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Tyson Foods

BUSINESS
September 21, 1999 | (Associated Press)
Tyson Foods Inc., the nation's largest poultry producer, said it will begin using electricity to treat some of its products for contamination by zapping bacteria so it cannot reproduce. Springdale, Ark.-based Tyson said its decision to institute the program was consumer-driven. Tyson has contracted with San Diego-based Titan Corp. to use electron beams generated from regular electrical currents. Tyson says a market test could come early next year.
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NEWS
March 9, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has been one of the most vilified special prosecutors of the last 20 years, attacked by other lawyers and critics as misguided, overbearing and excessively ambitious. His name, however, is not Kenneth W. Starr. Until the recent furor enveloped Starr's investigation of President Clinton, another independent counsel, Donald C. Smaltz, had been a lightning rod for similar, and equally harsh, criticism.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1998 | Associated Press
Tyson Foods Inc. will pay $4 million in fines and must meet terms of four years' probation or risk losing government business following its guilty plea to giving former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy $12,000 in favors. U.S. District Judge Ricardo Urbina in Washington also directed that the Arkansas-based poultry producer pay $2 million to cover the costs of an investigation by independent counsel Donald C. Smaltz.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1997 | SHARON WALSH, WASHINGTON POST
Tyson Foods Inc., the country's largest poultry producer, said Thursday that it will buy Hudson Foods Inc. for $642.4 million. The purchase comes just weeks after Hudson recalled a record 25 million pounds of hamburger and shut down its beef production facility because of contamination by E. coli bacteria.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1996 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal grand jury on Tuesday indicted a Washington lobbyist for Tyson Foods Inc. on charges that he lied to federal investigators about gifts the company provided to former Agriculture Secretary Mike Espy's girlfriend and to a former Agriculture Department official. The two-count indictment against Jack L. Williams was the first brought by independent counsel Donald C. Smaltz involving Tyson Foods, the Arkansas-based poultry giant that had been a major supporter of President Clinton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1995
I object to the interpretive "news analysis" by Times staff writer Paul Richter on President Clinton's decision-making style (July 15). On the other side of the story, Richter fails to ask whether the perception of Clinton's "weakness" is a cheap-shot absurdity. Hardly a phrase in Richter's article gave real credit to the importance of taking time to make decisions and to consider all options and arguments. These are strengths in my view, rare qualities among recent Presidents. Reagan made fast, honest, sentimental decisions (about the Contras, for example)
NEWS
July 21, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning vote of no confidence, the two most important Arkansas financial sponsors of President Clinton's political career--Don Tyson of Tyson Foods Inc. and the powerful Stephens banking family of Little Rock--have turned their backs on the Clinton reelection effort and are supporting Sen. Bob Dole's candidacy. Tyson's political action committee has already contributed $3,000 to Dole's campaign, while the Stephens Inc.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | SUSAN SCHMIDT, WASHINGTON POST
Imagine two of the longest airport runways in America, side by side. On one, a 747 carrying a full load of cargo is taxiing toward takeoff for Japan. Another 747 is jetting in from the Pacific Rim. Is this the new Denver airport? LAX? Not quite. Right now it's just a collection of chicken farms 70 miles off the nearest interstate in northwest Arkansas. But some of the country's most powerful and politically connected families hope to transform this rural setting into a bustling airport that eventually could become a cargo gateway to Asia and fuel the local economy.
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