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NATIONAL
December 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Although the jobless rate is at its lowest level in five years and the stock market has surpassed its pre-recession high, the economic gains have not reached many poor urban residents, and 2014 could be even worse, a new survey said Wednesday. Homelessness and hunger have increased and are expected to keep rising in many cities next year, according to the latest U.S. Conference of Mayors survey of 25 large and midsized metro areas. Last year's national poverty rate of 15% is still near the Great Recession's high of 15.1%, according to U.S. Census figures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Los Angeles is among the top 10 U.S. cities with the widest gulf between the rich and poor, a Washington think tank reported Thursday. The upper 5% of Los Angeles residents earned more than 12 times what the bottom 20% took in,  Alan Barube, who studies social policies affecting low-income families for the Brookings Institution, said in a paper . The income spread was similar in New York City, Washington, Oakland, Chicago and Baltimore, he...
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NEWS
June 30, 1987 | Associated Press
One in three U.S. cities surveyed expects to see a decline in general revenues this year, and one-fourth of cities are reducing municipal jobs, the National League of Cities said Monday. The organization, releasing its annual survey of city financial conditions, cited regional economic difficulties and the effects of the loss of federal revenue sharing and elements of the new federal tax law as causing difficulty for local governments.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2014 | Andrew Khouri
Home prices in large U.S. cities posted strong annual gains in October but slowed from a month earlier, according to a leading gauge, reflecting a seasonal cooling and the struggles of home buyers in a pricier market. The S&P/Case-Shiller index of 20 large U.S. metropolitan areas, released Tuesday, rose 13.6% from October 2012, the largest pop since the beginning of 2006, during the housing bubble. But over the month there was a cooling trend. Prices increased just 0.2% from September, less than economists had expected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2005 | Steve Harvey
Anaheim shouldn't feel it has lost any luster, even with its Angels trying to add "Los Angeles" to the team's name. After all, Anaheim has a prominent place in the new book "The Largest U.S. Cities Named After a Food, and Other Mind-Boggling Geography Lists from Around the World." Listen to this: Anaheim is the sixth most populous city in the nation to have a name that is unduplicated anywhere else in the world, author Brandt Maxwell says.
TRAVEL
April 17, 2005 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
Hotels eat up a major chunk of your travel budget. Let's take a look at some of the ways you can lower the cost. Urban hotels usually charge the most. Average room rates in New York City are more than $220 a night. You'll pay comparable amounts in San Francisco, Chicago and Washington, D.C. In London and Paris, you'll pay far more. To avoid the high prices, some smart travelers rent spare rooms in occupied private apartments or homes.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1990 | TIMOTHY H. WILLARD, TIMOTHY H. WILLARD is managing partner of the Futurist, a publication of the World Future Society in Bethesda, Md
While some U.S. cities will have to scramble to attract workers to fill jobs in the near future, five will continue to be particularly desirable employment targets for those changing jobs or relocating. Atlanta, St. Louis, Chicago, Dallas and Columbus, Ohio, have a special attractiveness for workers that will make these cities some of the most desired working environments of the 1990s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2013 | By Emily Alpert, Los Angeles Times
Irvine grew faster than all but seven other large U.S. cities between July 2011 and July 2012, with its population vaulting to nearly 230,000 last year, new census data show. The pace of growth was nearly five times as fast as the Southern California average. The increase continues a pattern for Irvine, where population climbed an average of 4.8% annually between 2000 and 2010. It rose 3.4% the next year and 4.2% last year, according to census data released Thursday. City officials see the numbers as proof that its meticulous planning has worked.
HEALTH
October 8, 2001 | SUSAN OKIE, WASHINGTON POST
A newly identified, antibiotic-resistant strain of a common bacterium is contributing to an increase in relatively hard-to-treat bladder infections in women in at least three U.S. cities, according to a study published Thursday. Genetic analysis and other laboratory tests pinpointed the strain of Escherichia coli bacteria as the culprit in a substantial percentage of drug-resistant urinary tract infections among female university students in Berkeley, Minneapolis and Ann Arbor, Mich.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Alejandro Lazo and Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
U.S. home prices are rising sharply, new data indicate, helping to cement a growing consensus that the real estate slump is over. But with jobs and the economy growing at a decidedly sluggish pace, experts caution that the housing market is not likely to sustain a sharp upward trajectory and give a major boost to the overall economy. The closely watched Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index for the nation's 20 largest cities posted its first year-over-year increase, at 0.5%, since 2010, June data released Tuesday showed.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Although the jobless rate is at its lowest level in five years and the stock market has surpassed its pre-recession high, the economic gains have not reached many poor urban residents, and 2014 could be even worse, a new survey said Wednesday. Homelessness and hunger have increased and are expected to keep rising in many cities next year, according to the latest U.S. Conference of Mayors survey of 25 large and midsized metro areas. Last year's national poverty rate of 15% is still near the Great Recession's high of 15.1%, according to U.S. Census figures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
The roads in greater Los Angeles are the most deteriorated in the United States, which costs Southern California drivers more than $800 a year, according to a national transportation analysis released Thursday. Los Angeles-Santa Ana-Long Beach ranks first among cities with more than 500,000 residents for the percentage of roads in poor condition, according to TRIP, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit group that studies transportation data and issues. According to the study, about 64% of roads in greater Los Angeles are in poor condition.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2013 | By Andrew Khouri
The pace of home price gains appears to be slowing nationally, even as metropolitan markets posted strong year-over-year increases in July, according to a leading index. Home prices rose 1.8% over June and 12.4% compared with a year earlier, according to the Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index of the 20 largest U.S. cities, released Tuesday. But 15 of those cities saw monthly gains moderate from June. "The rate of increase may have peaked," David M. Blitzer, chairman of the index committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2013 | By Andrew Khouri
Home prices shot up in America's largest cities in May, according to a closely watched home price index. The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index of 20 large U.S. cities, released Tuesday, rose 2.4% from April and 12.2% from May 2012.  San Francisco saw the largest year-over-year increase as prices jumped 24.5%. Las Vegas and Phoenix saw the next largest gains with prices rising 23.3% and 20.6%, respectiviely. In Los Angeles, prices rose 19.2%. Southern California's most affordable ZIP Codes “Home prices continue to strengthen,”  David M. Blitzer, chairman of the index committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2013 | By Andrew Khouri
Home prices shot up in America's largest cities in May, rising at a pace not seen since the bubble days, according to a closely watched gauge. The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index of 20 large U.S. cities, released Tuesday, rose 2.4% from April and 12.2% from May 2012 - the largest year-over-year gain since March 2006. Average home prices across the 20 cities have now reached their spring 2004 level. For the first time, two cities - Denver and Dallas - surpassed the peaks they reached before the 2008 financial crisis.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo and Andrew Khouri, Los Angeles Times
Home prices in large U.S. cities rose sharply in April, posting the biggest one-month gain in the history of a leading U.S. home price index. The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index of 20 large U.S. cities rose 2.5% over March and 12.1% from April 2012. Every city tracked by the measure has now posted at least four consecutive months of year-over-year increases, indicating a broad and robust real estate recovery. Prices have risen so quickly in certain markets - including Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco - that some economists are warning of another housing bubble.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Los Angeles is among the top 10 U.S. cities with the widest gulf between the rich and poor, a Washington think tank reported Thursday. The upper 5% of Los Angeles residents earned more than 12 times what the bottom 20% took in,  Alan Barube, who studies social policies affecting low-income families for the Brookings Institution, said in a paper . The income spread was similar in New York City, Washington, Oakland, Chicago and Baltimore, he...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Emily Alpert, Los Angeles Times
People with Chinese or Vietnamese roots are as segregated as Latinos in neighborhoods nationwide, a study from Brown University has found. In Los Angeles and Orange counties, the pattern is even more extreme - and has grown more so over the last two decades. But the same study suggests that that may not necessarily be a problem. In many cities, some Asian Americans live in neighborhoods that appear "separate but equal," with incomes and education levels as high or higher than largely white neighborhoods, researchers said.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo
Home prices in the largest U.S. cities are recovering at boom-era levels, with a closely watched index posting its strongest increase in close to seven years. Tight housing supply and strong demand continued to fuel a robust market recovery in March, with the Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index of 20 U.S. cities recording a 10.9% year-over-year increase. That was the strongest increase since April 2006. The index was up 1.4% from the prior month. A separate national index showed home prices rising 10.2% year-over-year at the end of the first quarter.
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