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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2010 | By Ada Calhoun
Has there ever been a better moment for tween girls? "Hannah Montana" and "Wizards of Waverly Place" reign on the Disney Channel. Tween idol Taylor Swift rules the radio. There are even tween girls in the White House. Since mega-successes like "High School Musical," Miley Cyrus and the Jonas Brothers showed execs the way, pop culture has been flooded with tween girl entertainment. And yet another promising series about a cool teen girl, "Victorious," debuts on Nickelodeon on Saturday. But what about the boys?
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
The boy band One Direction is headed straight to the top of the box office over Labor Day weekend, thanks to throngs of overzealous teenage girls. "One Direction: This Is Us," a 3-D concert documentary about the mega-popular British group, is set to rule at the multiplex, likely debuting with a robust $22 million over the four-day long weekend, according to those who have seen pre-release audience surveys. But another tween icon, Selena Gomez, won't have cause to celebrate during the holiday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2010 | By Ada Calhoun, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Parents, beware! The children of America are sneaking onto your laptops and borrowing your iPhones to watch an addictive, viral video campaign. Fortunately, the purveyor of these videos is neither a political extremist nor a sexual predator, but instead a cheerful, ambitious teenager from the Midwest named Lucas Cruikshank. A 17-year-old high school junior, Cruikshank lives with his large, happy family in Nebraska. For the last few years, he has been posting homemade videos to YouTube as his alter ego, an insane 6-year-old named Fred Figglehorn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Greg Heffley, Big Nate, Nikki Maxwell and other tween book characters are back. Captain Underpants and the Terrifying Return of Tippy Tinkletrousers By Dav Pilkey Scholastic, 304 pp.: $9.99, for ages 7 and up Elementary school mischief makers travel back in time to kindergarten to confront a sixth-grade bully in the ninth installment of this series following the exploits of George and Harold and their principal-turned-superhero Captain...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2010 | ROBERT LLOYD, TELEVISION CRITIC
Like much else in modern entertainment, a new "movie" premiering Sunday on Nickelodeon, is an element in a cross-platform marketing plan. (It is a movie in the sense that it is a stand-alone talking picture, not that it is any longer than your average hour of commercial-filled television.) That's fine: I have no problem with being marketed to across platforms, as long as it's done with verve and personality, and that's the case here. It's not as if show business has been ever an exercise in altruism.
NEWS
July 11, 2004 | Jacqueline Cutler, Special to The Times
There is a shriek indigenous only to 'tween girls, and if there were any justice, it would be heard only by others who consider body glitter essential. The shriek happens when that really cute guy asks one of them to hang out at the mall, or when one of them gets a terrific pair of shoes. The shriek knows no ethnic or socioeconomic boundaries.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2010 | By Sandra Pedicini
Clothing stores aimed at teenagers and twentysomethings are expanding their reach, trying to hook customers barely out of kindergarten with their own lines. Teen retailer Aeropostale Inc. last year launched its first P.S. from Aeropostale for children ages 7 to 12. It has opened almost 40 of them and is expected to have 45 by year-end. Aeropostale calls P.S. "a logical extension" of its brand. It hopes to capture some of the multibillion-dollar preteen or "tween" market, which has been largely the domain of mass merchandisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2008 | Todd Martens, Times Staff Writer
By all appearances, "The Pussycat Dolls Present: Girlicious" is like any other competitive reality show. The grand prize is a spot in a new group, contestants must face a judges' panel, and celebrities such as N'Sync's JC Chasez are treated like royalty. But there was a moment in the CW series' third episode when Robin Antin, the choreography maven who dreamed up the burlesque troupe in West Hollywood clubs in the mid-'90s, cut to the heart of the major-label music business in 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1996
We applaud the international community coming together to help a million Rwandan refugees (Nov. 30). The U.S. can easily do more to support the most vulnerable among the refugees, the children, by insisting the Senate ratify the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, which sets up minimum standards for protecting children. The main reason the U.S. has not ratified the CRC is because of a campaign of misconception launched by CRC opponents, who erroneously claim the CRC usurps national and state sovereignty and would dictate how Americans raise their children.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
Did Bowersox get robbed? Does the iron-fisted, despotic rule of trigger-happy tween girls overly skew "Idol's" results? Put aside these questions for a moment and instead bask in the meta-media explosion that is "American Idols Live! Tour 2010," where all your favorites from last season band together to jockey for the ever-rare brass ring of a post-show career. Ticket sales have been rough around the country, so savor the fact that this L.A. show is still on. Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., L.A. 7:30 p.m. Fri. $40.50-$76.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Daytime television has "The View. " Now YouTube has its own chatfest called "IMO. " The Web show, whose initials are recognizable as "In My Opinion" to those fluent in messaging shorthand, deals with dating, texting faux pas and other pressing topics relevant to teens and tweens. Its hosts are nearly as well known to these young viewers as ABC's Barbara Walters and Whoopi Goldberg are to an older generation. Before taking her seat on "IMO's" canary yellow couch, 16-year-old Bethany Mota launched a YouTube channel that has attracted nearly 85 million views of her fashion and beauty tips.
OPINION
June 11, 2012 | By Peggy Orenstein
I suspect parents will greet last weekend's report that Facebook may officially open a version of its site to preteens the same way their kids would: with an eye-rolling whatever. After all, more than half of parents with 12-year-olds said in a recent survey that their child already has an account and most had lied about their kid's age to help them open it. Acknowledging that reality, Facebook says, will provide a legitimate "on-ramp" that would (in addition to boosting its rolls)
BUSINESS
April 28, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney Studios is hoping to score a date with an audience it long has found elusive — teenage girls — with "Prom," a coming-of-age story that opens Friday. The $8 million film, among the first to be put into production by studio Chairman Rich Ross, is a more mature take on teen life than the "High School Musical" franchise he oversaw during his tenure at Disney Channel. But in adhering to the family-friendly Disney brand, "Prom" omits the naughtier aspects of the big night, specifically drinking and sex. Some question whether this chaste portrayal will ring true with the teen audience the studio is courting.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Akata Witch A Novel Nnedi Okorafor Viking: 352 pp., $17.99, ages 12 and older The protagonist at the center of the young-adult novel "Akata Witch" lives in many worlds. She is, in the truest sense, African American: Nigerian by ancestry, American by birth. Born in New York, she moved to West Africa with her parents and brothers when she was 9. But Sunny Nwazue is also albino, with skin the color of "sour milk" and "hazel eyes that look like God ran out of the right color.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2010 | By Sandra Pedicini
Clothing stores aimed at teenagers and twentysomethings are expanding their reach, trying to hook customers barely out of kindergarten with their own lines. Teen retailer Aeropostale Inc. last year launched its first P.S. from Aeropostale for children ages 7 to 12. It has opened almost 40 of them and is expected to have 45 by year-end. Aeropostale calls P.S. "a logical extension" of its brand. It hopes to capture some of the multibillion-dollar preteen or "tween" market, which has been largely the domain of mass merchandisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2010 | By Ada Calhoun, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Parents, beware! The children of America are sneaking onto your laptops and borrowing your iPhones to watch an addictive, viral video campaign. Fortunately, the purveyor of these videos is neither a political extremist nor a sexual predator, but instead a cheerful, ambitious teenager from the Midwest named Lucas Cruikshank. A 17-year-old high school junior, Cruikshank lives with his large, happy family in Nebraska. For the last few years, he has been posting homemade videos to YouTube as his alter ego, an insane 6-year-old named Fred Figglehorn.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writer
When a 15-year-old girl flashes a hint of her green bra in a playfully naughty photo on the Internet, hardly anyone -- aside from perhaps her parents -- blinks. But when the teen is Miley Cyrus, the face of the billion-dollar "Hannah Montana" Disney Channel franchise, everyone stares. The provocative images risk tainting the squeaky-clean image that's made her a hero for young girls. Disney Channel has emerged as a powerful creative engine for the Walt Disney Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2009 | Denise Martin
Everyone knows who Hannah Montana is. But perhaps only kids know she's been unseated as TV's reigning tween queen by one Carly Shay. When no one was looking, Carly, the plucky 15-year-old star of the Nickelodeon comedy "iCarly," overtook Disney Channel's "Hannah Montana" -- and this year, "American Idol" -- in the ratings race for young audiences. Miranda Cosgrove, who plays Carly, is still a name that draws quizzical looks while Miley Cyrus sells out Cineplexes and concert stadiums.
IMAGE
September 5, 2010 | By Alene Dawson, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Whether it's their first Bonne Bell Lip Smackers or playing dress-up with their mothers' lipstick, many girls start experimenting with makeup early. For tweens and teens, one of the rituals of back-to-school time is the fight with Mom over what is and isn't age- and school-appropriate. And, yes, that discussion is starting earlier. Though women ages 18 to 64 are using less makeup, tween girls (ages 8 to 12) are using more, according to a new report from market research firm the NPD Group.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
Did Bowersox get robbed? Does the iron-fisted, despotic rule of trigger-happy tween girls overly skew "Idol's" results? Put aside these questions for a moment and instead bask in the meta-media explosion that is "American Idols Live! Tour 2010," where all your favorites from last season band together to jockey for the ever-rare brass ring of a post-show career. Ticket sales have been rough around the country, so savor the fact that this L.A. show is still on. Staples Center, 1111 S. Figueroa St., L.A. 7:30 p.m. Fri. $40.50-$76.
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