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U S Enrichment Corp

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BUSINESS
June 30, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Clinton administration on Monday said it will sell its uranium-processing corporation as required under a 1992 law. The sale of U.S. Enrichment Corp., which processes uranium for nuclear power reactors, is expected to yield the government between $1.85 billion and $2.15 billion in a direct public offering. The company will sell 100 million shares of stock at between $13.50 and $16.50 a share and pay the U.S. Treasury an additional $500 million. In a letter to Sen.
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BUSINESS
June 30, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Clinton administration on Monday said it will sell its uranium-processing corporation as required under a 1992 law. The sale of U.S. Enrichment Corp., which processes uranium for nuclear power reactors, is expected to yield the government between $1.85 billion and $2.15 billion in a direct public offering. The company will sell 100 million shares of stock at between $13.50 and $16.50 a share and pay the U.S. Treasury an additional $500 million. In a letter to Sen.
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NEWS
September 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Energy Secretary Bill Richardson ordered a 24-hour "safety stand down" at the agency's Paducah, Ky., uranium plant after a preliminary probe uncovered lapses in programs designed to protect workers from harmful radiation. The announcement is expected to idle about 400 workers for a day while officials begin a comprehensive review of training and radiation monitoring at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's atomic energy minister accused the United States on Tuesday of reneging on a crucial post-Cold War agreement to help finance Russian nuclear disarmament by buying recycled uranium from dismantled warheads. Viktor N. Mikhailov asserted that the U.S. Enrichment Corp. of Bethesda, Md., a company formed by the American government to buy 500 tons of weapons-grade uranium from Russia and sell it as nuclear reactor fuel, has "bamboozled" Russia by withholding one-third of the promised payment.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2000
John Longenecker, who worked in the Reagan administration, has been named chief executive and president of Nurescell Inc. in Newport Beach. He will continue as a director of the company. Adrian Joseph resigned as chief executive and will serve in the newly created position of chief scientific advisor. James Samuelson resigned as president and will assume the positions of chief financial officer and vice president of operations and will remain a director of the company.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
Federal nuclear regulators are investigating the possible burial of as much as 1,600 tons of nuclear weapon hardware on a 3,000-acre Energy Department site in Kentucky and whether the material poses a health risk to workers there. The Energy Department would confirm only that "an underground classified storage site" at the facility near Paducah, Ky., is being investigated by its officials, the Pentagon and the Justice Department.
NEWS
December 30, 2000 | From Associated Press
Buying more than 100 metric tons of weapons-grade uranium from Russia helped U.S. national security but may be hurting domestic producers as the nation's nuclear power plants become dependent on Russian uranium, congressional auditors said Friday. In 1993, the United States agreed to a 20-year program of buying highly enriched uranium from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons, imported in a form suitable to fuel commercial reactors. The Energy Department created the U.S. Enrichment Corp.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | JOBY WARRICK, THE WASHINGTON POST
It was one of the most secretive missions at a factory that was all about secrecy: Nuclear warheads, retired from service and destined for the junkyard, were trucked at night to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to be dismantled, hacked into unrecognizable pieces and buried. Workers used hammers and acetylene torches to strip away bits of gold and other metals from the warheads' corrosion-proof plating and circuitry. Useless parts were dumped into trenches.
OPINION
October 11, 1998 | Sarah Carey and Charles William Maynes, Sarah Carey, a lawyer, is chair of the Eurasia Foundation. Charles William Maynes is its president
A consensus seems to be developing that the West's response to the crisis in Russia should be to do nothing and instead focus on "who lost Russia." The list of candidates for the latter honor seems to be growing: ailing President Boris N. Yeltsin, corrupt bankers, the obstructionist Duma, naive reformers and a misguided cabal of Harvard economists. Yet, we should prepare for the possibility that we will have to do something.
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