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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Brent Kroeger pores over nasty online comments about stay-at-home dads, wondering if his friends think those things about him. The Rowland Heights father remembers high school classmates laughing when he said he wanted to be a "house husband. " He avoids mentioning it on Facebook. "I don't want other men to look at me like less of a man," Kroeger said. His fears are tied to a bigger phenomenon: The gender revolution has been lopsided. Even as American society has seen sweeping transformations - expanding roles for women, surging tolerance for homosexuality - popular ideas about masculinity seem to have stagnated.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
The population of Los Angeles County has edged past 10 million -- a new high for the most populous county in the United States, according to just-released estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. As of July, the county was estimated to have a whopping 10,017,068 residents. That's nearly twice as many as the next largest: Cook County in Illinois, which had an estimated 5,240,700 people. Though Los Angeles has the biggest population by far, it isn't among the fastest growing counties in the U.S., many of which are in oil- and gas-producing areas in and around the Great Plains.
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NEWS
August 29, 1985
The U.S. Census Bureau has begun recruiting workers to help conduct an interim survey next year of several communities in southeast Los Angeles County and the San Gabriel Valley. The survey is being taken to help the bureau refine information-gathering techniques for the 1990 Census, said Armando Randon, a bureau spokesman in Washington. Similar surveys were conducted this year in Florida and New Jersey and another is to be conducted in Mississippi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014
Data for this analysis were compiled from the 2008-2012 estimates of the American Community Survey, which asks respondents to report the number of rooms in their dwellings, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. That measure includes bedrooms, kitchens and living rooms and excludes bathrooms, hallways, outdoor areas and unfinished spaces. A unit was considered crowded if it housed more than one occupant per room. The percentage of homes that were crowded was determined for all ZIP Code Tabulation Areas and census tracts in the U.S. Every area in the country was ranked by statistically weighing its number of households and how much its crowding rate deviated from the national average, about 3%. This lowered the ranking of sparsely populated areas with high crowding rates, but made for appropriate comparisons between any two places.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2000 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kicking off what promises to be the largest survey ever of the local population, the U.S. Census Bureau officially opened its Ventura County office Friday with a pledge to perform the most accurate count to date during the once-a-decade event. Dozens of elected officials, school district representatives and community leaders gathered at the Market Street office in Ventura, where as many as 700 census takers will be stationed this spring when the head count swings into high gear.
NEWS
April 14, 1990 | Associated Press
citizen the U.S. Census Bureau almost missed this year was Mayor Jim Scheibel. His apartment was among the 5,000 households in the St. Paul area that did not receive census forms in the mail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | Judy Silber, (714) 966-5988
The Chamber of Commerce will hold a luncheon Thursday featuring a speech by Arnold Landau, district supervisor for the U.S. Census Bureau, at Adventure City, 10120 Beach Blvd. The luncheon begins at noon and costs $10 in advance, $12 at the door. Reservations are recommended. Information: (714) 995-1485.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2000 | Alex Murashko, (714) 966-5974
The U.S. Census Bureau is recruiting Leisure World residents to apply for paid temporary work as census takers. Residents will be asked to work through Census Day on April 1 and be available 20 hours per week. Information: (888) 325-7733.
NEWS
March 15, 1990
The U.S. Census Bureau is looking for up to 7,000 temporary employees to work as enumerators in Los Angeles County from April to July, said John Reeder, director of the Census Bureau's regional office in Los Angeles. Applicants should own a car, must be able to read and write English and must be U.S. citizens or legal residents, officials said. Call (213) 720-3956 or 253-1204.
OPINION
August 7, 2005
1. How much does a nose job cost? L.A. $3,332 Shanghai $250 2. How much bottled water is guzzled yearly per person? L.A. 40 liters Shanghai eight liters 3. How much does it cost to fill a 15-gallon gasoline tank? L.A. $37.50 at $2.50/gallon Shanghai $27.75 at $1.85/gallon 4. How much does it cost to take the crosstown bus? L.A. $1.25 Shanghai 25 cents (no A/C: 12 cents ) 5. What does it cost to fill up on dumplings? L.A. $4 for eight Shanghai 25 cents for eight 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Brent Kroeger pores over nasty online comments about stay-at-home dads, wondering if his friends think those things about him. The Rowland Heights father remembers high school classmates laughing when he said he wanted to be a "house husband. " He avoids mentioning it on Facebook. "I don't want other men to look at me like less of a man," Kroeger said. His fears are tied to a bigger phenomenon: The gender revolution has been lopsided. Even as American society has seen sweeping transformations - expanding roles for women, surging tolerance for homosexuality - popular ideas about masculinity seem to have stagnated.
SCIENCE
December 16, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A new study that zeroed in on a single city in Michigan found that where men are scarce, youth were more likely to commit assaults. Researchers from the University of Michigan analyzed youth arrests and U.S. Census Bureau data for Flint, Mich., an industrial city whose fortunes have risen and fallen with General Motors Corp. They found that "adult male scarcity" - a low ratio of adult men to women - was closely tied to the share of households that had meager incomes or were getting government assistance, as well as the share of single parents.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Young women seem tantalizingly close to achieving gender equality in the workplace, at least when it comes to wages, a new report from the Pew Research Center suggests. But it remains to be seen whether motherhood will slow their strides, as it did for women before them. As of last year, female workers ages 25 to 34 were making 93% of what men of the same ages earned - much closer to wage equality than earlier generations, Pew found. Between 1980 and 2012, the gap has gradually narrowed for American workers, as wages rose for women and dropped for young men. Just 15% of young women said they had suffered discrimination because of their gender at work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Sixteen-year-old Mary Sem worries about her family. She has overheard her mother crying over memories of loved ones she lost to the Khmer Rouge. Her father and older sisters struggle to cover rent and the perpetual bills. Her college dreams are hitched to helping them. If Mary got a degree and a good job, "my family would be able to pay the bills on time," the teen said one day after school in Long Beach. "They wouldn't need to worry about anything. " The Sems, who trace their roots to Cambodia, have little in common with the stereotype of Asian Americans as a "model minority" that is faring well economically.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
The exodus of immigrants who were in the United States illegally and left the country during the recession has halted--and the tide may actually be turning, a new report says. An analysis by the Pew Research Center finds that the number of immigrants living illegally in the U.S.--mostly people who arrived without valid documents or overstayed their visas- - has held steady and may even have grown slightly beginning in 2009. Earlier Pew research found that the numbers plunged by nearly a million during the downturn.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
When Berto Solis and Nancy Thuvanuti met, nobody thought they would last, he remembers. She was a New Jersey girl with Thai and Irish roots, a fashionista streak and a family full of university graduates. He was "rough around the edges," he remembers, a Mexican American first in his family to go to college, a San Joaquin Valley transplant still trying to find himself. "Everyone was like, 'Her? Him?'" Solis said, now six years later. "But whenever we just let ourselves be, we said, 'I don't know what they're talking about.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989
City officials and community leaders met with a U.S. Census Bureau representative Tuesday to get ideas for reaching out to minority communities to ensure a more accurate count in the 1990 census, especially among Latino and Asian residents. Peter Bounpane, assistant director of the U.S. Census Bureau, made the one-day visit at the request of Santa Ana City Councilman Miguel A. Pulido, who said the city's population has changed since 1980.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
An Arab American organization based in Washington accused the U.S. government of discrimination by barring many Arab immigrants from U.S. Census Bureau jobs counting the nation's population. The Census Bureau denied the contention, saying it hires qualified workers regardless of national origin or religion.
SCIENCE
August 20, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
California leads U.S. states in science and engineering employment, according to a new report from researchers at the National Science Foundation In 2011, the state employed 786,653 people in science and engineering jobs - nearly 14% of the 5.7 million workers in such occupations across the United States. New York and Texas were also science jobs standouts - but with 328,851 and 450,316 jobs, respectively, they trail the Golden State. The two local regions with the highest science and engineering employment were also in California: the Santa Clara or Silicon Valley area, with 143,329 jobs; and the Los Angeles region, with 141,719 jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In California and across the country, more people are speaking Spanish, Korean or a slew of other languages besides English at home - a phenomenon that has historically set off heated debate about how immigrants will assimilate into American life. Yet in recent years, as other tongues became more common in American homes, people nationwide were no less likely to speak English with ease, a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau shows. Scholars say slowing immigration has given rise to a more settled population of people born abroad.
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