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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Green on the Screen: The U.S. Environmental Film Festival, launched last year in Colorado Springs, Colo., has been permanently relocated to Santa Monica, where it will be held April 25-28. The event, organized by the Pikes Peak Film Council, will showcase more than 100 feature and video films and documentaries dealing with such issues as the equatorial rain forest, oceans, wildlife and world population trends.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Loyola High School sophomore Matthew Leonetti is so angry that he can't go surfing in polluted Santa Monica Bay after it rains that he was driven to shoot a video about it for a biology class assignment. But never did he think that the five-minute video would wind up as part of an environmental film festival opening tonight in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1990 | John M. Wilson
Late last year, when programmer Richard Skorman opened submissions for the First U.S. Environmental Film Festival, he admits that he was "fearful we wouldn't get enough entries." Now, with 138 films and videos submitted from around the world and a total of 200-250 anticipated, "the problem is selecting the final (50-60) films."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Loyola High School sophomore Matthew Leonetti is so angry that he can't go surfing in polluted Santa Monica Bay after it rains that he was driven to shoot a video about it for a biology class assignment. But never did he think that the five-minute video would wind up as part of an environmental film festival opening tonight in Santa Monica.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 125 environmental films and videos from throughout the world will be shown, and more than 100 speakers will hold post-screening discussions at the 1991 Aveda U.S. Environmental Film Festival today through Sunday in Santa Monica. A special film presentation and discussion on the aftermath of the Chernobyl nuclear accident--featuring anti-nuclear activist Dr. Helen Caldicott--will kick off the festival tonight at 7 at the Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel, 1700 Ocean Ave. The cost is $10.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN ZAN DUBIN..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although novice filmmaker Leslie Baer-Brown recently won an award for her documentary about the Yanomami, an indigenous people of South America, her trip to their small Venezuelan settlement did not have a happy ending. The village of Ashetoeateri lies within a biosphere reserve, a 45,000-square-mile area of rain forest meant to protect all Yanomami from outsiders. Gold miners have brought diseases that have already killed scores and that continue to spread.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, Zan Dubin covers the arts for The Times Orange County Edition.
"Yanomami: Keepers of the Flame," a prize-winning documentary written and co-produced by Leslie Baer-Brown of Laguna Hills about an indigenous South American people, will have its Orange County premiere Friday at 8 p.m. at the Disneyland Hotel in Anaheim. Baer-Brown traveled to the Amazon jungle last fall to make the film, which won first prize in this year's U.S. Environmental Film Festival.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Terry Moore hefts her camcorder and trudges off to 10 hours of dump patrol. "I'm just a local citizen exercising my right to document what's going on at the landfill," the Indiana farm woman says. Six months and a couple of congressional testimonies later, she is on the "Phil Donahue Show." He asks her, "What got you so pumped up about this?" She replies with a level gaze, "Without the video, the message that the East Coast trucks were using Indiana as an illegal dump would not have gotten out.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Green on the Screen: The U.S. Environmental Film Festival, launched last year in Colorado Springs, Colo., has been permanently relocated to Santa Monica, where it will be held April 25-28. The event, organized by the Pikes Peak Film Council, will showcase more than 100 feature and video films and documentaries dealing with such issues as the equatorial rain forest, oceans, wildlife and world population trends.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1990 | John M. Wilson
Late last year, when programmer Richard Skorman opened submissions for the First U.S. Environmental Film Festival, he admits that he was "fearful we wouldn't get enough entries." Now, with 138 films and videos submitted from around the world and a total of 200-250 anticipated, "the problem is selecting the final (50-60) films."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1991 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Caulfield is the founder and executive director of the International Environmental Film Festival in Boulder, Colo., which debuted March 13-17. and
There's delicious, dark irony to be reaped from any news report of contentiousness or bullying among environmentally minded groups, and to describe Charles Jonkel's International Wildlife Film Festival in Missoula, Mont., as "threatened by a host of environmental imitators" ("It's a Jungle Out There," by Ann Japenga, Calendar, April 11) set that story squarely within such a context. The truth isn't as dicey.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
Matt Leonetti had no idea that his film about pollution in Santa Monica Bay would create such a stir. Last week, the senior at Loyola High School in Los Angeles was selected as runner-up of the 1992 President's Environmental Youth Awards. Although the project was completed nearly two years ago when the Pacific Palisades resident was a sophomore, "The Drain" has attracted a lot of publicity nationwide. It was recently featured at the U.S.
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