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Twyla Tharp

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2008 | Laura Bleiberg, Special to The Times
Choreographer Twyla Tharp and American Ballet Theatre have had a mutually advantageous relationship for 20 years now, a good long run in a fickle world. The once-iconoclastic Tharp alighted at ABT as an artistic associate in the late 1980s. She then ditched her fabulous modern dance company and has been on a roller coaster career ever since, zinging from Broadway musicals to movies, back to modern dance and then again to ballet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By David Ng
Choreographer Twyla Tharp, whose work spans ballet, modern dance, jazz and Broadway, is to receive a lifetime achievement honor during this year's Tribeca Film Festival. Tharp is scheduled to receive the honor at the annual Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Awards, to be held in New York on April 26. One of the most prolific choreographers working today, Tharp has created stage pieces for her own dance company, American Ballet Theatre, New York City Ballet, Paris Opera Ballet and many other major dance organizations around the world.  The awards organizers said in a statement that "through dance, she has created her own language and pushed the boundaries of our notions of movement for the past 50 years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1996
Auditions will be held by choreographer Twyla Tharp in Los Angeles Feb. 19 at the UCLA Dance Building, Theater 200, for young dancers needed for an international tour scheduled to begin in September. Registration is from 7 to 10 a.m. Auditions will also be conducted during February in other cities, including Chicago and Miami. Information: (800) 670-1170.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2011 | By Holley Farmer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I'm the girl in the blue dress dancing on Frank Sinatra's hat. I'm also on a key chain and a magnet. I'm not in the production of Twyla Tharp's musical "Come Fly Away" that's reaching the Pantages Theatre this week, but I'm proud my image is being used for publicity. There we are, my trusty partner and I, locked in a cameo dance embrace. My knee is wrapped faithfully around his waist. We are staring at each other's noses. I've seen this pose replicated over and over during the credits for "Dancing With the Stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1988 | ROBERT GRESKOVIC
What started 25 years ago as the iconoclastic work of a very determined young woman and a few similarly dedicated female dancers has become Twyla Tharp Dance. The "bunch of broads doing God's work"--to use one of Tharp's own wry references to her nascent group--has grown into an ensemble company of eight women and nine men that tours a good deal here and abroad offering a stable repertory. But the process seems to have taken its toll on Tharp. At 45, she sounds angry, discouraged, tired.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1993 | DONNA PERLMUTTER, Donna Perlmutter writes regularly for The Times
Who says the dance boom of the '70s and '80s is over? Not Lou Conte, artistic director of Chicago's Hubbard Street Company. Indeed, not anyone talented and lucky enough to enjoy a lend-lease program with that madcap choreographer, Twyla Tharp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1988 | EILEEN SONDAK
The whole point of modern dance was to rebel against the rigid rules of classical ballet. Toe shoes, tutus and the quest for ethereal beauty were the first things to go when modern dancers began their experiments with floor-bound moves and reality-based expressions. Then, along came the post-modernists with their own "anything goes" attitude.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1988 | LEWIS SEGAL, Times Dance Writer
Two years ago, Twyla Tharp's face peered out from one of those MasterCard "Master the Possibilities" ads, next to the statement (attributed to her): "Commitment brings substance to dance." That quote could also caption any photo of "In the Upper Room," a large-scale work relying on commitment, versatility and stamina that Tharp choreographed for her company at about the same time.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Feminist modern dance based on Greek myth: Isn't that exactly what you'd expect from the Martha Graham company? Perhaps, but you might have been surprised by at least one of the company's Greek dance-dramas Thursday at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts.
NEWS
January 27, 1994 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers classical music and dance for The Times Orange County Edition
At first blush, "Demeter and Persephone" could easily be another piece from Martha Graham's great Greek period. For about a decade beginning in the mid-1940s, the visionary modern dance creator scrutinized and reinterpreted Greek myths and dramas, retelling them in visceral movement terms and always from a feminist perspective. "Cave of the Heart," created in 1946, focused on Medea and her abandonment by Jason, the opportunistic leader of the Argonauts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | Josh Getlin
When Frank Sinatra fans play his music, classic songs like "Summer Wind," "Fly Me to the Moon" and "One for My Baby" will likely trigger strong emotions and memories. But when Twyla Tharp sifts through his catalog, it conjures up an entire world. Who was she when she first heard these songs, compared with the woman she is today? Why do they remind her of so many couples she's known? And what is the essence of Ol' Blue Eyes' music beyond the thrill of an unforgettable vocal? Tharp, one of the dance world's most respected choreographers and directors, set out to answer these questions in her newest musical, "Come Fly With Me," based on Sinatra's songs, which began previews this week at Atlanta's Alliance Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2009 | David Ng
Producers of a new stage musical set to the original vocals of Frank Sinatra said "Come Fly With Me" will run from Sept. 23 through Oct. 11 at the Alliance Theater in Atlanta and then will tour nationally next year. Directed by Tony-winning choreographer Twyla Tharp, "Come Fly With Me" will feature original recorded masters of Sinatra's voice accompanied by a 17-piece onstage band. The music will comprise Sinatra staples and songs from the Great American Songbook, among them "Let's Fall in Love," "Witchcraft," "Summer Wind," "Body and Soul," "That's Life," "Nice 'n' Easy" and, of course, "My Way."
NATIONAL
December 8, 2008 | Cynthia Dizikes, Dizikes is a writer in our Washington bureau.
Barbra Streisand, a vocal critic of President Bush, visited the White House this weekend but kept the gloves on. The Brooklyn-born diva was one of six performing artists celebrated at this year's Kennedy Center Honors, one of the most prestigious awards in the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2008 | Laura Bleiberg, Special to The Times
Choreographer Twyla Tharp and American Ballet Theatre have had a mutually advantageous relationship for 20 years now, a good long run in a fickle world. The once-iconoclastic Tharp alighted at ABT as an artistic associate in the late 1980s. She then ditched her fabulous modern dance company and has been on a roller coaster career ever since, zinging from Broadway musicals to movies, back to modern dance and then again to ballet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
The West Coast premiere of a Twyla Tharp collaboration with rock star composer Elvis Costello, "Nightspot," and the return of the Kirov Ballet will highlight the 2008-09 "Dance at the Music Center" series. "Nightspot," to be danced by Edward Villella's Miami City Ballet, will open the season Oct. 24. The work is the most recent creation by the innovative choreographer, whose Broadway hit "Movin' Out" was set to music by rocker Billy Joel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
When San Diego's Old Globe announced last week that its co-artistic director Jerry Patch had accepted a position as director of artistic development at Manhattan Theatre Club, few may have registered the extent of the theatrical loss to Southern California. For those on alert, the news also carried a faint yet detectable signal of what may be the most insidious problem facing American theater today -- the subtle and not-so-subtle blurring of commercial and nonprofit realms. The issue boils down to procedures, values and, most important, who's in control.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1991 | MARK CARO, Mark Caro is a free-lance writer based in Chicago.
"One, two--wait!" Choreographer Twyla Tharp stopped the action almost immediately after it had begun. "I should feel the feet are reluctant to get off the floor," she told the dancers. "I should feel. . ."--she slid her hands against each other--". . . that ." Members of the Hubbard Street Dance Company returned to their initial positions, concentrating intently on clearing their minds. "Let's consider this concept that's called 'natural,' " Tharp said. "Let's see natural."
NEWS
November 9, 2006
Don't look back: "The Times They Are A-Changin'," the Twyla Tharp musical that uses songs by Bob Dylan, will close Nov. 19 at Broadway's Brooks Atkinson Theatre. The show, which opened Oct. 26 to largely negative reviews, will have played 28 performances and 35 previews.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2006 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
ALTHOUGH dance is probably one of our earliest art forms, the custom of having professional dancers perform for an audience is of relatively recent vintage. Where 19th or 20th century dance lovers flocked to theaters to see Taglioni, Nijinsky or Margot Fonteyn, back in Elizabethan times, the courtiers and queen herself were the ones to do the dancing. Whether it took place at a royal palace or a country village, dancing was both an art and a regular part of social life.
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