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U S 101 Freeway

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2003 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Despite vociferous community opposition, a committee of transportation planners recommended Tuesday a $3.36-billion effort to improve and widen the 101 Freeway, a project that could require the leveling of some homes and businesses. The proposal calls for at least two new lanes in each direction along 31 miles of the freeway corridor between Thousand Oaks and Studio City.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2002 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To gather more public comment on ways to improve the 101 Freeway, transportation officials will hold the first in a series of workshops today. Transportation officials and engineers plan to present preliminary drawings and speak individually with those attending the workshops, which are part of an ongoing study of the 40-mile freeway corridor from downtown Los Angeles to Thousand Oaks. The $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2002 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The next big step in the Santa Clara River Bridge expansion project on the Ventura Freeway is scheduled to start Friday, as workers begin installing the 65-foot cement shafts that will buttress the new span. Although two pile drivers will operate within about 10 feet of the northbound slow lane of the freeway at Ventura Road, cement barriers topped with plywood planks will separate the construction zone from traffic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2002 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Transportation officials on Tuesday announced their top options to alleviate congestion on the 101 Freeway: widening the roadway, double-decking to create carpool lanes and erecting an elevated rail line. Narrowed down from an earlier list of 12, one of the proposals--or some combination of the three--will become the final strategy. That decision could be made as early as December. "We have a good set of options going forward," said Laurie Newman, senior deputy for state Sen.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four decades, the traffic lights along U.S. 101 in Santa Barbara have been California's ultimate stop signals. When the lights were red, they were the only thing between motorists and 435 miles of free-and-open ride up and down the venerable highway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. But when they were green, they seemed to stay green forever, and they divided Santa Barbara in two. Santa Barbara has learned to live with it.
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