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WORLD
October 4, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This isolated country is not much more than a few specks in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Its population wouldn't fill a fifth of Dodger Stadium. Its highest point is 16 feet above sea level. But Tuvalu is at the center of international debate over climate change. Many of Tuvalu's people worry that rising sea levels caused by global warming will wash away their country. They talk of suing the U.S.
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NEWS
July 25, 2004 | Charles J. Hanley, Associated Press Writer
It took just a bit of alphabet and a jot of punctuation to pave this island's lone road, to light the village lanes at night, to pay the rent on an office suite and a U.N. seat in far-off New York. Ever since two little letters, "tv," were plucked from the alphabet soup of the Internet and assigned to tiny Tuvalu, its 9,000 Pacific islanders have been making the most of it. Or have they?
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Cinematheque's "The Best of Slamdance 2000" continues tonight at 7:15 at the Lloyd E. Rigler Theater at the Egyptian, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., with Veit Helmer's enchanting "Tuvalu." The nearly wordless fairy tale has an intricate sound design and imagery that recall the jaunty, absurdist works of Eastern European animation that suggest the universe is an antique machine in the process of falling apart.
NEWS
June 27, 2004 | Charles J. Hanley, Associated Press Writer
The 40-odd faithful, Bibles in hand, drive straight onto the prison grounds in pickup trucks. No problem: The fence, more a hint than a hindrance, reaches only halfway around the tiny compound. They catch the convicts dozing in hammocks beside the beach, on a breezy mid-Pacific morning. In T-shirts and shorts, the six men stumble into place for impromptu prayers, listen politely to the congregation's encouraging words, reply humbly with their own words of thanks.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | Associated Press
Fire swept through a locked dormitory at a high school in the South Pacific nation of Tuvalu, killing 18 teenage girls and a matron, a government spokesman said today. The blaze was believed to have been caused by a student's candle that toppled over in the sleeping quarters of Motufoua Secondary School. The dorm was an old wooden building whose doors had been fastened shut and whose windows were covered with wire mesh.
OPINION
February 18, 2002 | JOSHUA S. REICHERT, Joshua S. Reichert directs the environment program at the Pew Charitable Trusts.
To paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, the world will little note nor long remember the inhabitants of the Pacific Island nation of Tuvalu. But these 11,000 people, who live on nine coral atolls a few hundred miles northwest of American Samoa, have earned a distinction, however dubious. They may comprise the first country to pay the ultimate price for a changing climate: national extinction. Rising sea levels are gradually inundating Tuvalu.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hong Kong residents desperate to flee before China takes over in 1997, the Federal Republic of Corterra sounded perfect. The tiny Pacific island nation was described as lying between Tahiti and Hawaii, with 80,000 citizens who enjoy democratic government, a British-style legal system and no income tax. Best of all, a newspaper ad here boasted, passports are bargain-priced at only $16,000. Three local businessmen quickly paid the $5,000 application fee. Then they discovered the catch.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plenty of entrepreneurs have ventured onto the Internet in search of money, fame or power. But the tiny Pacific island nation of Tuvalu is probably the only country that can thank the Internet for bestowing political clout and diplomatic legitimacy. Tuesday, Tuvalu will realize a long-held dream by becoming the 189th member of the United Nations.
NEWS
July 25, 2004 | Charles J. Hanley, Associated Press Writer
It took just a bit of alphabet and a jot of punctuation to pave this island's lone road, to light the village lanes at night, to pay the rent on an office suite and a U.N. seat in far-off New York. Ever since two little letters, "tv," were plucked from the alphabet soup of the Internet and assigned to tiny Tuvalu, its 9,000 Pacific islanders have been making the most of it. Or have they?
NEWS
June 27, 2004 | Charles J. Hanley, Associated Press Writer
The 40-odd faithful, Bibles in hand, drive straight onto the prison grounds in pickup trucks. No problem: The fence, more a hint than a hindrance, reaches only halfway around the tiny compound. They catch the convicts dozing in hammocks beside the beach, on a breezy mid-Pacific morning. In T-shirts and shorts, the six men stumble into place for impromptu prayers, listen politely to the congregation's encouraging words, reply humbly with their own words of thanks.
WORLD
October 4, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This isolated country is not much more than a few specks in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Its population wouldn't fill a fifth of Dodger Stadium. Its highest point is 16 feet above sea level. But Tuvalu is at the center of international debate over climate change. Many of Tuvalu's people worry that rising sea levels caused by global warming will wash away their country. They talk of suing the U.S.
OPINION
February 18, 2002 | JOSHUA S. REICHERT, Joshua S. Reichert directs the environment program at the Pew Charitable Trusts.
To paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, the world will little note nor long remember the inhabitants of the Pacific Island nation of Tuvalu. But these 11,000 people, who live on nine coral atolls a few hundred miles northwest of American Samoa, have earned a distinction, however dubious. They may comprise the first country to pay the ultimate price for a changing climate: national extinction. Rising sea levels are gradually inundating Tuvalu.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veit Helmer's "Tuvalu" is a jaunty, captivating fairy tale told essentially in mime and shot through with the sooty humor of its Eastern European locale. This one-of-a kind charmer casts an immediate and delightful spell, and could never have happened without its enchanting setting, a vast and crumbling Beaux Arts building. Helmer found the building in the heart of Sofia, Bulgaria, although for purposes of the story it's supposed to be in that country's town of Varna, on the Black Sea.
NEWS
November 25, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you live in Tuvalu, a nation of nine coral atolls strewn like petals across the South Pacific, there's nothing abstract about global warming or recent changes in the weather. The government there is exploring whether to buy land in another country, in case rising seas or storms force evacuation of the entire 10,000-member population. Teleke P.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2000 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plenty of entrepreneurs have ventured onto the Internet in search of money, fame or power. But the tiny Pacific island nation of Tuvalu is probably the only country that can thank the Internet for bestowing political clout and diplomatic legitimacy. Tuesday, Tuvalu will realize a long-held dream by becoming the 189th member of the United Nations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American Cinematheque's "The Best of Slamdance 2000" continues tonight at 7:15 at the Lloyd E. Rigler Theater at the Egyptian, 6712 Hollywood Blvd., with Veit Helmer's enchanting "Tuvalu." The nearly wordless fairy tale has an intricate sound design and imagery that recall the jaunty, absurdist works of Eastern European animation that suggest the universe is an antique machine in the process of falling apart.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veit Helmer's "Tuvalu" is a jaunty, captivating fairy tale told essentially in mime and shot through with the sooty humor of its Eastern European locale. This one-of-a kind charmer casts an immediate and delightful spell, and could never have happened without its enchanting setting, a vast and crumbling Beaux Arts building. Helmer found the building in the heart of Sofia, Bulgaria, although for purposes of the story it's supposed to be in that country's town of Varna, on the Black Sea.
NEWS
November 25, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you live in Tuvalu, a nation of nine coral atolls strewn like petals across the South Pacific, there's nothing abstract about global warming or recent changes in the weather. The government there is exploring whether to buy land in another country, in case rising seas or storms force evacuation of the entire 10,000-member population. Teleke P.
NEWS
March 10, 2000 | Associated Press
Fire swept through a locked dormitory at a high school in the South Pacific nation of Tuvalu, killing 18 teenage girls and a matron, a government spokesman said today. The blaze was believed to have been caused by a student's candle that toppled over in the sleeping quarters of Motufoua Secondary School. The dorm was an old wooden building whose doors had been fastened shut and whose windows were covered with wire mesh.
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