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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1996
A Tarzana attorney has been convicted of seven counts of lying under oath and concealing assets during bankruptcy proceedings, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Michael D. Freeman, 59, was accused of concealing a bank account and lying about ownership of a small airplane and other assets during the proceedings in 1994. He was found guilty after a 2 1/2-week trial.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
A investigation into the bribing of foreign officials that had netted the guilty pleas of two former top executives at an Orange County valve company has widened into charges to include many of the company's former leaders, the U.S. attorney's office announced Thursday. Six former executives of the company were charged with conspiring to bribe foreign officials and others in return for lucrative contracts that resulted in about $46.5 million in net profit, the U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1987 | ANTHONY PERRY, Times Staff Writer
A former secretary with the U.S. attorney's office in San Diego pleaded guilty Thursday to warning a drug suspect that federal agents planned to search his home and arrest him. Carol Haskell, who worked at the office in downtown San Diego from May, 1984, to January, 1986, pleaded guilty to leaking information to a drug suspect in late 1984, allowing him to clean out his home and flee. She faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2003 | Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writer
The federal government has decided not to file criminal charges against Alaska Airlines over the crash of Flight 261 off the Ventura County coast in January 2000. The U.S. attorney's office in San Francisco said it had concluded last month that there was insufficient evidence to warrant federal prosecution, and the case had been closed. "That decision really bothers me," said Johnson Sanchez of Seattle, whose 27-year-old daughter, Colleen Whorley, died in the crash.
SPORTS
August 6, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. attorney's office is expected to seek an indictment of Sacramento King player Chris Webber on charges he lied to a federal grand jury about his dealings with a University of Michigan basketball booster, sources told The Detroit News. A grand jury could be asked to indict Webber as early as Wednesday on charges of making a false declaration before a grand jury on Aug. 2, 2000, sources familiar with the investigation told the newspaper.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The federal investigation of former Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. junk bond chief Michael Milken has broadened to focus on whether his department in effect bribed the managers of mutual funds and other customers to buy difficult-to-sell securities from Drexel. Sources close to the investigation confirmed that both the Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2009 | Nathan Olivarez-Giles
A investigation into the bribing of foreign officials that had netted the guilty pleas of two former top executives at an Orange County valve company has widened into charges to include many of the company's former leaders, the U.S. attorney's office announced Thursday. Six former executives of the company were charged with conspiring to bribe foreign officials and others in return for lucrative contracts that resulted in about $46.5 million in net profit, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2003 | Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writer
The federal government has decided not to file criminal charges against Alaska Airlines over the crash of Flight 261 off the Ventura County coast in January 2000. The U.S. attorney's office in San Francisco said it had concluded last month that there was insufficient evidence to warrant federal prosecution, and the case had been closed. "That decision really bothers me," said Johnson Sanchez of Seattle, whose 27-year-old daughter, Colleen Whorley, died in the crash.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Former KPMG partner Scott London should be sentenced to three years in prison for selling secret information about the accounting firm's clients to a stock-trading friend, who used the tips to make more than $1.2 million in profitable trades, the federal probation office has recommended. London, who supervised a team of auditors at KPMG's Los Angeles office, was charged with insider trading in April after FBI agents secretly photographed him accepting cash from his friend, Encino jeweler Bryan Shaw, as payment for past tips about the accounting firm's clients.
BUSINESS
August 31, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Tommy “Tiny” Lister, a character actor who has appeared in nearly 100 movies including “Jackie Brown” and “Beverly Hills Cop II,” has agreed to plead guilty to a mortgage fraud scheme that cost banks $3.8 million. The 54-year-old actor entered the plea agreement Friday, the same day prosecutors charged him with conspiring from 2005 to 2007 to buy homes he could not afford and to withdraw more than $1.1 million cash in home-equity loans that were not repaid. Prosecutors accused Lister and five other people - a real estate agent, a mortgage loan officer, a bank manager, an escrow officer and an accountant - of using falsified records to help Lister unlawfully acquire four homes for $5.7 million.
SPORTS
August 6, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. attorney's office is expected to seek an indictment of Sacramento King player Chris Webber on charges he lied to a federal grand jury about his dealings with a University of Michigan basketball booster, sources told The Detroit News. A grand jury could be asked to indict Webber as early as Wednesday on charges of making a false declaration before a grand jury on Aug. 2, 2000, sources familiar with the investigation told the newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1996
A Tarzana attorney has been convicted of seven counts of lying under oath and concealing assets during bankruptcy proceedings, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Michael D. Freeman, 59, was accused of concealing a bank account and lying about ownership of a small airplane and other assets during the proceedings in 1994. He was found guilty after a 2 1/2-week trial.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The federal investigation of former Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. junk bond chief Michael Milken has broadened to focus on whether his department in effect bribed the managers of mutual funds and other customers to buy difficult-to-sell securities from Drexel. Sources close to the investigation confirmed that both the Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1987 | ANTHONY PERRY, Times Staff Writer
A former secretary with the U.S. attorney's office in San Diego pleaded guilty Thursday to warning a drug suspect that federal agents planned to search his home and arrest him. Carol Haskell, who worked at the office in downtown San Diego from May, 1984, to January, 1986, pleaded guilty to leaking information to a drug suspect in late 1984, allowing him to clean out his home and flee. She faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. U.S. Atty.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
Two stars of the reality television show “Real Housewives of New Jersey” face the reality of prison after pleading guilty on Tuesday to federal charges of committing a long-running financial fraud. Teresa and Giuseppe “Joe” Giudice entered their guilty pleas before U.S. District Judge Esther Salas in Newark, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Joe Giudice faces 37 to 46 months in prison while Teresa faces 21 to 27 months, though the defense is asking for probation for the actress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Anh Do
An Irvine woman who stole $285,000 from a group of nuns and then spent it all in just 64 days was sentenced Friday to 37 months in federal prison. Linda Rose Gagnon, 59, had promised to help the Roman Catholic sisters buy a retirement home, but instead used the money in a spending spree, paying for pet-sitting services for her dog, gourmet meals and lease payments for an Audi TT sports cars, according to the U.S. attorney's office. The Irvine resident was found guilty in November of three counts of wire fraud for defrauding the U.S. Province of the Religious of Jesus & Mary, an order devoted to educational and charitable work.
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