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Ty Cobb

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May 11, 1989 | Jim Murray
Once upon a time, there was this ballplayer and he was one of the best ever to play the game. He played with great intensity and verve, not to say abandon, and he got more hits than anyone else who ever played the game. You might say he sort of symbolized it. And then one day, rumors began to spread about him. He, of all people, had been betting on games, the whispers went. He was mixed up in some very bad company. All baseball was aghast--to say nothing of the rest of the country.
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SPORTS
March 14, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Ty Cobb is in town for a short homestand, the Detroit Tiger prowling center field at a modest theater across from Joe's Smog Check. Not a big place. Seats about 90, or roughly the number of folks Cobb beat the living spit out of in his long, terror-filled career. With Cobb, to know him is to hate him. Think today's athletes have anger management issues? Think they struggle with impulse control? Bunch of cupcakes. Look at some of the stunts Cobb pulled: - In New York, he confronted a one-armed heckler and nearly stomped the man to death.
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SPORTS
March 14, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Ty Cobb is in town for a short homestand, the Detroit Tiger prowling center field at a modest theater across from Joe's Smog Check. Not a big place. Seats about 90, or roughly the number of folks Cobb beat the living spit out of in his long, terror-filled career. With Cobb, to know him is to hate him. Think today's athletes have anger management issues? Think they struggle with impulse control? Bunch of cupcakes. Look at some of the stunts Cobb pulled: - In New York, he confronted a one-armed heckler and nearly stomped the man to death.
SPORTS
May 27, 2011 | Eric Sondheimer
With a school-record 50 hits and a .521 batting average, Ty Moore of Santa Ana Mater Dei should be able to tell everyone he's named after one of the greatest hitters of all time, Ty Cobb. Except that his mother, Tammy, said she just happened to name her second child Ty because she liked the name. Regardless, the name fits perfectly, because Moore has become one of the most feared hitters in Southern California for a team that lately has no easy outs in its lineup. "This is one of the best offensive teams I've played on in my entire career of baseball," said Moore, a junior outfielder who has committed to UCLA.
SPORTS
September 12, 1985
NOTE: The statistics on this page are those of Pete Rose, with the exception of Ty Cobb's career statistics, Cobb's managerial statistics and Cobb's career comparisons to Rose. The statistics were compiled by the Associated Press. BALLPARK AVERAGES Park AB Hits Avg. Atlanta Stadium 652 220 .337 Jarry Park 196 65 .332 Riverfront 3,109 983 .316 Crosley Field 2,254 715 .317 Connie Mack 284 90 .317 Busch (Old) 116 36 .310 Polo Grounds 39 12 .308 Astrodome 666 204 .306 Veteran's Stadium 1,605 483 .
SPORTS
June 28, 1985
How determined was Ty Cobb to become a success in baseball? According to his biographer, it was almost a matter of life and death. William Gildea of the Washington Post, quoting from the book, "Ty Cobb," by Charles Alexander, said Cobb, early in his career, suffered a severe case of tonsillitis while the Detroit Tigers were on a spring barnstorming tour. Without telling the club, for fear he'd be taken out of the lineup, Cobb went to a hotel doctor in Toledo.
SPORTS
February 11, 2001 | HAL BOCK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Early in the off-Broadway production of "Cobb," an elderly Ty Cobb pulls a revolver from under his robe to confront two earlier images of himself, each already equipped with his own firearm. Nobody gets shot--this time. Playwright Lee Blessing's treatment of the Georgia Peach comes complete with all of Cobb's warts, including the psychological scars left when his mother killed his father with a gun in an accident--if that's what it was.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Occidental College baseball coach Jason Hawkins' eyes lit up when he learned who was coming to the Eagle Rock campus. Ty Cobb was enrolling. "When you hear about someone with that name, c'mon, you're excited, right?" Hawkins said. Cobb is the 19-year-old great-grandson of Ty Cobb, the legendary Detroit Tigers outfielder and Baseball Hall of Famer who is considered one of the game's all-time best players. The 6-foot-5 Occidental freshman is a left-hander who pitched and played first base at his high school in Atherton, Calif.
SPORTS
July 9, 1997 | MIKE PENNER
Willie Mays, you're no Ty Cobb. So contends Shirley Povich, the venerable Washington Post sportswriter who is old enough to have seen both players at their athletic peak--and claims there's no comparison between the two. "My colleagues at the Baseball Writers Association of America have chosen their All-Time All-Star team," Povich writes. "In most cases they are most perceptive and correct and in some cases they are nuts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | STEVE HARVEY
Proving that sports collectors will buy anything, a woman paid $7,475 this week for the false teeth of baseball great Ty Cobb. But what really caught my eye was that the choppers first passed from Cobb to Al Stump, a sportswriter for the old L.A. Herald Examiner. Why the gift? Cobb was possibly being sentimental toward Stump, the author of "Cobb: The Life and Times of the Meanest Man Who Ever Played Baseball."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
Occidental College baseball coach Jason Hawkins' eyes lit up when he learned who was coming to the Eagle Rock campus. Ty Cobb was enrolling. "When you hear about someone with that name, c'mon, you're excited, right?" Hawkins said. Cobb is the 19-year-old great-grandson of Ty Cobb, the legendary Detroit Tigers outfielder and Baseball Hall of Famer who is considered one of the game's all-time best players. The 6-foot-5 Occidental freshman is a left-hander who pitched and played first base at his high school in Atherton, Calif.
SPORTS
March 23, 2008 | From the Associated Press
LAKELAND, Fla. -- It's good to be Curtis Granderson. The Detroit Tigers center fielder is coming off a spectacular season in which he was mentioned in the same breath with Willie Mays and Ty Cobb. Unlike many baseball players, who skip college en route to the majors, the son of two teachers has two degrees. The 27-year-old Granderson is popular in the clubhouse and accommodates the masses outside of it by signing autographs incessantly, visiting schools, writing blogs and traveling the world as a Major League Baseball ambassador.
SPORTS
July 31, 2006
The longest consecutive-game hitting streaks in the major leagues since 1901: * Joe DiMaggio, 1941...56 * Pete Rose 1978...44 * George Sisler, 1922...41 * Ty Cobb, 1911...40 * Paul Molitor, 1987...39 * x-Jimmy Rollins, 2005-06...38 * Tommy Holmes, 1945...37 * Luis Castillo, 2002...35 * Ty Cobb, 1917...35 * Benito Santiago, 1987...34 * Dom DiMaggio, 1949...34 * George McQuinn, 1938...34 * George Sisler, 1925...34 * Heinie Manush, 1933...33 * Rogers Hornsby, 1922...33 * Hal Chase, 1907...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2002 | SEAN MITCHELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What is the final measure of a man who achieves greatness in his chosen profession but sacrifices his humanity to do so? It's an age-old question that playwright Lee Blessing asks anew in "Cobb," a dramatic perusal of the legendary baseball player Ty Cobb, at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank. Essentially a one-man show performed by four actors, "Cobb" predates Ron Shelton's 1994 movie of the same title that starred Tommy Lee Jones, and has been staged around the country for more than a decade.
SPORTS
July 6, 2002 | ROSS NEWHAN
Traded by the Angels during the previous off-season, second baseman Jerry Remy was in his first spring with the Boston Red Sox. It was 1978, and he was sitting in the clubhouse in Winter Haven, Fla., when Ted Williams walked in, stopped in front of a mirror, and said to no one and anyone: "I'm looking at the greatest hitter who ever lived." Remy laughed as he recalled the incident Friday and said, "I certainly wasn't going to argue, and no one else did either." Nor would I. Not then, not now.
SPORTS
July 28, 2001
Did you ever wonder how players such as Ty Cobb, Rogers Hornsby, Babe Ruth and Ted Williams, etc. accomplished what they did without the benefit of a batting coach with a video millisecond-by-millisecond breakdown of their swing, physical trainers with whirlpools, MRIs, onsite X-rays, pain pills, cortisone shots plus batting helmets, elbow protectors, gloves with built-in knuckle protection and shin guards for the either leg, or both? And . . . no Scott Boras? Fred E. Stemrich Claremont
SPORTS
August 5, 1985 | AL STUMP
As Pete Rose closes in on Ty Cobb's lifetime hits record, more attention is being paid to the career of the man called the Georgia Peach. This article on Cobb's final months, written in 1961, was described by Bob Considine as "perhaps the best sports piece I have ever read." It won the Associated Press' Best Sports Story of the Year Award. Al Stump wrote this story for True magazine. Stump, 64, is a free lance writer who has had more than 1,000 magazine articles and 7 books published.
SPORTS
September 16, 1992 | SHAV GLICK
On this date 83 years ago, Ty Cobb rode to Shibe Park in Philadelphia in a taxicab surrounded by six police wagons. Three weeks earlier, Cobb had spiked Frank (Home Run) Baker of the Athletics. Horace Fogel of the Philadelphia Bulletin wrote, "This city seethes with Cobb hatred." One headline said: "13 Black Hand Death Threat Letters Received by Detroit Star." Assassination by sniper at Shibe Park was promised, historian Al Stump recalls.
SPORTS
May 23, 2001
Most hitless games in .400 seasons (1903-2000; eight players have hit .400 12 times): 1. Ted Williams: 29 hitless games when he batted .406 in 1941 2. Rogers Hornsby: 27 hitless games when he batted .403 in 1925 3. Ty Cobb: 26 hitless games when he batted .401 in 1922 4. Bill Terry: 25 hitless games when he batted .401 in 1930 5. George Sisler: 24 hitless games when he batted .407 in 1920 6. Rogers Hornsby: 24 hitless games when he batted .424 in 1924 Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
February 11, 2001 | HAL BOCK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Early in the off-Broadway production of "Cobb," an elderly Ty Cobb pulls a revolver from under his robe to confront two earlier images of himself, each already equipped with his own firearm. Nobody gets shot--this time. Playwright Lee Blessing's treatment of the Georgia Peach comes complete with all of Cobb's warts, including the psychological scars left when his mother killed his father with a gun in an accident--if that's what it was.
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