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Typhoid Fever

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1998 | Associated Press
Scientists say they may have discovered the reason cystic fibrosis is so common: typhoid fever. Cystic fibrosis affects about 30,000 children and young adults in the United States. It occurs when a person inherits two defective copies of a gene called CFTR. A person who inherits only one bad copy isn't affected. About 12 million Americans carry a single defective copy of the gene. To remain that common, a potentially lethal gene must provide some kind of advantage to such carriers.
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TRAVEL
January 30, 2005 | Kathleen Doheny, Healthy Traveler
When Los Angeles resident Elias Ferrer flew back to his native Philippines in 2001, he didn't take any precautions against malaria, though the disease is present in rural areas there. "It was an emergency trip," says Ferrer, 54, who was traveling to a funeral. Though he didn't get sick, if Ferrer were to return now with any of his four children, ages 10 to 21, all of them would follow a preventive regimen such as taking antimalarial pills, he says. Many U.S. immigrants, however, don't take such precautions when they return to their homelands.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1998
Alexander the Great, long thought to have died from poison or malaria, probably succumbed to typhoid fever, researchers report in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The Macedonian king was drinking heavily in Babylon after a successful campaign when he cried out in pain, saying it felt like he had been hit in the liver by an arrow. He had a raging fever, chills and sweats before falling into a coma and dying 11 days later on June 10, 323 BC.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration announced a voluntary nationwide recall of some frozen mamey products, after the fruit was linked to a typhoid fever outbreak that has sickened at least 13 people in South Florida. The agency urged customers who bought frozen mamey under the El Sembrador and La Fe brands to return it for a refund. Mamey is a tropical fruit often used to make shakes, called batidos.
NEWS
September 17, 1986
Four women who ate at the same McDonald's restaurant have been diagnosed as having typhoid fever, health officials said. The women all ate shrimp salad at a McDonald's restaurant in Silver Spring, Md. "We feel pretty confident that this was just one McDonald's and not all of them," said Ray Feldman of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1987
A new penny-a-dose vaccine can largely prevent typhoid fever, one of the world's most common diseases, without causing side effects that have undermined earlier efforts at controlling the illness, researchers say. In tests in Nepal, the vaccine was 75% effective in stopping the disease, a major cause of fever and death in many parts of the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998
Cystic fibrosis may be one of the most common hereditary diseases because carriers of the faulty gene have an enhanced natural resistance to typhoid, U.S. doctors report in Nature. The finding could explain why the defective gene is passed on to subsequent generations. Cystic fibrosis occurs when a child has two defective copies of the gene, one from each parent, that encodes a protein known as cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR).
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | Reuters
Typhoid fever and malnutrition are spreading in Iraq because of water-supply disruptions and shortages of food, especially baby formula, international relief organizations say. U.N. sanctions imposed on Iraq last August are eroding health and nutrition by preventing the import of enough anti-typhoid drugs, chlorine for water purification and basic foodstuffs for its 18 million people, they say.
TRAVEL
January 30, 2005 | Kathleen Doheny, Healthy Traveler
When Los Angeles resident Elias Ferrer flew back to his native Philippines in 2001, he didn't take any precautions against malaria, though the disease is present in rural areas there. "It was an emergency trip," says Ferrer, 54, who was traveling to a funeral. Though he didn't get sick, if Ferrer were to return now with any of his four children, ages 10 to 21, all of them would follow a preventive regimen such as taking antimalarial pills, he says. Many U.S. immigrants, however, don't take such precautions when they return to their homelands.
HEALTH
September 2, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL
If the woman in this picture has a sour expression, who can blame her? For 26 years, she was held captive on a small island in New York's East River. Health officials kept her there because they said she was making people sick--a charge that the woman, Mary Mallon, viewed as utterly outrageous. She'd never hurt a fly, she insisted. She'd merely tried to earn a living as a cook. Mary Mallon was the original "Typhoid Mary," one of the first identified healthy carriers of a disease.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration announced a voluntary nationwide recall of some frozen mamey products, after the fruit was linked to a typhoid fever outbreak that has sickened at least 13 people in South Florida. The agency urged customers who bought frozen mamey under the El Sembrador and La Fe brands to return it for a refund. Mamey is a tropical fruit often used to make shakes, called batidos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1999
After several reported cases of typhoid, the Food and Drug Administration on Monday announced a voluntary nationwide recall of frozen fruit products linked to the illness. The large tropical fruit, called mamey, has a soft pulp that ranges in color from salmon pink to red. Frozen mamey products under the brands of El Sembrador and La Fe are being recalled, FDA officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1998 | Associated Press
Scientists say they may have discovered the reason cystic fibrosis is so common: typhoid fever. Cystic fibrosis affects about 30,000 children and young adults in the United States. It occurs when a person inherits two defective copies of a gene called CFTR. A person who inherits only one bad copy isn't affected. About 12 million Americans carry a single defective copy of the gene. To remain that common, a potentially lethal gene must provide some kind of advantage to such carriers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1998
Alexander the Great, long thought to have died from poison or malaria, probably succumbed to typhoid fever, researchers report in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The Macedonian king was drinking heavily in Babylon after a successful campaign when he cried out in pain, saying it felt like he had been hit in the liver by an arrow. He had a raging fever, chills and sweats before falling into a coma and dying 11 days later on June 10, 323 BC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1998
Cystic fibrosis may be one of the most common hereditary diseases because carriers of the faulty gene have an enhanced natural resistance to typhoid, U.S. doctors report in Nature. The finding could explain why the defective gene is passed on to subsequent generations. Cystic fibrosis occurs when a child has two defective copies of the gene, one from each parent, that encodes a protein known as cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR).
HEALTH
September 2, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL
If the woman in this picture has a sour expression, who can blame her? For 26 years, she was held captive on a small island in New York's East River. Health officials kept her there because they said she was making people sick--a charge that the woman, Mary Mallon, viewed as utterly outrageous. She'd never hurt a fly, she insisted. She'd merely tried to earn a living as a cook. Mary Mallon was the original "Typhoid Mary," one of the first identified healthy carriers of a disease.
NEWS
February 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Letters recovered from the ocean floor at the wreck of the Titanic were written by the great-grandmother and great-aunt of a man who learned of the connection from a television documentary. Barbara Shuttle was watching a Discovery Channel special, "Titanic, The Anatomy of a Disaster," in April when she noticed the name "Mrs. Shuttle" signed at the bottom of a yellowed letter that was illustrated. It had been found in a trunk on the ocean floor.
NEWS
August 21, 1993 | Reuters
Nearly 200 people have been hospitalized with suspected typhoid, the latest of a string of infectious diseases to break out in Russia, the government said Friday. An official government bulletin said 195 people, including 68 children, have been hospitalized in Volgodonsk, southern Russia. Typhoid, an infectious bacterial disease that attacks the intestine, had been confirmed in 139 cases. The bulletin said measures were being taken to prevent the outbreak from spreading, but gave no details.
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