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U S Ecology Company

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NEWS
May 4, 2000 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
U.S. Ecology, the firm that hoped to operate the Ward Valley nuclear waste dump, is seeking $162 million in damages in a lawsuit stemming from the Davis administration's abandonment of the project. The suit, filed Wednesday in San Diego Superior Court, would also require the governor to resume efforts to acquire the site of the proposed dump near Needles in the eastern Mojave Desert. Championed by former Gov.
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NEWS
May 4, 2000 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
U.S. Ecology, the firm that hoped to operate the Ward Valley nuclear waste dump, is seeking $162 million in damages in a lawsuit stemming from the Davis administration's abandonment of the project. The suit, filed Wednesday in San Diego Superior Court, would also require the governor to resume efforts to acquire the site of the proposed dump near Needles in the eastern Mojave Desert. Championed by former Gov.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 1986
American Ecology reported a 59% drop in net income on a sales decline of 22% for the calendar first quarter. The Agoura Hills waste management firm said it earned $700,000, or 24 cents per share, on sales of $10.4 million. American Ecology attributed its downturn to delays in the implementation of laws governing low-level radioactive wastes, which are handled by American Ecology's subsidiary, U.S. Ecology.
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Radioactive material that would be deposited in the proposed Ward Valley low-level nuclear waste dump near the Colorado River would come largely from nuclear reactors and could be far more toxic than previously portrayed, according to a study by the Congressional Research Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1993 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court has let stand a lower court ruling that says the Wilson Administration is not required to hold a special hearing on the safety of a proposed low-level nuclear waste dump in the Mojave Desert. In 1992, the Wilson Administration had promised environmental opponents of the dump to hold an adjudicatory hearing in which witnesses would have to testify about the dump under oath.
NEWS
May 8, 1993 | MARIA L. La GANGA and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITERS
A proposed nuclear waste dump in the desolate Mojave Desert moved closer to construction Friday when the state Court of Appeal in Sacramento ruled that the Wilson Administration does not have to hold a hearing to address safety and liability issues related to the dump. In addition, Gov. Pete Wilson on Friday ordered the Department of Health Services to decide within 30 days whether to grant a license for the dump to U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1997
The most compelling argument for building a low-level nuclear waste disposal facility in the California desert at Ward Valley has always been that such waste is accumulating faster than it can be safely disposed of. Now comes a Nebraska economics professor with persuasive evidence that this dump is not needed at all. He also argues that disposal at Ward Valley would be more expensive for hospitals and other waste generators than if they continued to use existing dumps.
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Alarmed that efforts to build a low-level nuclear waste dump in the Mojave Desert are faltering, Arizona Gov. Fife Symington has prodded Gov. Pete Wilson to act promptly to open the facility required by federal law or face possible legal action by Arizona. In an unusually blunt Jan.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | MARIA L. La GANGA and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITERS
A controversial low-level nuclear waste dump in the Southern California desert cleared a major hurdle Thursday night when Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan announced he will proceed with the sale of 1,000 acres of federal land to the state of California before the White House changes hands. Lujan said in a written statement that he is proceeding with a sale of the Ward Valley site at the request of Gov. Pete Wilson.
NEWS
January 20, 1993 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A federal judge refused Tuesday to allow the outgoing Bush Administration to sell land to the state for a low-level nuclear dump in the Southern California desert. U. S. District Judge Marilyn Patel, ruling in San Francisco, extended a temporary restraining order against the land sale for up to 10 days, delaying any possible federal action on the transfer until President-elect Bill Clinton's Administration takes over. Bush's Interior secretary, Manuel Lujan Jr., announced Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1993
On Nov. 25, you ran a letter from Harry J. Phillips Jr., the chairman of American Ecology, complaining that a Business Week story on the safety record of an American Ecology subsidiary was "rife with errors." On the contrary, the story was accurate and thoroughly documented by our reporter, Eric Schine, through extensive interviewing and research into the record of the subsidiary, U.S. Ecology. The story said the record of U.S. Ecology, the company designated to run the Ward Valley dump for radioactive waste, has prompted concerns among the dump's opponents because of a long trail of radioactive dumps and lawsuits.
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