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BUSINESS
January 30, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Craig has a fancy flat-panel TV at home. What he doesn't have is a cable or satellite subscription, relying instead on his rooftop antenna for local broadcasts. He wants to know if there's a way he can digitally record programs without a cable or satellite box. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions In the past, Craig would have just fired up his VCR and had stacks of videocassette tapes piled around the house. What he needs these days is a digital video recorder, or DVR, which can be included in most cable and satellite boxes.
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BUSINESS
January 30, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Craig has a fancy flat-panel TV at home. What he doesn't have is a cable or satellite subscription, relying instead on his rooftop antenna for local broadcasts. He wants to know if there's a way he can digitally record programs without a cable or satellite box. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions In the past, Craig would have just fired up his VCR and had stacks of videocassette tapes piled around the house. What he needs these days is a digital video recorder, or DVR, which can be included in most cable and satellite boxes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2012 | By Susan King
The feature films  "Argo," "Zero Dark Thirty" and "Les Miserables" and the TV series "Breaking Bad" and "The Walking Dead" were among the recipients Monday of the American Film Institute's AFI Awards 2012 for outstanding achievement in film and television. According to the AFI, the honorees are "selected based on works which best advance the art of the moving image; enhance the rich cultural heritage of America's art form; inspire audiences and artists alike; and/or make a mark on American society.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Meg James
Discovery Communications Inc. has extended Chief Executive David Zaslav's lucrative employment agreement for another six years, fortifying the leadership of the cable television programming company after a period of sustained growth. The deal announced Friday modifies how Zaslav's annual compensation is calculated to provide him with substantial stock holdings in the company. He will receive a base salary and bonus targets of about $10 million a year in the early years of the agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1990
It was refreshing to read the column by Cal Thomas ("Goodby to a Romance That Led to the Sewer," Commentary, Sept. 6) on the deteriorating values of our entertainment programs on commercial television. Television executives must have their thinking caps on backwards if they honestly believe that their morally debased, so-called entertainment programs are based on "reality" in the homes all over America. The reality is that kids will emulate what they see and hear if they are not guided properly.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1989 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 35,000-member Southern California affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union has launched a campaign to combat fundamentalist groups that it says have tried to censor television programs in recent months. The campaign is aimed at supporting programs--including "Midnight Caller," "Knots Landing" and "Tour of Duty"--that have been targeted by the Rev.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1992 | ARNOLD SHAPIRO, Shapiro has received 12 Emmys and an Oscar for programs he has created and produced, including the film "Scared Straight!" He has produced nine series and more than 50 specials and films. b e is executive producer of "Scared Silent: Exposing and Ending Child Abuse," hosted by Oprah Winfrey, which is scheduled for broadcast on Sept. 4 on CBS, NBC and PBS. and
Most critics and TV reviewers complain about how few good programs there are on television. But I am amazed that there are as many good programs as there are, knowing, as I do, what it takes to get any program on the air. Those producers who actually wind up with a successful prime-time network series, TV movie or special have usually weathered an ordeal as difficult as trying to become the next President.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1987 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
South Africa's despicable apartheid is becoming less of an abstraction here and more of a horrifying reality. The new theatrical movie "Cry Freedom" is partly responsible, but more of the recent credit goes to TV, despite its record of seldom matching the South Africa reporting found in good newspapers. TV is making up ground in huge chunks this month.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual arrangement to shore up its weakness in distributing TV programs, Sony Television Entertainment on Wednesday formed a company with CBS and the talent management firm 3 Arts Entertainment to produce prime-time shows. While rivals such as Warner Bros., Paramount, Disney and Fox studios have bought or started TV networks to lock in shelf space for their shows, Sony has made no such alliance and lacks the cable reach of its competitors in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1989 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1989, ABC's "thirtysomething" ventured into uncharted waters when it showed a gay couple together in bed. Alfred Schneider, the network's vice president of policy and standards, acknowledged that the scene would not have been shown a decade ago. But in 1989, while the gay relationship passed muster, the scene might not have aired had that same couple carelessly smoked a few packs of cigarettes or gotten drunk without identifying a designated driver.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Scott Collins
CBS boss Leslie Moonves has some big plans for TV commercials -- plans that could change how much advertisers pay for a 30-second spot, what kinds of ads viewers will see and even what kinds of shows stay on the air. At the moment, advertisers pay for viewers who watch TV programs within three days of the original airdate. But Moonves is pushing for a much longer window -- up to a month, in fact. Why? Because the more time-delayed viewing on DVRs that is thrown into the mix, the higher the overall viewership is -- and the more the network can charge advertisers.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2013 | By Meg James
Comcast Corp. Chief Executive Brian Roberts has made a mission out of perfecting a new-generation remote control to help customers seamlessly find TV programs they want to watch. Now, Roberts is turning to Twitter to help him do just that. Comcast and Twitter on Wednesday announced they are teaming up to try to capitalize on the hundreds of thousands of conversations about TV shows that unfold each day on the popular micro-blogging site. The two companies have struck a strategic partnership to introduce a feature designed by Comcast engineers called "See It" that will connect consumers with TV shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By David Horsey
America has shifted from a country in which TV viewers once had weekly appointments with favorite shows - sort of like a pre-scheduled session with a therapist - to a country in which followers of TV programs engage in all-night binges - sort of like a frat house party. In the new world of television, there is no such thing as missing a show. If you were out to dinner on the night the final installment of “Breaking Bad” was shown, you can still find it days and weeks later. In fact, if you have never watched the exploits of Walter the meth king, but now want to see what all the fuss was about, you can access every single episode.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Fans of the ABC Family series "Pretty Little Liars" took to Twitter in droves to discuss the summer finale, making the drama the most-tweeted-about TV show of the week, according to Nielsen's SocialGuide. Viewers sent nearly 1.9 million tweets, as they turned to social media to mull plot developments, including a discovery that proves everything they thought they knew about the mysterious character "A" and the "A" Team might be wrong. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll According to the network, the episode generated more than 10,000 tweets a minute from about 637,000 contributors, peaking with 70,000 tweets in the show's final minute.
SPORTS
August 28, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Fox Sports West and Prime Ticket have put together 11 half-hour shows highlighting contributions and achievements during 100 years of Southern Section sports. On Thursday at 8 p.m., it kicks off with a 90-minute program featuring special guests Pat Haden, Ann Meyers-Drysdale, Eric Wynalda, Joanna Hayes and John Naber, all of whom were prep standouts in Southern California. Other programs that will focus on areas and sports: Oct. 4: "100 Athletes for 100 Years: Football.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Twitter came alive with comments about the 2013 Teen Choice Awards, where a tearful Lea Michele made her first appearance following the death of her "Glee" co-star and boyfriend Cory Monteith. Michele, who won a Choice award as actress in a comedy series, took to the stage Sunday to thank fans for their outpouring of love and support. Monteith, 31, was found dead July 13 in hotel in Vancouver, British Columbia. An autopsy ruled the death resulted from an overdose of heroin and alcohol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2012 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Dick Tufeld, a longtime radio and TV announcer who intoned "Danger, Will Robinson!" as the voice of the Robot in the 1960s science-fiction TV series "Lost in Space," has died. He was 85. Tufeld died Sunday at his home in Studio City while watching the NFL playoffs, his family said. He had heart disease and had been in declining health since sustaining a fall last year. In "Lost in Space," producer Irwin Allen's futuristic retelling of the "Swiss Family Robinson" story that aired on CBS from 1965 to 1968, actor Bob May wore the Robot costume and Tufeld provided the voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Dustin Roasa
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia - Moy Da hasn't seen his sister in nearly 40 years. Like countless Cambodian families, they were separated during the reign of the Khmer Rouge. The brutal communist regime made it official policy to dismantle the nuclear family, which it considered a capitalist relic, and divided much of the population into slave labor camps. In 1975, Moy Da, then 5 years old, and his parents, who died three years later, lost track of 15-year-old Pheap when the Khmer Rouge emptied Phnom Penh and marched residents to the countryside.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Univision's "Premios Juventud" youth awards show -- featuring an opening performance by Jennifer Lopez and Pitbull that concluded with an unexpected dip in an on-stage swimming pool -- was the most buzzed about show on television last week, according to the most recent rankings from SocialGuide. The splashy musical number set the tone for the night, in which awards were presented in 27 categories, including music, movies, novelas , sports and pop culture. Musicians Ricky Martin and Price Royce were among six Latin music stars who performed U.S. television premieres of their latest singles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
DreamWorks Animation has signed a multi-year deal to produce more than 300 hours of original programming for Netflix Inc. Under the terms of the agreement, DreamWorks Animation, creator of "Shrek," "Kung Fu Panda" and "Madagascar" franchises, will develop shows for Netflix based on its own past and upcoming feature films. DreamWorks Animation will also use the Classic Media library it acquired as a resource. That library includes the characters Casper the Friendly Ghost, Rocky and Bullwinkle, and Mr. Peabody and Sherman.
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