Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsU S Congress
IN THE NEWS

U S Congress

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Chinese government accused the U.S. Congress on Thursday of slander and gross interference in the latest round of recriminations prompted by Beijing's crackdown on pro-democracy protests. In Paris, prominent Chinese exiles including student leader Wuer Kaixi appealed for more pressure from Western governments and individuals on China's leaders to halt secret arrests and executions of dissidents. China's Foreign Ministry accused U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
October 16, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
World financial leaders have been warning for weeks that the U.S. congressional gridlock over funding the government and raising the debt ceiling are imperiling economies worldwide and undermining confidence in the U.S. dollar. Even the news Wednesday that the partisan battle was about to be suspended until early next year has done little to spare U.S. leaders damage to their reputation as responsible stewards of the No. 1 global economy, analysts warned. China and Japan are the largest foreign holders of U.S. Treasury bills, with $1.3 trillion and $1.1 trillion, respectively, of Washington's outstanding debt,  according to International Monetary Fund data . That makes them the most exposed in the event -- once considered unimaginable but nowadays less so -- that the U.S. Congress fails to raise the debt ceiling by Thursday, when U.S. obligations are expected to exceed the current $16.7-trillion limit.
Advertisement
WORLD
September 28, 2013 | By Don Lee and Ramin Mostaghim
WASHINGTON - A day after his potentially momentous phone conversation with President Obama, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani was met at home Saturday by cheering supporters and some egg-pelting protesters, while a few members of the U.S. Congress offered a cautious, if somewhat muted, assessment of the first such contact between leaders of the two nations since 1979. The reaction reflected the political realities in both countries over signs of a thawing of relations between the United States and Iran after decades of antagonism, most recently over Tehran's nuclear program.
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Don Lee and Ramin Mostaghim
WASHINGTON - A day after his potentially momentous phone conversation with President Obama , Iranian President Hassan Rouhani was met at home Saturday by cheering supporters and some egg-pelting protesters, while a few members of the U.S. Congress offered a cautious, if somewhat muted, assessment of the first such contact between leaders of the two nations since 1979. The reaction reflected the political realities in both countries over signs of a thawing of relations between the United States and Iran after decades of antagonism, most recently over Tehran's nuclear program . "I think you're going to see very strong reactions in the U.S. and Iran," said Jon Wolfsthal, deputy director of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies.
NEWS
October 16, 1987 | From Reuters
China said today it will not allow a human rights delegation from the U.S. Congress to visit Tibet, where pro-independence demonstrations and rioting broke out in recent weeks. "Matters concerning Tibet are the internal affairs of China in which the U.S. Congress has no right to meddle," the Foreign Ministry said in a statement. Rep.
WORLD
June 27, 2013 | By Chris Kraul and Pablo Jaramillo Viteri
QUITO, Ecuador -- Ecuador on Thursday announced it was withdrawing from a 2-decade-old trade pact with the United States, saying the agreement left the South American nation vulnerable to “blackmail” as U.S. officials seek the return of fugitive Edward Snowden. The trade agreement was already at risk of not being renewed by the U.S. Congress before Ecuador began weighing whether to grant asylum to Snowden, the former contract worker for the National Security Agency who recently revealed extensive U.S. tracking of telephone communications and then fled from Hawaii to Hong Kong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1987 | Associated Press
Despite slight shrinkages in each of their ranks, Roman Catholics, United Methodists and Episcopalians maintain their predominance in the makeup of the new U.S. Congress. Catholics continued to be the largest single denominational group with 141, but combined Protestants of various kinds were more than twice as numerous, totaling 346.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan launched a charm offensive here on behalf of his organization Thursday, and though he won plaudits wherever he appeared, he also encountered an ingrained skepticism in Congress toward the world body. That was evident in Annan's long meeting with Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), a virulent critic of the United Nations who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Helms praised Annan, who took office Jan.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
President Obama has launched a media blitz culminating in a speech to the nation urging military action against Syria. He will speak to diverse constituencies that have little in common: a war-weary U.S. public, a fractious Congress, nations worried about the impact of a strike. Here is a primer on how to listen to the president's speech Tuesday. What started the current crisis? Syria has been locked in a civil war for more than two years, during which more than 100,000 people have died and more than 2 million people have fled to other countries as refugees.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2006 | Faye Fiore and Nick Timiraos, Times Staff Writers
When Rep. Charlie Norwood was diagnosed with a chronic lung disease a few years back, he followed the orders of his wife, Gloria, and gave up red meat, chewing tobacco and his favorite cigars. But that didn't save the Georgia Republican -- recently recovered from a lung transplant and hooked up to an oxygen tank -- from landing in a shroud of cigarette smoke recently as he parked his scooter chair in the Speaker's Lobby outside the House floor.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
President Obama has launched a media blitz culminating in a speech to the nation urging military action against Syria. He will speak to diverse constituencies that have little in common: a war-weary U.S. public, a fractious Congress, nations worried about the impact of a strike. Here is a primer on how to listen to the president's speech Tuesday. What started the current crisis? Syria has been locked in a civil war for more than two years, during which more than 100,000 people have died and more than 2 million people have fled to other countries as refugees.
WORLD
June 27, 2013 | By Chris Kraul and Pablo Jaramillo Viteri
QUITO, Ecuador -- Ecuador on Thursday announced it was withdrawing from a 2-decade-old trade pact with the United States, saying the agreement left the South American nation vulnerable to “blackmail” as U.S. officials seek the return of fugitive Edward Snowden. The trade agreement was already at risk of not being renewed by the U.S. Congress before Ecuador began weighing whether to grant asylum to Snowden, the former contract worker for the National Security Agency who recently revealed extensive U.S. tracking of telephone communications and then fled from Hawaii to Hong Kong.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Texas' first congressional candidate debate in Spanish could help decide one of the closest races in the country . Incumbent Republican Rep. Francisco “Quico” Canseco, 63, a tea party conservative, will face challenger Pete Gallego, 50, a Democratic state representative, Tuesday night in an hourlong debate aired by Spanish-language network Univision. The event at Palo Alto College in San Antonio will be moderated by KWEX Univision 41 anchor Arantxa Loizaga, with questions from a panel of reporters at the station, the San Antonio Express-News and Texas Public Radio.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2012 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- Who better to pay tribute to ham, or rather a form of it, than a member of Congress? Rep. Tim Walz (D-Minn.) was on the House floor Wednesday, declaring "Happy 75th birthday, Spam!" He proudly held up the familiar blue-and-yellow tin of the long-ridiculed, but iconic, blend of spiced pork shoulder and ham, manufactured by Hormel Foods Corp. in his district. "Spam is an important part of our American history," Walz said. "It  played an essential role in feeding Allied troops during World War II, has worked to create local jobs and, with over 7 billion cans sold worldwide, has truly become an iconic American product.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010 | By Sharon Mizota, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Like many others, artist Mel Chin went to post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans to see what he could do to help. And like many, he was overwhelmed by the devastation he saw. But the artist, known for conceptual works that blend art, politics and science, ended up catalyzing a nationwide effort to address a problem that has plagued the city since well before the hurricane. New Orleans, like many urban centers, has levels of lead in its soil that are as much as four times the limit deemed safe by the Environmental Protection Agency.
OPINION
April 9, 2009
Before the American Revolution, a plaintiff could successfully sue a writer for libel even when the offensive statement was demonstrably true. Then, starting with the famous Zenger case in 1735 and culminating with the New York Times vs. Sullivan ruling by the Supreme Court in 1964, American law cemented our tradition of open expression of ideas.
WORLD
October 16, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
World financial leaders have been warning for weeks that the U.S. congressional gridlock over funding the government and raising the debt ceiling are imperiling economies worldwide and undermining confidence in the U.S. dollar. Even the news Wednesday that the partisan battle was about to be suspended until early next year has done little to spare U.S. leaders damage to their reputation as responsible stewards of the No. 1 global economy, analysts warned. China and Japan are the largest foreign holders of U.S. Treasury bills, with $1.3 trillion and $1.1 trillion, respectively, of Washington's outstanding debt,  according to International Monetary Fund data . That makes them the most exposed in the event -- once considered unimaginable but nowadays less so -- that the U.S. Congress fails to raise the debt ceiling by Thursday, when U.S. obligations are expected to exceed the current $16.7-trillion limit.
OPINION
March 24, 2009
Thanks to the latest protectionist move by Congress to dodge our free-trade obligations with Mexico, in six to eight weeks, more than 20,000 pounds of California strawberries that ordinarily would be headed south of the border will have nowhere to go. The 80,000 people employed by the industry, however, know exactly where their jobs will be headed -- into thin air.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|