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Tyson Foods

BUSINESS
December 16, 2007 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
When James Rice first arrived in southern China in 1987, locals flocked to get a closer look at the 6-foot-1, 185-pound Californian with brown hair and hazel eyes. Most people in remote Yunnan province had never seen a white man before, so when they caught up with him as he glided on "speedy shoes," as they called his rollerblades, some would pinch his skin or touch his long legs. Twenty years later, 20 pounds heavier and white streaks over his brush-cut hair, Rice still draws a crowd in China.
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BUSINESS
June 26, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Tyson Foods Inc., the biggest U.S. meat processor, and Syntroleum Corp. formed a joint venture to produce fuel from animal fat and vegetable oil in response to growing demand for energy from renewable sources. The venture's first project will be a $150-million plant that can produce 75 million gallons a year of synthetic fuel for the renewable diesel, jet and military markets, the companies said.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc. slashed the pay of Chairman John Tyson and Chief Executive Richard Bond by withholding bonuses after the meat company suffered its first full-year loss in 12 years. John Tyson, 53, who stepped down as CEO in May after serving in that position since 2001, was paid $2.1 million for the year ended Sept. 30. That was down 62% from the previous year when the company had net income of $372 million and Tyson received a $3.2-million bonus. Bond's pay was cut 68% to $1.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Tyson Foods Inc. on Monday posted a $52-million loss in its fiscal third quarter and a 5% dip in sales, which the world's largest meat processor said were market pangs that should be over in time, possibly by next spring. But analysts looking at the results weren't as optimistic. They predicted continued losses in the company's final fiscal quarter that ends in September.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Tyson Foods Inc., the world's largest meat processor, said the shutdown of four plants in Mississippi because of Hurricane Katrina would cost the company $10 million to $20 million. The estimate reflects lost production from the shutdowns, the loss of some live birds and the loss of frozen products that were in storage in Mississippi and Louisiana, Springdale, Ark.-based Tyson said.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Securities and Exchange Commission staff plans to seek a civil enforcement action and possible monetary penalties against Tyson Foods Inc. over benefits the company paid some executives, Tyson Foods said late Monday. The world's largest meat producer also said its former senior chairman had repaid the company $1.5 million. Springdale, Ark.-based Tyson disclosed in March that the agency was investigating company benefit payments, and said that it was cooperating with the probe.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2004 | From Associated Press
Tyson Foods Inc., the world's largest meat producer, said Monday that regulators were conducting a formal investigation of benefits received by some board members and company executives. The Securities and Exchange Commission was "seeking information primarily with respect to the disclosure of perquisites provided to certain directors and officers of the company," including former Senior Chairman Don Tyson and current Chairman and Chief Executive John Tyson, Springdale, Ark.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2004 | From Reuters
Tyson Foods Inc., the world's largest meat processor, must pay $1.28 billion to cattle ranchers, according to a federal jury verdict Tuesday that said the firm manipulated the cattle market and would have to change its buying practices. The ruling by the Montgomery, Ala., jury in the 8-year-old case could have a far-reaching effect on the $70-billion U.S. beef industry.
OPINION
December 20, 2003
The Times gave front-page coverage to a former Tyson Foods employee who makes completely unsubstantiated claims about our treatment of animals ("A Killing Floor Chronicle," Dec. 8). As your extensive correction of Dec. 13 makes clear, the former employee repeatedly lied about the most basic facts of his life, claiming to have served in military combat and to have murdered a man, neither of which is true. Your correction should give pause to any who are tempted to believe the baseless allegations of radical animal activists.
OPINION
December 13, 2003
Re "A Killing Floor Chronicle," Dec. 8: Denials by Tyson Foods of the horrors perpetrated in its chicken slaughterhouses, as recounted by a former worker, as well as the shrug-and-yawn findings of "no corroboration" by authorities ostensibly charged with oversight, is an old story -- at least as old as Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" and the chorus of virtuous denials from the meatpacking industry that greeted its publication. Virgil Butler's Web log and his work of personal witnessing may do as much for vegetarianism as did the work of the estimable Sinclair, by continuing to send a simple message of truth: This is what you are really eating.
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