled the Tustin Marine Corps Air Station by threatening to blow up his car was identified Thursday as Lance Cpl. Kevin J. Hurley, 19, of Idaho Falls, Ida. Hurley has been missing since Tuesday. Marine Corps spokesmen said that Hurley was being escorted to the base medical facility by another Marine when Hurley said his car's gasoline tank was wired like a bomb and he would detonate it if anyone tried to stop him from leaving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2002 | From Times staff reports
The Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday took the first step toward establishing a military history museum in an 18-story blimp hangar at the former Tustin Marine Corps Air Station by voting to turn over two buildings adjacent to it for use as an interim site. Dozens of veterans packed the hearing to support the idea. A feasibility study estimates the museum would cost $262 million to build and more than $6 million a year to operate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000 | Eric C Sanitate, (949) 764-4309
About 550 Irvine homes, including a number of spacious, three-bedroom spreads, are doing little more than gathering dust in an area where the need for affordable and government-subsidized housing is considered dire. Officials from Irvine and Tustin are seeking to change that by renovating the 1,257 vacant houses on the former Tustin Marine Corps Air Station for civilian use. Both cities are in a holding pattern over the 1,571-acre installation as they wait for the U.S.
NEWS
March 27, 1988
A Tustin Marine who faced life in prison after admitting that he tampered with gauges on a CH-53 Sea Stallion to prove that helicopters were unsafe will be discharged with a less-than-honorable discharge, but without a court-martial. Cpl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2003 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
When the Navy announced the closure of the Tustin Marine base in 1993, local officials immediately saw the possibilities in the 1,600-acre windfall -- new homes, parks, shopping malls and tax revenues. After 10 years, three lawsuits and countless hours of lobbying nearly every level of government, those possibilities will begin taking shape today with a groundbreaking for the first 376 homes to be built on the former base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2002 | From Times staff reports
The Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday took the first step toward establishing a military history museum in an 18-story blimp hangar at the former Tustin Marine Corps Air Station by voting to turn over two buildings adjacent to it for use as an interim site. Dozens of veterans packed the hearing to support the idea. A feasibility study estimates the museum would cost $262 million to build and more than $6 million a year to operate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Santa Ana Unified School District and the city of Tustin agreed Monday to postpone their latest court showdown over the closed Tustin Marine base to allow the district time to study a new compromise offered by the city, district attorneys said. Tustin agreed in May to pay Santa Ana Unified $60 million for the latter's claim to land at the base. At issue is how Tustin will guarantee payment. The school district wants a letter of credit; Tustin is seeking a less costly alternative.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A piece of land at the former Tustin Marine base that triggered a bitter showdown between Tustin and Santa Ana officials this year could be too contaminated for use as a school, according to environmental tests. The news comes as a blow to plans by the Santa Ana Unified School District to build a combined elementary and middle school on the 22-acre site. District officials said Tuesday that they hadn't completely reviewed an analysis of soil and gas samples taken in August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2002 | PHIL WILLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World War II blimp pilot Hugh Tolford remembers floating home in the darkness after many a patrol hunting for Japanese submarines in the Pacific, awestruck every time by the man-made wonders rising from the Santa Ana citrus groves. Towering before him, bathed in Navy floodlights, were two gargantuan blimp hangars. At 18 stories high and nearly a quarter-mile long, they remain the largest wood-frame structures in the world, according to one engineering group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2002 | From a Times Staff Writer
Orange County supervisors have bought into plans for a military museum, deciding this week to spend at least $88,000 to see whether one of the twin hangars at the closed Tustin Marine Base can be pressed into service. A veterans group has proposed converting the 18-story northern hangar into a showcase for exhibits that reflect life in wartime and pay homage to the county's 250,000 veterans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1999 | Marissa Espino, (714) 966-5879
Orange County Rescue Mission President Jim Palmer accepted the keys to the Tustin Marine Corps Air Station on Wednesday morning as the first organization to move onto the military base, which was officially decommissioned July 2. The mission has acquired 6.1 acres on the base and will use two military barracks to provide 192 beds for the homeless.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2000 | Alex Katz, (714) 966-5977
The Santa Ana Unified School District's proposal to develop a campus for students from kindergarten through community college on the former Tustin Marine Corps Air Station will be presented Tuesday at the Board of Education meeting. The district has asked the federal government to set aside 75 acres of the former base for the campus, which officials say would help reduce the number of students in seriously overcrowded classrooms. The board will meet at 7 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2002 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Navy officials agreed late Thursday to give most of the closed Tustin helicopter base to the city of Tustin, but tense negotiations continue with the Santa Ana Unified School District, which wants part of the land. The Navy will transfer the property even if Tustin cannot make a deal with Santa Ana Unified, said Tustin City Manager William A. Huston. But he said he hopes a pact would be ready to bring Monday to trustees of Santa Ana Unified and Rancho Santiago Community College District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2001 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer said Tuesday he will defend Gov. Gray Davis should Tustin sue over legislation the governor signed that orders the city to give 100 acres on a closed Marine base to two Santa Ana school districts. "Now that this measure has been debated by the Legislature and enacted, I hope all parties will make serious good-faith efforts to fully comply with its provisions," Lockyer said in a statement about AB 212, which the governor signed into law late Monday.
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