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June 24, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When I was young," says Jamaican deejay U-Roy, "I didn't think I would ever live in the United States." When asked just how he came from the Kingston ghetto of his youth to an apartment complex in Santa Ana, he is a little hazy on the details. He has some music business friends in Los Angeles and, well, he just kind of settled in about five years ago. He does his best to simulate some of the comforts of home. Every morning, for instance, he drives to Newport Beach to shop for fresh fish.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When I was young," says Jamaican deejay and recording star U-Roy, "I didn't think I would ever live in the United States." When asked just how he came from the Kingston ghetto of his youth to an apartment complex in Santa Ana, he is a little hazy on details. He has music business friends in Los Angeles and, well, he just kind of settled in about five years ago. He does his best to simulate some comforts of home. Every morning, for instance, he drives to Newport Beach to shop for fresh fish.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When I was young," says Jamaican deejay and recording star U-Roy, "I didn't think I would ever live in the United States." When asked just how he came from the Kingston ghetto of his youth to an apartment complex in Santa Ana, he is a little hazy on details. He has music business friends in Los Angeles and, well, he just kind of settled in about five years ago. He does his best to simulate some comforts of home. Every morning, for instance, he drives to Newport Beach to shop for fresh fish.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When I was young," says Jamaican deejay U-Roy, "I didn't think I would ever live in the United States." When asked just how he came from the Kingston ghetto of his youth to an apartment complex in Santa Ana, he is a little hazy on the details. He has some music business friends in Los Angeles and, well, he just kind of settled in about five years ago. He does his best to simulate some of the comforts of home. Every morning, for instance, he drives to Newport Beach to shop for fresh fish.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
U-Roy was one of the early '70s Jamaican deejays who pioneered "toasting"--a style of talk-singing over records or rhythm tracks that was a precursor of rap--but his career faded soon after reggae's late-'70s surge to international attention. The veteran artist recently resurfaced as Daddy U-Roy, and his hourlong set Sunday before an enthusiastic crowd at the plush Strand club in Redondo Beach was an impressive comeback.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1997
Much of what Don Snowden considers "revitalized" reggae is nothing of the kind ("The New Toasts of Reggae," April 27). While such artists as Luciano stay essentially true to the music's roots, Bounty Killer and those like him have about as much to do with reggae as Pat Boone does with heavy metal! Whereas original Jamaican toasters like U Roy focused on such themes as repatriation and cultural identity, the look, sound and lyrical content of Bounty Killer et al clearly indicate the category to which they truly belong: rap. Want to hear some vital reggae?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
If the Greek was an indoor theater, Shinehead's opening reggae-rap-rock salvo "Unity" would have torn the roof off at Saturday's "Reggae Sunsplash" concert. The lanky New Yorker electrified the crowd's spirit of amiable anarchy by strolling through the audience (unescorted by security guards) during a sparkling set that again confirmed his enormous potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1991 | By JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If Ziggy Marley or any of the other new generation reggae performers ever come up short on material, perhaps they could take a cue from country music mavericks like Hank Williams Jr. and Waylon Jennings and start writing songs looking inward at the music itself. Reggae lyrics do fine at skating the spiritual plane or damning apartheid, but the Jamaican-born music has hit such a doldrums that songs asking "Don't You Think This Rasta Bit's Done Got Out of Hand?"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1996 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Local reggae fans have already enjoyed a steady stream of formidable musical talent via the usual summer reggae festivals. But this Sunday's concert headlined by Luciano and the Wailing Souls at Malibu's Calamigos Ranch will have another beneficiary: children. Not only will kids 12 and under be allowed in free to the day's "family style" event, with its sideshow of games, swimming, animals and a merry-go-round, but proceeds are slated to go to children's programs in both Los Angeles and Jamaica.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
It may be time for the record industry to look seriously at reggae again. The Jamaican style, spearheaded by the late Bob Marley, was touted as a "next big thing" 15 years ago, but it failed to make a pop breakthrough and was soon pigeonholed as a cult music. For many fans, the last hope ended with Marley's death in 1981. To them, Marley was reggae.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
U-Roy was one of the early '70s Jamaican deejays who pioneered "toasting"--a style of talk-singing over records or rhythm tracks that was a precursor of rap--but his career faded soon after reggae's late-'70s surge to international attention. The veteran artist recently resurfaced as Daddy U-Roy, and his hourlong set Sunday before an enthusiastic crowd at the plush Strand club in Redondo Beach was an impressive comeback.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1988 | MIKE BOEHM, Times Staff Writer
The Coach House, the leading club in Orange County for touring pop talent, will try to build an audience for home-grown music with twice-monthly bills featuring local rock groups. The first show, Dec. 23, will feature two bands from Orange County, Wood and Smoke and Imagining Yellow Suns, along with a Los Angeles group, One Day. "We'll give 'em decent days and keep the ticket prices down and see if we can make it work," said Ken Phebus, the Coach House's booking agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2000
The reggae, ska and rock-steady sounds of the '70s and early '80s are the order of the day at the fourth annual Reggae Old School Jam, a nine-hour festival featuring Barrington Levy, Leroy Sibbles, Johnny Clarke, Linval Thompson, Michigan & Smiley, Mikey "Mac Daddy" Jarrett and Justin Hinds & the Dominoes. Daddy U-Roy will receive a special award during the concert. * Reggae Old School Jam, Queen Mary Park, Long Beach, noon. $25 in advance, $30 at door, children under 12 free. (310) 515-3322.
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