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WORLD
February 12, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO -- An Egyptian employee of the U.S. Embassy has been detained by police since Jan. 25, an embassy spokesman said Wednesday. The jailed staffer was identified as Ahmed Eleiba. Associates said his work involved monitoring developments concerning political Islam in Egypt -- a sensitive subject in the wake of the popularly supported military coup that deposed Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in July. The incident reflected an increasingly aggressive stance by the Egyptian police and judiciary toward anyone suspected of even a tangential connection with the Muslim Brotherhood or any other Islamist group.
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WORLD
April 27, 2014 | Christi Parsons, David Cloud
The U.S. and Philippine governments have worked out a new defense cooperation agreement that opens the way for the first large-scale return of American military forces to the island nation since their eviction in the early 1990s, according to the White House. A day before President Obama is scheduled to arrive in Manila, advisors to the president said Sunday that the two sides had completed and will sign a framework accord that will allow U.S. troops, warships and aircraft to operate from Philippine military bases and training camps on a rotating basis.
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WORLD
December 25, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The U.S. Embassy in Kabul came under attack on Christmas morning, and the Taliban later claimed responsibility, saying it had fired four rockets at the American compound. U.S. officials said that two rounds of either mortar or rocket fire struck the embassy and that no Americans were hurt, the Associated Press reported. Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid said in an email to journalists that the assault "inflicted heavy casualties," but the group frequently exaggerates the scope of its attacks.
WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim
WASHINGTON - The White House will block Iran's choice of United Nations ambassador from entering the United States, officials said Friday, stoking new tension between Tehran and Washington as they approach a critical moment in negotiations over Iran's disputed nuclear program. Facing overwhelming bipartisan pressure from Congress, White House officials said Hamid Aboutalebi would not be granted a U.S. visa. The choice of the veteran diplomat set off an outcry in Washington because of his membership in the radical student group that stormed the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and held U.S. diplomats hostage during Iran's 1979 revolution.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | United Press International
The U.S. Embassy resumed operations under special police watch Wednesday, after a terrorist threat Tuesday that prompted evacuation of the building.
WORLD
January 8, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MUMBAI, India - In the latest salvo of a surprisingly bitter diplomatic feud, the Indian government on Wednesday ordered the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi to cease commercial activities at a popular club for Americans on its premises. The demand comes as U.S. officials weigh whether to prosecute an Indian diplomat in New York on charges that she obtained fraudulent visa documents for her housekeeper and violated labor laws by paying her far below minimum wage. The case involving Devyani Khobragade, the Indian deputy consul general in New York, has touched off a furor here and prompted officials in New Delhi to take a number of retaliatory steps against Americans in the Indian capital.
WORLD
December 23, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - The reports are cranked out with relentless efficiency: blistering tales of waste, fraud and abuse of American taxpayer-funded projects to rebuild Afghanistan. The damning audits from the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction strike like missiles at the U.S. Embassy and military headquarters here. Trumpeted by an aggressive public relations effort, SIGAR findings cause heartburn among American diplomats and generals alike. Saying they are sometimes unfairly targeted, those in the cross hairs are now seeking to more effectively highlight their efforts to rectify shortcomings.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | Associated Press
Arab radicals opposed to the Mideast peace conference fired a rocket at the U.S. Embassy compound in East Beirut on Tuesday. The missile struck a wall but caused no injuries or serious damage to the building in the Christian suburb of Aukur, said Lebanese Defense Minister Michel Murr. An anonymous caller to a Western news agency later claimed responsibility on behalf of the Arab Revolutionary Brigades, a previously unknown group.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | From Times wire services
The two aides Secretary of State James A. Baker III sent to Moscow to inspect the U.S. Embassy in the Soviet capital have recommended that part of the chancery be salvaged, a Bush Administration official said today. Their recommendation is to dismantle the top floors, which are believed to be riddled with eavesdropping devices, and to replace them with bug-free floors or an adjoining annex, said the official, who demanded anonymity.
WORLD
September 19, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Embassy in Caracas warned Venezuelans against any violent effort to topple President Hugo Chavez, who survived a two-day coup in April. The embassy said the U.S. government was concerned about rumors and ads in local media urging Venezuela's military to oust the "constitutional and democratically elected government of Venezuela." The Bush administration drew criticism after seeming to acquiesce in Chavez's temporary ouster. U.S.
WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The Russian government has cut off broadcasts of Voice of America after a leading state media figure denounced the U.S. government-funded radio as "spam on our frequencies. " VOA's contract with the Russian media oversight agency wasn't renewed after it expired at the end of March because the Kremlin could no longer tolerate "its subversive, sanctimonious, self-serving propaganda," the Voice of Russia said in its account of the cutoff. The internal silencing of the broadcasts that beamed news and cultural programs into the Soviet Union during the Cold War represented the latest attempt by the Kremlin to eliminate media providing an alternative to those whose content and editors are controlled by the Russian government.
OPINION
April 9, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The United States is irked that Iran has chosen as its representative to the United Nations a diplomat who apparently was involved with a student group that seized the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979. The embassy takeover, a violation of international law that led to the 444-day captivity of 52 American hostages, contributed to hostility between the two countries that only recently has begun to abate. But the Obama administration is making a mistake in publicly labeling as "not viable" the posting to the U.N. of Hamid Aboutalebi, an experienced diplomat aligned with Iran's reformist President Hassan Rouhani.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - One year after a 25-year-old diplomat from the Chicago area was killed in a car bombing in southern Afghanistan, the U.S. Embassy in Kabul remembered Anne Smedinghoff on Monday by reading poetry and releasing balloons in a courtyard that was named for her. “She was a truly remarkable young woman and friend,” U.S. Ambassador James B. Cunningham said in a solemn ceremony on a sun-splashed afternoon in Kabul. The River Forest, Ill., native is the only State Department diplomat to die in the 13-year war in Afghanistan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Johanna Neuman
Robert S. Strauss, a one-time chairman of the Democratic National Committee and a Washington insider who combined earthy Texas charm with raw political power, died Wednesday. He was 95. A spokesman for Strauss' Washington law firm, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, confirmed his death but would release no other details. A U.S. trade representative in the Carter administration, Strauss was a poker-playing, cigar-chomping, power-lunch-eating rainmaker who was so successful at recruiting mega-clients that he stopped billing by the hour in the 1970s.
WORLD
February 27, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING -- As the United States' first Chinese American ambassador to China, Gary Locke made an impression on many ordinary people here with his down-to-earth ways - carrying his own backpack, paying for his Starbucks with a coupon and flying economy class. His man-of-the-people demeanor, honed as two-term governor of Washington state, provided a sharp contrast to the often-remote and sometimes corrupt ways of the Chinese ruling class. Many netizens approved of his style, but a number of media organs affiliated with the Communist Party were discomfited by the unassuming envoy.
WORLD
February 12, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO -- An Egyptian employee of the U.S. Embassy has been detained by police since Jan. 25, an embassy spokesman said Wednesday. The jailed staffer was identified as Ahmed Eleiba. Associates said his work involved monitoring developments concerning political Islam in Egypt -- a sensitive subject in the wake of the popularly supported military coup that deposed Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in July. The incident reflected an increasingly aggressive stance by the Egyptian police and judiciary toward anyone suspected of even a tangential connection with the Muslim Brotherhood or any other Islamist group.
NEWS
January 7, 1987
Suspected drug traffickers threatened to blow up the U.S. Embassy in Bogota, Colombia, and the building was evacuated and will be closed for two days because of the threat, police said. Officers from a special bomb unit searched the five-story building. An embassy aide said the bomb threat came after President Virgilio Barco ordered the arrests of suspected traffickers throughout Colombia. More than 300 people were seized in the roundup, the largest ever of drug traffickers in Colombia.
WORLD
January 31, 2014 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - Before serving as an interpreter for the U.S. military, Shafiq Nazari passed exhaustive background checks by U.S. military and intelligence agencies. The military trusted him enough to issue him an automatic rifle. He has fired it during several firefights with insurgents, fighting shoulder to shoulder with U.S. soldiers and Marines on about 200 combat missions in Afghanistan. Nazari, 38, a compact man with short-cropped hair and a trim black beard, has been issued a badge that gives him free run of a high-security U.S. base in downtown Kabul, where he translates for U.S. military advisors.
WORLD
January 26, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO -- A young Los Angeles man working in Egypt as a freelance translator and journalist was freed four days after being detained by Egyptian authorities, the U.S. Embassy said Sunday. Jeremy Hodge, 26, had been picked up on Wednesday at his Cairo apartment by police who also detained his Egyptian roommate, Hossam Meneai, a filmmaker. Meneai was still being held, according to friends of the two. A U.S. Embassy official confirmed Hodge's release, but had no further comment on the case because of privacy considerations.
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