Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsU Haul International Inc
IN THE NEWS

U Haul International Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 23, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Complaint Against U-Haul Ads Referred to FTC: In an unusual move, the National Advertising Review Board, the advertising industry's self-regulatory agency, referred to the Federal Trade Commission a complaint against the company's advertised "guaranteed reservations" claims. The board said it made the referral after U-Haul International Inc. failed to indicate that it would comply with the board's recommendation to quit using the potentially misleading claim in its Yellow Pages ads.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 19, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Amerco's U-Haul International Inc. must pay $84 million to a man who was injured when the truck he rented ran over him, a Texas jury said Friday. The man, Talmadge Waldrip, 74, parked the truck on a "slight incline" and the parking brake failed, said his attorney, Ted Lyon. Waldrip said U-Haul failed to maintain the truck, causing the accident. "The truck's parking brake did not work at all," Lyon said. "He stepped out of the truck and it rolled right over him."
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
U-Haul Gets Financing: A group of 11 investors provided $102.5 million in financing to the parent company of U-Haul International Inc. as the company struggles to whittle down a huge outstanding debt. "This financing allows us to continue as a healthy, viable company," said E. J. Shoen, president of U-Haul and chairman of the parent company Amerco. Shoen refused to say how much debt would be paid or the total amount of debt outstanding.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A King County jury has awarded $15.5 million to a Renton woman who was disfigured and blinded in February 2004 when part of an entertainment center flew from a rented U-Haul trailer and crashed through her windshield. Maria Federici's lawyers had sought $38 million in damages. Jurors found U-Haul most liable, ordering it to pay two-thirds of the award, and said the driver who was towing the entertainment center, James Hefley, should pay the rest.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Judge OKs Settlement in U-Haul Case: Federal Bankruptcy Judge James M. Marlar approved a plan by the board of Amerco Inc., corporate parent of U-Haul International Inc. of Phoenix, to pay the remaining $313.8 million owed on a judgment in favor of U-Haul founder Leonard S. Shoen and six of his children. The judge's decision settles a family feud that began in 1986 when Joe and Mark Shoen forced their father, now 79, into early retirement and began a push to control the company.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Amerco's U-Haul International Inc. must pay $84 million to a man who was injured when the truck he rented ran over him, a Texas jury said Friday. The man, Talmadge Waldrip, 74, parked the truck on a "slight incline" and the parking brake failed, said his attorney, Ted Lyon. Waldrip said U-Haul failed to maintain the truck, causing the accident. "The truck's parking brake did not work at all," Lyon said. "He stepped out of the truck and it rolled right over him."
BUSINESS
January 10, 2001 | Lisa Girion
U-Haul International Inc. is considering appealing a Los Angeles court decision that 480 current and former employees were improperly classified as managers and denied overtime wages, said Bill Kannow, an attorney representing the Phoenix-based company. In a hearing set for April, the plaintiffs will argue they are owed more than $10 million in overtime pay, said Matthew A. Kaufman, an attorney representing the current and former employees participating in the class-action lawsuit.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Amerco, parent of U-Haul International Inc., sued PricewaterhouseCoopers for $2.5 billion Monday, accusing the world's largest accounting firm of providing bad advice that nearly led to bankruptcy. Reno-based Amerco said Pricewaterhouse structured off-the-books entities to help U-Haul legally avoid putting real estate-related losses on its books.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
Online pop-up ads do not violate trademark laws even if they cover up or appear alongside unaffiliated Web sites, including those of rivals, a federal judge has ruled. U.S. District Judge Gerald Bruce Lee also placed some of the responsibility for those ads on computer users, saying they voluntarily agree to them, even if they do so unwittingly. Lee's ruling Friday came in a lawsuit filed last year by U-Haul International Inc. against WhenU.com, a company blamed for some of the pop-ups.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the early hours of Aug. 6, Eva Berg Shoen, 44, was shot to death with a .25-caliber pistol as she slept in her deluxe log home, set amid aspen and spruce trees outside the rustic, 1880s-vintage ski town of Telluride. Investigators were stumped. The shooting smacked of a professional hit. But why, nervous townspeople wondered, would anyone kill this pleasant, blonde, Norwegian-born woman who had moved with her family to the area for its small-town atmosphere?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2007 | Alan C. Miller and Myron Levin, Times Staff Writers
U-Haul International Inc., the nation's leading provider of rental trailers and trucks, is inspecting its vehicles more frequently since The Times raised questions about the company's maintenance practices earlier this year, according to employees, managers and dealers. Interviews, internal bulletins and a recent field survey of U-Haul equipment indicated that management is pushing employees and dealers to be more vigilant about inspections.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2007 | Myron Levin, Times Staff Writer
U-HAUL INTERNATIONAL INC. has had its share of courtroom dramas, but none quite like one involving its corporate sister, Oxford Life Insurance Co. When Oxford balked at paying a modest claim from a badly injured policyholder, it was hammered with a $39-million verdict. The judge denounced Oxford's conduct as the worst he'd ever seen. The policyholder, West Virginia farmer Charles Kocher, had long wanted a Ford pickup.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2007 | Myron Levin and Alan C. Miller, Times Staff Writers
PINNED inside an overturned Ford Explorer on Interstate 5 in Bakersfield, Gabriel Koloszar looked up to see her friend Paulo Aguilar hanging unconscious from his seat belt, his blood dripping down on her. Rescuers pulled Koloszar out through the windshield. When she tried to stand, another passenger cried out: "Oh my God, Gabby. Your feet!" Only then, she recalled, did she look down to see her mangled flesh.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2007 | Myron Levin and Alan C. Miller, Times Staff Writers
U-HAUL CUSTOMERS who have seethed over botched reservations were vindicated last year when a California judge ruled that the company had engaged in "unlawful and fraudulent business practices." Ruling in a class action, Santa Cruz County Superior Court Judge Samuel S. Stevens struck at U-Haul's practice of booking reservations for trucks and trailers without knowing if it will have the equipment when and where customers need it.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2007
U-HAUL IS MOSTLY self-regulating when it comes to towing safety -- thanks largely to an aggressive campaign it led against proposed federal rules in the late 1960s and early '70s. The safety standards would have governed trailer hitches and couplings and would have set minimum requirements for informing customers of towing risks. They were inspired in part by the so-called Route 66 study by traffic expert J.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2007 | Alan C. Miller and Myron Levin, Times Staff Writers
THE HEAD of one of America's most famous companies was barreling down a suburban thoroughfare at 80 mph, with no hands on the wheel and a U-Haul trailer in tow. "There's no magic to this," Edward J. "Joe" Shoen, chairman of U-Haul International Inc., told stunned passengers in his Lincoln Town Car. "A trailer wants to trail." Undaunted by the 118-degree heat, Shoen had set out to show two Times reporters that towing U-Haul equipment is perfectly safe -- unless the customer screws up.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1992 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The self-storage business, by most accounts, is doing nicely these days. Demand for mini-warehouse space is gradually rising, and the average facility is 80% to 90% full. Rental prices also are edging higher. The market is strengthening because few new self-storage sites are being built. Banks and other lenders, burned lately by commercial loans that went sour, are particularly reluctant to finance self-storage facilities, of which there are already more than 20,000 nationwide.
MAGAZINE
February 17, 1991 | ALAN PRENDERGAST, Alan Prendergast, a Denver-based free-lancer, wrote "The Poison Tree" (Avon)
'EXCUSE ME. My mom--I woke up, she's dead on the staircase." The dispatcher at the San Miguel County Sheriff's Office wasn't sure she'd heard it right. The voice on the line was that of a little girl, whimpering something about her mother. "She's sick?" "She's dead on the staircase! There's blood, OK?" "What is your name?" "Bente Shoen. I live in the Ski Ranches--in a big log house. There was blood on the bed. Please send somebody." "OK. You said she's not alive now?"
NATIONAL
June 24, 2007 | Alan C. Miller and Myron Levin, Times Staff Writers
MARISSA STERNBERG sits in her wheelchair, barely able to move or speak. Caregivers are always at her side. Progress is measured in tiny steps: an unclenched fist, a look of recognition, a smile for her father. Nearly four years ago, Sternberg was a high-spirited 19-year-old bound for veterinary school in Denver. She rented a U-Haul trailer to move her belongings, hitched it to her Toyota Land Cruiser and hit the road with her two dogs and a friend.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
Online pop-up ads do not violate trademark laws even if they cover up or appear alongside unaffiliated Web sites, including those of rivals, a federal judge has ruled. U.S. District Judge Gerald Bruce Lee also placed some of the responsibility for those ads on computer users, saying they voluntarily agree to them, even if they do so unwittingly. Lee's ruling Friday came in a lawsuit filed last year by U-Haul International Inc. against WhenU.com, a company blamed for some of the pop-ups.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|