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ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Meg James
Representatives for Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. say there is no truth to rumors that the media giant is poised to pay huge fines in order to settle allegations that it bribed foreign officials. News Corp. has been plagued by talk that it violated federal laws that prohibit U.S.-based companies from bribing foreign government officials since the company's phone hacking scandal exploded in Great Britain two summers ago. News Corp. has spent several hundreds of millions of dollars in the last two years on legal fees and settlements with dozens of phone hacking victims. In recent months, there have been reports the company has been in discussions with the U.S. Department of Justice to potentially pay a fine should federal prosecutors determine that News Corp.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
Federal officials kicked up their campaign against discriminatory school discipline policies last week, issuing first-ever guidelines for school districts on how to avoid racial disparities in student punishment. In a 23-page letter, officials with the U.S. departments of justice and education said they recognized that schools must use discipline to promote a "safe and orderly" environment but that federal data and investigations showed that African Americans were punished more harshly and frequently than whites in similar situations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
Federal officials kicked up their campaign against discriminatory school discipline policies last week, issuing first-ever guidelines for school districts on how to avoid racial disparities in student punishment. In a 23-page letter, officials with the U.S. departments of justice and education said they recognized that schools must use discipline to promote a "safe and orderly" environment but that federal data and investigations showed that African Americans were punished more harshly and frequently than whites in similar situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2013 | By Meg James
Representatives for Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. say there is no truth to rumors that the media giant is poised to pay huge fines in order to settle allegations that it bribed foreign officials. News Corp. has been plagued by talk that it violated federal laws that prohibit U.S.-based companies from bribing foreign government officials since the company's phone hacking scandal exploded in Great Britain two summers ago. News Corp. has spent several hundreds of millions of dollars in the last two years on legal fees and settlements with dozens of phone hacking victims. In recent months, there have been reports the company has been in discussions with the U.S. Department of Justice to potentially pay a fine should federal prosecutors determine that News Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2009 | Joel Rubin
A judge Monday postponed deciding whether to free the Los Angeles Police Department from years of federal oversight. More than eight years ago, following the Rampart corruption scandal, the LAPD was forced by the U.S. Department of Justice to agree to a sweeping set of reforms aimed at improving officers' behavior and the department's ability to maintain order in its own house. In 2007, U.S. District Judge Gary A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2011 | By Lee Romney and John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Department of Justice has asked a judge to extend federal oversight of two state mental hospitals, saying the facilities have failed to comply with critical provisions of a sweeping consent judgment imposed 5 1/2 years ago. In a filing late Friday night, federal officials detailed key failings at Napa State Hospital and Norwalk's Metropolitan State Hospital: preventable suicides, nursing errors leading to unnecessary suffering, improper use...
SPORTS
January 20, 1999 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sprinter who became one of Finland's most revered sports heroes on Tuesday resigned her post on the International Olympic Committee, the first IOC member toppled by the bribery scandal roiling the Olympic movement. Pirjo Haggman, 47, one of the first women to become an IOC member and a track champion so beloved in Finland that she has been depicted on a postage stamp, delivered her resignation to IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch in Lausanne, Switzerland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2008 | Joanna Lin and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
An Inglewood police officer who shot and killed an armed man early Monday while responding to a domestic disturbance call is one of two patrolmen under investigation for another fatal shooting in May, authorities said. Officer Brian Ragan, a 5 1/2 -year veteran of the department, was immediately placed on paid administrative leave after the shooting of Kevin Wicks, 38, said Capt. Eve Irvine, commanding officer of the department's detective bureau.
OPINION
April 18, 2010 | By Joe Domanick
Former Police Chief Daryl F. Gates cast a long shadow, not just on the LAPD but on Los Angeles and American policing. Some of what he will be remembered for is positive: He displayed immense loyalty to the officers who served him, and for that was revered by many of them. But the largest part of his legacy remains a cautionary tale that future generations ignore at their peril. Gates' tumultuous tenure as chief began in 1978 and ended with his forced resignation following the 1992 Los Angeles riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2011 | By Lee Romney and John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Department of Justice has asked a judge to extend federal oversight of two state mental hospitals, saying the facilities have failed to comply with critical provisions of a sweeping consent judgment imposed 5 1/2 years ago. In a filing late Friday night, federal officials detailed key failings at Napa State Hospital and Norwalk's Metropolitan State Hospital: preventable suicides, nursing errors leading to unnecessary suffering, improper use...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2009 | Joel Rubin
A judge Monday postponed deciding whether to free the Los Angeles Police Department from years of federal oversight. More than eight years ago, following the Rampart corruption scandal, the LAPD was forced by the U.S. Department of Justice to agree to a sweeping set of reforms aimed at improving officers' behavior and the department's ability to maintain order in its own house. In 2007, U.S. District Judge Gary A.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Residential telephone customers can sue the government for allegedly eavesdropping on their private communications in a warrantless "dragnet of ordinary Americans," a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. Lawyers for customers of AT&T and other telecommunications providers hailed the ruling for allowing the courts to decide whether widespread warrantless wiretapping violated their constitutional rights. "It's huge. It means six years after we started trying, the American people may get a judicial ruling on whether the massive spying done on them since 9/11 is legal or not," said Cindy Cohn, legal director for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which was among those fighting for a day in court.
NEWS
August 24, 1996 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual ruling that raises vegetarianism to the same level as religious beliefs, a federal commission said Friday that an Orange County bus driver was wrongly fired for refusing to hand out coupons for free hamburgers as part of a promotion to boost ridership. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said the Orange County Transportation Authority "failed to reasonably accommodate" driver Bruce Anderson in violation of laws against religious discrimination.
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