Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTutsis Tribe
IN THE NEWS

Tutsis Tribe

NEWS
April 5, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitter civil war is spreading here in the shadow of Rwanda, where a similar boil of ethnic hatred and extremist politics led to the genocidal slaughter of an estimated 800,000 people two years ago. The question is: Will Burundi, where up to 100,000 people already have been killed, go the way of tortured Rwanda?
Advertisement
NEWS
December 24, 1996
Rwandan authorities have arrested at least 500 Hutu refugees accused of genocide among the 340,000 who have returned from Tanzania this month, U.N. officials said. Anne Willem Bijleveld, an official with the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, said the refugees were arrested in northeastern Rwanda in connection with the 1994 genocide of about 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus. A Hutu refugee lobby group said the returnees were being arrested on the basis of false testimony.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defeated and bitter Rwandan army soldiers have begun killing some of their own people to stop them from returning home. And if that were not misery enough for the 900,000 refugees here, an outbreak of yet another killer disease has begun--a mysterious fever that is suspected to be typhus. U.N. relief officials said Tuesday they have confirmed that a refugee was beaten to death at a nearby camp after urging his countrymen to return home to Rwanda.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massacre earlier this month of at least 327 mostly Tutsi refugees by Hutu insurgents at a camp in northwestern Rwanda is "a resurgence of genocide," Clinton administration officials asserted Thursday. State Department spokesman James P. Rubin said the U.S. government will not act on its own but is prepared to assist in any international effort to bring the killers to justice.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the bed of a pickup truck in the red mud of an African hilltop, one enemy reached out to another Tuesday in a desperate overture to save what is left of a nation. Here in a "safe zone" of Rwanda, protected by French marines, a delegation from the nation's new government stood before thousands of followers of the defeated old government. Their message: Don't flee. Don't create another refugee crisis for the world. Don't be afraid. Rebuild Rwanda. About 1.
NEWS
May 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A United Nations court in Arusha, Tanzania, sentenced former Rwandan provincial Gov. Clement Kayishema to four life sentences on four counts of genocide for his role in the deaths of more than 800,000 people in 1994. The court also handed down a sentence of 25 years in jail to businessman Obed Ruzindana on one count of genocide. The pair orchestrated massacres in Kibuye province in western Rwanda, where the most intensive killings of ethnic Tutsis by Hutu extremists occurred.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All but forgotten by the world, this nation hangs in nerve-racking suspension, balanced between forces that dare pray for conciliation and those who would turn this troubled land into another Rwanda. The slightest misstep could tip the balance. And after a year in which Burundi witnessed its first free elections, the murder of two of its presidents and a massacre that claimed as many as 100,000 lives, the specter of uncontrolled slaughter in a neighboring land is very real, very chilling.
NEWS
July 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities in Rwanda have started a nationwide census aimed at establishing a realistic figure for the number of people slaughtered during 1994's genocide. A team of 1,600 investigators was appointed to carry out the 10-day mission, which began Monday, said Protais Musoni, secretary-general in the Ministry of Local Government. The government and human rights organizations say as many as 800,000 civilians, mostly Tutsis, were slaughtered by Hutu extremists.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two months, the world has looked on with horror at the genocidal killing in Rwanda. But, in testimony to the limits of outsiders' power, no international effort has been able to stop it. "Enough of this blood," pleaded Pope John Paul II, and from Washington and London to the capitals of Africa, similar calls have echoed across the bloodied Rwandan countryside. But they have stopped not a bullet nor saved a life.
NEWS
September 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Burundi's Roman Catholic archbishop was missing and feared dead at the hands of Hutu rebels after soldiers found the burned-out husk of his car, some blood and the charred body of one of his six passengers. The Tutsi-led military government blamed the rebels for the ambush and apparent slaying Monday afternoon of Joachim Ruhuna, whose official title is archbishop of Gitega. Ruhuna, 62, is a Tutsi known for openly criticizing both Hutu and Tutsi extremists.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|