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BUSINESS
June 26, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Tyson Foods Inc., the biggest U.S. meat processor, and Syntroleum Corp. formed a joint venture to produce fuel from animal fat and vegetable oil in response to growing demand for energy from renewable sources. The venture's first project will be a $150-million plant that can produce 75 million gallons a year of synthetic fuel for the renewable diesel, jet and military markets, the companies said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 20, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
American meat giant Tyson Foods cut ties with an Oklahoma pork farm Wednesday almost immediately after the release of an activist's undercover video showed brutal abuses of pigs at the facility. The highly edited video , its contents graphic and disturbing, was released by Los Angeles-based animal-rights group Mercy for Animals. It showed short clips of men grabbing piglets by their hind legs and smashing their heads to the ground to kill them. Other clips showed men kicking pigs in the face and hitting the animals with boards and a bowling ball.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Tyson Foods Inc., the largest U.S. meat processor, said Monday that its fiscal first-quarter profit plunged 40% on beef losses and higher corn costs. Earnings were better than analysts expected, and its shares rose the most in three weeks. Net income for the three months ended Dec. 29 fell to $34 million, or 10 cents a share, from $57 million, or 16 cents, a year earlier. Sales rose 3.2% to $6.8 billion. Tyson said corn-feed prices are the highest ever as U.S. mandates for ethanol led to record demand for the crop-based fuel.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The president and chief executive of the Humane Society of the United States says he wants a seat on the board of directors at Tyson Foods so he can begin working from the inside-out to improve the plight of farm animals -- especially pregnant pigs. Let that sink in for a second. The head of one of the world's largest animal-rights organizations wants to help oversee one of the world's biggest meat producers.  Wayne Pacelle said in a statement posted on the Humane Society's website that he has filed paperwork as a candidate for election to the board of directors of Tyson Foods.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2004 | From Associated Press
Tyson Foods Inc., the world's largest meat producer, said Monday that regulators were conducting a formal investigation of benefits received by some board members and company executives. The Securities and Exchange Commission was "seeking information primarily with respect to the disclosure of perquisites provided to certain directors and officers of the company," including former Senior Chairman Don Tyson and current Chairman and Chief Executive John Tyson, Springdale, Ark.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2001 | Associated Press
Tyson Foods Inc., the world's largest poultry producer, called off a $3.2-billion purchase of IBP Inc. that would have made it the nation's top beef and pork producer. The decision was announced nine days after IBP said an investigation into its appetizer unit, DFG Foods, uncovered potential manipulation of financial records, product theft and mismanagement by former unit managers. IBP said it was shocked by Tyson's announcement. Shares of Tyson shot up $3.15 to $14.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc. said Chief Executive Wayne Britt stepped down as head of the nation's top chicken producer and was replaced by Chairman John Tyson, grandson of the company's founder. The 50-year-old Britt held the top job at the Springdale, Ark.-based company for 1 1/2 years, during which Tyson's stock plunged 50%. Like other U.S. chicken producers, Tyson was hurt by a poultry glut and low prices.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Tyson Foods Inc. on Monday posted a $52-million loss in its fiscal third quarter and a 5% dip in sales, which the world's largest meat processor said were market pangs that should be over in time, possibly by next spring. But analysts looking at the results weren't as optimistic. They predicted continued losses in the company's final fiscal quarter that ends in September.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Securities and Exchange Commission staff plans to seek a civil enforcement action and possible monetary penalties against Tyson Foods Inc. over benefits the company paid some executives, Tyson Foods said late Monday. The world's largest meat producer also said its former senior chairman had repaid the company $1.5 million. Springdale, Ark.-based Tyson disclosed in March that the agency was investigating company benefit payments, and said that it was cooperating with the probe.
OPINION
December 20, 2003
The Times gave front-page coverage to a former Tyson Foods employee who makes completely unsubstantiated claims about our treatment of animals ("A Killing Floor Chronicle," Dec. 8). As your extensive correction of Dec. 13 makes clear, the former employee repeatedly lied about the most basic facts of his life, claiming to have served in military combat and to have murdered a man, neither of which is true. Your correction should give pause to any who are tempted to believe the baseless allegations of radical animal activists.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2010 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: My husband and I own shares of Tyson Foods Inc. Can they continue to do as well as they have been doing, or is the run over? Answer: The world's largest meat company, with leading positions in the processing of beef, chicken and pork, is benefiting from more Americans cooking at home. Processors had reduced their production in 2008 because of higher feed costs and the economic slowdown, with the resulting lower supply now leading to higher meat prices. Shares of Tyson Foods (TSN)
BUSINESS
November 23, 2009
At a glance TODAY National Assn. of Realtors releases existing home sales for September. Quarterly earnings reports due from Hewlett-Packard, Campbell Soup and Tyson Foods. TUESDAY Standard & Poor's/Case- Shiller releases its September and third-quarter index of home prices. Conference Board releases its Consumer Confidence Index for November. Commerce Department releases gross domestic product for the third quarter of 2009. Federal Housing Finance Agency releases September and third-quarter home price index.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Services
Tyson Foods Inc. said its president and chief executive, Dick Bond, would step down immediately and be replaced by a former CEO as the world's largest meat processor continues to weather a downturn in the industry. Bond, who had been CEO since 2006, will be replaced on an interim basis by former Chairman and Chief Executive Leland Tollett, the Springdale, Ark., company said. Tollett was CEO from 1995 until he retired in 1998 after nearly 40 years with the company.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2008 | Times Wire Services
Tyson Foods Inc. missed analysts' fiscal fourth-quarter profit estimates and predicted a possible first-quarter loss. Tyson Chief Executive Richard L. Bond said the company was facing "multiple challenges," including high grain-feed costs and an oversupply of chicken. For its fourth quarter ended Sept. 27, net income rose 50% to $48 million, or 13 cents a share, from $32 million, or 9 cents, a year earlier.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Russia, the top market for U.S. chicken exports, said it would ban poultry from at least 19 plants that it said ignored warnings about inspections. Companies affected, including Springdale, Ark.-based Tyson Foods Inc., vowed to right any wrongs if need be. The industry's trade group said it had been expecting Russia to reduce imports anyway as the country's own production rises. Plants affected include at least two owned by Tyson; two owned by Sanderson Farms Inc., the nation's fourth-largest chicken producer; and a Jennie-O Turkey plant owned by Hormel Foods Inc.
NATIONAL
June 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Tyson Foods Inc. has begun killing and burying 15,000 hens that tested positive for exposure to bird flu, state officials said in Little Rock. Tyson said preliminary tests indicated the presence of antibodies for H7N3, a less virulent strain of the virus than H5N1, which ravaged Asian poultry in 2003 and has killed 240 people worldwide since then. "There is absolutely no human health threat," said Jon Fitch, director of the state Livestock and Poultry Commission. "But we take this very seriously."
BUSINESS
January 13, 1998 | Associated Press
Tyson Foods Inc. will pay $4 million in fines and must meet terms of four years' probation or risk losing government business following its guilty plea to giving former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy $12,000 in favors. U.S. District Judge Ricardo Urbina in Washington also directed that the Arkansas-based poultry producer pay $2 million to cover the costs of an investigation by independent counsel Donald C. Smaltz.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2000 | BARENDAN MURRAY, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Tyson Foods Inc., the biggest U.S. poultry producer, escalated a bidding contest for IBP Inc. on Monday by offering $2.8 billion in cash and stock for the nation's No. 1 beef supplier. IBP investors would get $26 for each IBP share, half in cash and half in Tyson stock. The bid is 17% higher than an October buyout offer from IBP managers and 4% more than an all-stock, $25-a-share bid last month by Smithfield Foods Inc., the top U.S. pork producer. Under each deal, the buyer also would assume $1.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tyson Foods Inc., the second-largest U.S. chicken producer, said it would discontinue its "Raised Without Antibiotics" label because of uncertainty over regulations. Tyson has asked the Department of Agriculture to clarify labeling and advertising rules, the Springdale, Ark.-based company said. A federal judge ordered Tyson in April to halt ads touting chicken as being "raised without antibiotics" after finding the claims to be misleading.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Tyson Foods Inc., the largest U.S. meat processor, said Monday that its fiscal first-quarter profit plunged 40% on beef losses and higher corn costs. Earnings were better than analysts expected, and its shares rose the most in three weeks. Net income for the three months ended Dec. 29 fell to $34 million, or 10 cents a share, from $57 million, or 16 cents, a year earlier. Sales rose 3.2% to $6.8 billion. Tyson said corn-feed prices are the highest ever as U.S. mandates for ethanol led to record demand for the crop-based fuel.
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