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U Kyaw Win

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NEWS
May 21, 1991 | Dianne Klein
U Kyaw Win is a small man only by the physical standards of his exile home, the United States. He is sitting behind a desk strewn with books and papers in a tiny office cubicle at Orange Coast College. Here he counsels students about what to do with their lives, about how to make choices that they will not regret. Sticking out from his shirt pocket is dark green plastic: His savings passbook from the bank.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1993
U Kyaw Win ("Myanmar's Fight for Democracy," Feb. 23) is my colleague, and I know his pay as a faculty member at a community college is not large. Still he shares a large part of his salary and a greater part of his energy to support the cause of democracy in Myanmar. Although he could live a comfortable life in the United States without thoughts of Myanmar's suffering minorities, Win puts his money where his ideals are: in support of individual freedom. We Americans, despite our problems, know we live in a great country, and from its relative safety we can easily ignore the problems of Myanmar over 8,000 miles away.
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NEWS
February 23, 1993 | JANE STEVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
U Kyaw Win squints through the road's billowing dust and utters a loud moan--"MMMMMMM!"--into a cloth he holds over his mouth and nose. He braces himself in the back of a pickup truck as it careens sharply down a steep embankment and jounces, for the umpteenth time, across another wide stream. "This is the same stream," he yells incredulously. "We cross it 30 times."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1988
Re "An Emotional Visit Home: Vietnam--13 Years Later" (Feb. 23): Moving! Absolutely moving! Ho Van Xuan Nhi's account of returning to his homeland hit me hard, as it must surely have hit countless others who have had to uproot themselves from the soil that nurtured them. May the wounds of war heal, and may many more Indochinese and others be permitted to re-establish bonds with loved ones in their ancestral homelands. This prayer for the Year of the Dragon comes from an exile who has not been permitted to set foot on his homeland of Burma since March, 1961.
NEWS
September 29, 1985
It is indeed refreshing and encouraging to learn from a 29-year-old member of the Saudi royal family that he does not believe in passports and visas ("A Saudi Prince Comes Home From the Stars" by Kathleen Hendrix, Sept. 19). Perhaps the young prince should be the prime mover in opening the doors of his family's kingdom to non-Muslims who just wish to visit and get acquainted with the land and its people. U KYAW WIN Laguna Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1986
Goodwin's retraction of his earlier mistaken stance supporting the Libyan raid was an act of courage. I am reminded of an ancient Chinese method of settling disputes wherein the village elders would summon the contentious parties to the commons. Each party would state its case. A debate would ensue in the presence of citizens of the village who would act as judges. But there was one injunction: "The one who strikes the first blow is the loser. For he (she) has run out of ideas."
OPINION
March 4, 1990
In response to "Havel: A Man in Search of an Ideal," editorial, Feb. 23: At a time when changes undreamed of are taking place in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union and South Africa, where the human spirit has long been frustrated from keeping its tryst with destiny, here appears Czechoslovakia's Havel with a soul-stirring message. Raising questions so profound about our own democracy at a time when over a billion people in Burma and China are denied their God-given rights, your editorial gave flight to my spirit.
NEWS
February 21, 1993
This is the story of the 44-year-long civil war in Myanmar, formerly Burma, as seen through the eyes of U Kyaw Win, 59, a Burmese-American Orange Coast College counselor who left his homeland three decades ago because the country was headed in the wrong direction under a repressive military government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1988
Re Rep.-elect Dana Rohrabacher's visit to Burma: Rohrabacher did not enter Burma illegally. That portion of Burma known as Kawthoolei, the liberated state under the jurisdiction of the Karen National Union, requires no visas and is beyond the reach of Dictator Ne Win's tyrannical writ. I commend Rohrabacher for taking the initiative to see for himself the other side of the 40-year-old civil war in Burma in which the Karens, Kachins, Shans, Karennis, Mons and now the students and others have been struggling for freedom and democracy.
NEWS
February 22, 1993 | JANE STEVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Seven disheveled, emaciated men squat wearily on their heels. Their eyes, sunken in drawn faces, stare at the ground. Intent upon forgetting their ordeals, they offer as few subdued words as possible to the man who is questioning them. Yes, they know exactly how long they served the soldiers of Myanmar's State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC). One month and 13 days. Yes, they were abducted from their village in the Shan state, far to the north, against their will.
NEWS
February 21, 1993
This is the story of the 44-year-long civil war in Myanmar, formerly Burma, as seen through the eyes of U Kyaw Win, 59, a Burmese-American Orange Coast College counselor who left his homeland three decades ago because the country was headed in the wrong direction under a repressive military government.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | JANE STEVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The man who has a death grip on the wooden gunwales of a long-tail boat roaring up the Moei River between Thailand and Myanmar seems a marvel of inconsistencies. One moment, he will bark at his wife or daughter, "Don't ask stupid questions!" The next, he will plant a kiss on his wife's cheek in thanks for bringing his 28-year-old daughter, Dewi, into the world. He is vain enough to pay to have his graying hair tinted so artfully that it is difficult to spot the dye job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange Coast College counselor who has struggled to help free his native Myanmar from a repressive military regime said Monday that Aung San Suu Kyi's Nobel Peace Prize would bring international attention to his country's fight for freedom. "This is good for the country, good for the Burmese. I am very elated, and I am hopeful that it will turn around the situation with that country," said U Kyaw Win, who publishes the Burma Bulletin Newsletter out of his Laguna Hills home.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | Dianne Klein
U Kyaw Win is a small man only by the physical standards of his exile home, the United States. He is sitting behind a desk strewn with books and papers in a tiny office cubicle at Orange Coast College. Here he counsels students about what to do with their lives, about how to make choices that they will not regret. Sticking out from his shirt pocket is dark green plastic: His savings passbook from the bank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1993
U Kyaw Win ("Myanmar's Fight for Democracy," Feb. 23) is my colleague, and I know his pay as a faculty member at a community college is not large. Still he shares a large part of his salary and a greater part of his energy to support the cause of democracy in Myanmar. Although he could live a comfortable life in the United States without thoughts of Myanmar's suffering minorities, Win puts his money where his ideals are: in support of individual freedom. We Americans, despite our problems, know we live in a great country, and from its relative safety we can easily ignore the problems of Myanmar over 8,000 miles away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1988
Your editorial "The Snake in Burma's Grass"(Aug. 24) was right on target. Military overlord Ne Win, who has ruled Burma for the past 26 years with an iron fist, has "resigned" for the second time. When he resigned from the presidency of Burma several years ago, he retained the chairmanship of his party--the Burma Socialist Program Party--the only legal political organization under the 1974 Constitution. As chairman, he maintained total control of his party and its government. On July 23, he resigned the chairmanship of the party.
OPINION
March 4, 1990
In response to "Havel: A Man in Search of an Ideal," editorial, Feb. 23: At a time when changes undreamed of are taking place in Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union and South Africa, where the human spirit has long been frustrated from keeping its tryst with destiny, here appears Czechoslovakia's Havel with a soul-stirring message. Raising questions so profound about our own democracy at a time when over a billion people in Burma and China are denied their God-given rights, your editorial gave flight to my spirit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1988
Re Rep.-elect Dana Rohrabacher's visit to Burma: Rohrabacher did not enter Burma illegally. That portion of Burma known as Kawthoolei, the liberated state under the jurisdiction of the Karen National Union, requires no visas and is beyond the reach of Dictator Ne Win's tyrannical writ. I commend Rohrabacher for taking the initiative to see for himself the other side of the 40-year-old civil war in Burma in which the Karens, Kachins, Shans, Karennis, Mons and now the students and others have been struggling for freedom and democracy.
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