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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley
Sam Hamilton, head of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and a 30-year veteran of wildlife and habitat conservation, suffered a fatal heart attack while skiing in Colorado on Saturday afternoon. He was 54. His death at Keystone Ski Area was confirmed by the Summit County coroner's office in Colorado. Hamilton was a career Fish and Wildlife employee whom President Obama nominated last year to lead the agency. Born in 1955 in Starkville, Miss., Samuel D. Hamilton joined the Youth Conservation Corps on the Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge in Mississippi when he was 15 and later earned a bachelor's degree in biology from Mississippi State University.
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OPINION
June 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the more than two decades since the U.S. government declared chimpanzees in the wild to be an endangered species, not much has improved for those great apes. The threats of habitat loss, poaching and disease have only intensified. Now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed reclassifying captive chimpanzees as well, moving them from the "threatened" category to "endangered," a change that brings with it stricter guidelines covering the handling and use of the animals. In the future, any procedure that harms, harasses or kills a research chimp would require a permit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2000
A regional office of a federal wildlife agency that oversees development in six Southern California counties has a heavy workload and poor system of record-keeping that may be responsible for permit delays, an audit released Thursday found. The Carlsbad office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service also has a high staff turnover, which may add to the time it takes the agency to evaluate a project and ensure it doesn't harm endangered or threatened species, according to the report by U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Federal wildlife officials took the unprecedented step Friday of telling private companies that they will not be prosecuted for inadvertently harassing or even killing endangered California condors. In a decision swiftly condemned by conservationists and wildlife advocates, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said operators of Terra-Gen Power's wind farm in the Tehachapi Mountains will not be prosecuted if their turbines accidentally kill a condor during the expected 30-year life span of the project.
OPINION
August 5, 2008
Even when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did the right thing by the gray wolves of the northern Rockies, it managed to do the wrong thing. A 13-year effort to reintroduce the wolf to the region has been an extraordinary success, with the count increasing from an initial 66 to a stable and growing population of more than 1,500. Numbers like those clearly invited a call for taking the wolves off the endangered species list.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2009 | Julie Cart
The news was mixed this week as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that it would move forward on a review of 29 plant and animal species and assess their inclusion on the federal endangered species list. The fact that the agency is considering listing any species represents a change from the last eight years. But the service also rejected petitions for nine species, including the ashy storm-petrel, a California seabird. For those who submitted petitions that were denied, the situation appeared dire.
OPINION
June 16, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the more than two decades since the U.S. government declared chimpanzees in the wild to be an endangered species, not much has improved for those great apes. The threats of habitat loss, poaching and disease have only intensified. Now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed reclassifying captive chimpanzees as well, moving them from the "threatened" category to "endangered," a change that brings with it stricter guidelines covering the handling and use of the animals. In the future, any procedure that harms, harasses or kills a research chimp would require a permit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Among listings for fraying couches and used television sets, the Craigslist ad stood out — $2,800 for a prized Asian arowana fish, believed to bring good luck and ward off evil spirits. A grammatically challenged buyer from Las Vegas sent the seller an email expressing interest: "Is she a super red asian arowana? I all ready have all the other species and I need the endangered one to finilize my collection. " The seller responded cautiously — "Are you a cop?" she allegedly wrote in one text message — but ultimately agreed to meet the buyer at Laguna Hills Mall for the handoff.
NEWS
April 6, 2004 | Carl Ingram and David Haldane, Times Staff Writers
The State Lands Commission on Monday took what environmentalists hope will be a final step in the decades-long battle to restore the Bolsa Chica wetlands in Huntington Beach to their pristine condition of a century ago. In a 3-0 vote, the commission -- a major administrator of the site -- granted a four-year lease to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which is expected to start restoring about 550 acres Oct. 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said this week that it would not tolerate the harm or killing of an endangered California condor during construction of a proposed Newhall Ranch community of 60,000 residents along the Santa Clara River. In a long-awaited, 178-page opinion, the agency also said, however, that it would allow the developer to capture and relocate one condor during the next 25 years, if necessary, according to agency wildlife biologist Rick Farris. "We anticipate that there might be some occasion over the 25 years in which a California condor may become attracted to some human activity such as construction of a house," Farris said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
An environmental group has warned that a federal agency's plan to designate 98.4 acres as critical habitat for an endangered plant in western Riverside County is inadequate and could result in the extinction of the species. In response to a lawsuit by the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service earlier this month designated the small area just west of Lake Elsinore as critical habitat for Munz's onion. The wildlife agency also rejected the center's request for it to protect habitat for the endangered San Jacinto Valley crownscale, which inhabits portions of the San Jacinto River flood plain near Hemet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has decided to allow sea otters to roam freely down the Southern California coastline, abandoning its program to relocate the voracious shellfish eaters from waters reserved for fishermen. Federal officials determined that their sea otter trans-location program had failed after 25 years and thus they were terminating it, according to a decision published in the Federal Register on Wednesday. "As a result, it allows sea otters to expand their range naturally into Southern California," the notice said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2012 | By Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Among listings for fraying couches and used television sets, the Craigslist ad stood out — $2,800 for a prized Asian arowana fish, believed to bring good luck and ward off evil spirits. A grammatically challenged buyer from Las Vegas sent the seller an email expressing interest: "Is she a super red asian arowana? I all ready have all the other species and I need the endangered one to finilize my collection. " The seller responded cautiously — "Are you a cop?" she allegedly wrote in one text message — but ultimately agreed to meet the buyer at Laguna Hills Mall for the handoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The California golden trout — the official state fish — will not receive protection under the Endangered Species Act after a 10-year review of scientific information and conservation programs, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Friday. "Conservation measures throughout the trout's historic range have done much to protect the species," service spokeswoman Sarah Swenty said in a statement. "In large part because of those measures, the service determined that the intensity of threats does not indicate the species is endangered, or likely to become so in the foreseeable future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2011 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Francisco -- The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday that the Franciscan manzanita — a plant so rare that only one is believed to be growing in the wild — "warrants protection" and proposed declaring the elusive shrub endangered. The announcement kicks off a 60-day public comment period to allow the federal agency to figure out whether it is possible or necessary to designate and protect habitat critical to the plant's survival and to finalize its determination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said this week that it would not tolerate the harm or killing of an endangered California condor during construction of a proposed Newhall Ranch community of 60,000 residents along the Santa Clara River. In a long-awaited, 178-page opinion, the agency also said, however, that it would allow the developer to capture and relocate one condor during the next 25 years, if necessary, according to agency wildlife biologist Rick Farris. "We anticipate that there might be some occasion over the 25 years in which a California condor may become attracted to some human activity such as construction of a house," Farris said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has decided to allow sea otters to roam freely down the Southern California coastline, abandoning its program to relocate the voracious shellfish eaters from waters reserved for fishermen. Federal officials determined that their sea otter trans-location program had failed after 25 years and thus they were terminating it, according to a decision published in the Federal Register on Wednesday. "As a result, it allows sea otters to expand their range naturally into Southern California," the notice said.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2009 | By David Fleshler
Manatees may rank lower than traditional military menaces like torpedoes or air-to-sea missiles. But a proposal to protect additional habitat for the deceptively gentle, seagrass-munching creatures could, according to the U.S. Navy, end up reducing habitat for destroyers, aircraft carriers and nuclear submarines. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service soon will make a decision on whether to expand what's called critical habitat for the manatee in Florida and southern Georgia, in response to a petition from several environmental groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2010 | By Jim Tankersley
Sam Hamilton, head of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and a 30-year veteran of wildlife and habitat conservation, suffered a fatal heart attack while skiing in Colorado on Saturday afternoon. He was 54. His death at Keystone Ski Area was confirmed by the Summit County coroner's office in Colorado. Hamilton was a career Fish and Wildlife employee whom President Obama nominated last year to lead the agency. Born in 1955 in Starkville, Miss., Samuel D. Hamilton joined the Youth Conservation Corps on the Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge in Mississippi when he was 15 and later earned a bachelor's degree in biology from Mississippi State University.
NATIONAL
December 28, 2009 | By David Fleshler
Manatees may rank lower than traditional military menaces like torpedoes or air-to-sea missiles. But a proposal to protect additional habitat for the deceptively gentle, sea-grass-munching creatures could, according to the U.S. Navy, end up reducing habitat for destroyers, aircraft carriers and nuclear submarines. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service soon will make a decision on whether to expand what's called critical habitat for the manatee in Florida and southern Georgia, in response to a petition from several environmental groups.
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