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Tyler Prize

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alice Christine Tyler, a major benefactor of USC and Pepperdine University and co-founder of the John and Alice Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement, has died. She was 80. Mrs. Tyler, who lived in Bel-Air, died Tuesday at UCLA Medical Center. A lifelong environmentalist, Mrs. Tyler founded the $150,000 annual prize in 1973 to honor scientists whose work identifies them as "guardians of the future."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1988 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
For UC Irvine chemist F. Sherwood Rowland, Tuesday's report documenting depletion of the ozone layer at both poles represents yet another vindication of his pioneering research. "There are a lot of things happening to the atmosphere," Rowland said in an interview with The Times in 1986, "and almost none of them are good."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1986
Two Swiss-born scientists Friday were named winners of the 1986 Tyler Prize for their work to control pollution of lakes in the United States, Switzerland and other parts of the world. Chemist Werner Stumm, the "conscience of the Swiss lakes," and biologist Richard A. Vollenweider, who led the way for reversal of pollution in the Great Lakes, each will receive $75,000 and a gold medallion during a formal dinner ceremony tonight at Chasen's in Los Angeles.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
The role of fashion in society is unquestioned: How many presidents of charitable groups do you know with run-down heels? So it should come as no surprise that this year's crop of Eve winners for the Mannequins of the Assistance League of Southern California is a well-manicured bunch, some couture-oriented, all polished to a sheen. Awards chairman Linda Blackburn announced the Mannequins list of best-dressed for 1988--all with a major tilt to the volunteer scene. They are Marion (Mrs.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
There will be tropical breezes and flowers, moonlight and soft Hawaiian chants for members of ARCS (Achievement Rewards for College Scientists) attending the annual meeting at the Kahala Hilton on Oahu this week. Among Angelenos in the islands are Mrs. Stuart Davis, president of the national executive boards, ARCS Foundation Inc.; Mrs. James Goerz, president of the Los Angeles chapter; and Mrs. Thomas F. Grojean, president of Los Angeles ARCS Auxiliary Chapter.
NEWS
May 24, 1985 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Biochemist Bruce Ames of the University of California, Berkeley, who developed a test that helps prevent cancer-causing substances from reaching the marketplace, and an international organization dedicated to preserving tropical ecosystems will share the Tyler Prize for 1985, splitting a cash award of $150,000. The prize, regarded as one of the world's top awards for environmental scientists and leaders, will be awarded Saturday night at a banquet at Chasen's restaurant.
NEWS
December 7, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clair C. (Pat) Patterson, a Caltech geochemist who scientifically dated the age of the Earth and discovered lead contamination in modern humans, leading to the Clean Air Act of 1970, has died. He was 73. Patterson, who had taught and done research at Caltech for four decades, died Tuesday at his home in Sea Ranch in Northern California.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | JEAN DAVIDSON and SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writers
UC Irvine chemistry Prof. F. Sherwood Rowland has been awarded the internationally prestigious Japan Prize by the Science and Technology Foundation of Japan for his documentation of the destruction of the Earth's ozone layer. The 50-million-yen award in environmental sciences and technology goes to Rowland for his theoretical analysis of the depletion of Earth's protective ozone layer and his prediction of the rate of depletion. At current exchange rates, the prize is worth about $387,600.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | MARY LOU LOPER
Angelenos Rockwell and Marna Schnabel are celebrating the fact that he's been confirmed by the U. S. Senate as deputy secretary of commerce (the No. 2 position in the Department of Commerce under Secretary Robert A. Mosbacher). They're spending the Easter weekend in Palm Desert in the company of son Evan (who will be a White House intern this summer) and daughters Darrin and Christy. An international investment banker, Schnabel is undersecretary of commerce for travel and tourism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Thomas Eisner, who became known as the "father of chemical ecology" as a result of his pioneering studies of how insects use chemicals to mate, elude predators and capture prey, died March 25 at his home in Ithaca, N.Y. He was 81 and had Parkinson's disease. Eisner, who spent his entire professional life at Cornell University, combined the observational skills of Charles Darwin with an inquisitiveness that caused him to look far beyond superficial characteristics. At a 2000 celebration of Eisner's career, biochemist John Law of the University of Arizona said: "Thousands of people can look at the same plant or animal and see the same thing, and there is the one person, like Tom, who comes along and sees something different.
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