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U S Advanced Battery Consortium

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BUSINESS
September 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Electric Vehicle Battery Pact Set: The U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium has signed a $1.1-million, 12-month research agreement with the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Berkeley for the development of advanced batteries for electric vehicles. Under the agreement, LBL will conduct fundamental research on lithium-polymer electrolyte cells, an electrochemical power source with the potential to make electric vehicles both competitive and commonplace in the future.
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BUSINESS
September 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Electric Vehicle Battery Pact Set: The U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium has signed a $1.1-million, 12-month research agreement with the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Berkeley for the development of advanced batteries for electric vehicles. Under the agreement, LBL will conduct fundamental research on lithium-polymer electrolyte cells, an electrochemical power source with the potential to make electric vehicles both competitive and commonplace in the future.
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BUSINESS
May 19, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little-known battery technology developed by a controversial suburban Detroit firm is expected today to win the first contract awarded by the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium, a government-industry group working on batteries for electric cars. The $18.5-million development contract to be given Energy Conversion Devices Inc. appears to place the nickel-metal hydride battery at the forefront in the race to become the battery technology of choice for electric cars in the mid-1990s.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first battery to be embraced by a government-industry consortium looking for electric car breakthroughs offers the most power per pound of any such technology but could cost upward of $4,000 apiece, its developers said Tuesday. The high upfront cost would be more than offset by its promised lifetime of usage and other advantages, leading to less than half the 15 to 20 cents per mile operating cost of a gasoline-powered car over 100,000 miles, said Energy Conversion Devices Inc.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first battery to be embraced by a government-industry consortium looking for electric car breakthroughs offers the most power per pound of any such technology but could cost upward of $4,000 apiece, its developers said Tuesday. The high upfront cost would be more than offset by its promised lifetime of usage and other advantages, leading to less than half the 15 to 20 cents per mile operating cost of a gasoline-powered car over 100,000 miles, said Energy Conversion Devices Inc.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what could be the biggest challenge yet to the lead U.S. auto makers have held with electric car technology, Toyota Motor Corp. and Nissan Motor Co. reportedly will combine efforts to build electric car components. The two companies--Japan's largest auto makers--are already exchanging technical information about batteries and control systems, the Associated Press said Friday, based on a report in the nationally circulated Mainichi newspaper. U.S.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors and federal scientists said Thursday that they expect to deny foreign auto makers access to the fruits of their joint research, even though several Japanese auto firms are big U.S. producers and employers. Already, a battery research consortium including the Big Three U.S. auto firms and the Energy Department has rejected requests by the Japanese to join, government officials said.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1993 | AMY HARMON
President Clinton this week has called for closer collaboration between government and industry on several fronts. Here is an assessment of the President's proposals: AIRLINES THE PLAN: President Clinton has proposed the creation of a national commission to recommend ways to help the ailing U.S. airline industry. The panel likely would examine ways to help U.S.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors Corp. said Wednesday that it is hoping to mass-produce an advanced battery that could greatly increase the range of electric vehicles--and to do so it is enlisting a former GM chairman as a key adviser. The auto maker said it will provide an undisclosed amount of financial and technical help to Ovonic Battery Co. of Troy, Mich., to develop, manufacture and commercialize a nickel-metal hydride battery. "It's a very promising battery," said Kenneth R.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A battery that could be quickly refueled, like a car's gas tank, has joined the race to develop the first practical electric car. Westwood-based Luz International Ltd., which produces 95% of the world's solar electricity, said Thursday that the concept could help replace the polluting internal-combustion engine. Luz said it plans to demonstrate its battery--which uses a silvery liquid slurry to produce an electric charge--with a test run from Sacramento to Los Angeles early in 1992.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little-known battery technology developed by a controversial suburban Detroit firm is expected today to win the first contract awarded by the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium, a government-industry group working on batteries for electric cars. The $18.5-million development contract to be given Energy Conversion Devices Inc. appears to place the nickel-metal hydride battery at the forefront in the race to become the battery technology of choice for electric cars in the mid-1990s.
NEWS
October 23, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS and MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even as they begin nationwide road tests of electric vehicles, Detroit's auto makers are mounting sharp new attacks on California's mandate that they sell zero-emission cars in the state beginning in 1998. Top industry officials met in Detroit this week to weigh "a broad, consistent and joint strategic plan" for overturning the requirement. At a board meeting of the American Automobile Manufacturers Assn.
NEWS
May 11, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deep in the heart of Texas, where oil is king, a little company is developing an advanced battery for electric vehicles that it hopes will leave gas guzzlers on the roadside like so many dead armadillos. After more than a decade of research and development, Electrosource Inc. is nearing completion of a pilot plant--the first of its kind--that the company hopes will prove its advanced lead-acid batteries can affordably be mass-produced within two years.
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