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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1988 | MAYERENE BARKER, Times Staff Writer
The last target-shooting area open free to the public in the Saugus district of Angeles National Forest closed Wednesday, a victim of high maintenance costs brought about by the illegal acts of some of its users. Jim McGauley, a U.S. Forest Service district assistant recreation officer, said the Dry Gulch shooting range in recent years had been turned into a dumping ground by shooters who brought everything from mannequins to television sets to the area to use for target practice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Emily Alpert Reyes, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
Scores of people who suffered damage when the Powerhouse fire scorched stretches of northern Los Angeles County are suing the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, alleging the utility started the massive blaze and failed to properly maintain power lines and equipment. The fire destroyed dozens of homes and burned more than 30,000 acres over the course of several days last year. U.S. Forest Service officials have estimated the cost of battling the blaze at more than $16 million.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Ari Bloomekatz
A 23,000-acre wildfire in Riverside County is two miles from Palm Springs, bumping up against Idyllwild, and is the top priority of the U.S. Forest Service, officials said Thursday. The Mountain fire started at 1:43 p.m. Monday near the intersection of state highways 243 and 74, but "it seems like several years ago now with everything we've done,” said U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Jeanne Pincha-Tulley at a news conference Thursday. The fire has burned through at least 22,800 acres and several homes near Idyllwild and remains only 15% contained.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
On picturesque winter slopes, the youngsters racing snowboards downhill and the mature skiers calmly gliding down have routinely been cast as warring snow-lovers. A Utah ski resort has tried to keep feuding off its slopes by banning snowboards altogether since the 1980s. Four middle-aged snowboarders are protesting that policy, filing a lawsuit  in January. The snowboarders sued Alta Ski Area and the U.S. Forest Service in U.S. District Court in Utah. They argue that their constitutional right to equal use of federal land had been irrationally denied and that the Forest Service, working in concert with Alta, allowed discrimination in violation of the snowboarders' due process rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1991 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
A longtime U. S. Forest Service official who says he never expects a pat on the back for a job he loves has been named "Host of the Year" by his colleagues. John Boggs, recreation assistant in the Ojai Ranger District of Los Padres National Forest, was chosen for the award over candidates representing all 18 national forests in California.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
The U.S attorney's office in San Diego announced Wednesday that it has given 7.6 acres of land near Cleveland National Forest that was seized in a drug bust almost six years ago to the U.S. Forest Service for recreational use. The exchange marked the first time forfeited land has been transferred to any government agency in San Diego County, said U.S. Atty. William Braniff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2002 | From Associated Press
Three firefighters were killed and two others injured early Sunday when a U.S. Forest Service fire engine patrolling the perimeter of a wildfire in the Klamath National Forest drove off a logging road and rolled 800 feet down a mountainside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1996 | MARY F. POLS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With time and the regenerative forces of nature on their side, U.S. Forest Service officials have concluded that there is no point in reseeding any of the 10,425 acres burned in the fire that raged from Fillmore to Santa Paula earlier this month.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | JOHN LANCASTER, The Washington Post
Mountains rose abruptly from a sapphire-blue sea as the tiny bush plane droned lazily toward Chichagof Island. Seen from a distance, forests unfolded as carpets of green, flawless and unbroken. Then rocky peaks and alpine meadows flashed by the wing tips, and the forest took on a different character. Patches of cleared land and scrub showed the effect of heavy logging. In some places, whole valley bottoms had been scraped bare, leaving only the least-valuable timber at higher elevations.
OPINION
January 24, 1993
The U.S. Forest Service's recent decision to restrict logging in California's national forests is a recognition that, certainly in the case of wildlife, it's possible to study a question to death. The California spotted owl is not yet listed as endangered, but the Forest Service has classified it as a "sensitive species."
SCIENCE
March 26, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A federal appeals court sided with the state of Alaska on Wednesday in a ruling that could open a large portion of the Tongass National Forest to road building and logging. In a split decision, a panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a ruling by a district court, which found that the U.S. Forest Service had improperly exempted the Tongass from a 2001 rule banning new roads and timber harvesting on relatively pristine national forestland across the country. But it's unclear what the practical effects of the new ruling will be. The panel sent the case back to the lower court to decide whether the Forest Service needs to prepare environmental documents for the exemption.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
BRIDGEWATER, Va. - The headwaters of the Potomac River rise amid the hills and hollows of George Washington National Forest in Virginia. Small creeks dart past oak, white pine and hickory, become streams that nourish farmland and towns, and create a river that courses through two states and the nation's capital. About 4 million people depend on that water. For decades, the U.S. Forest Service identified preserving its purity as the top priority for the national forest. Now, the agency is considering allowing George Washington to become the first national forest to permit high-volume hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
After being driven for days by dry weather and high winds, the Colby fire was 78% contained Sunday morning, officials said, as firefighters made significant gains on the blaze near Glendora and Azusa. The last mandatory evacuation order in connection with the wildfire was lifted Saturday at 6 p.m., when the 1,000 residents of the Mountain Cove community were allowed to return home. California 39 in the area remains closed. Steep terrain in the vicinity will be the biggest challenge moving forward, said U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman L'Tagna Watson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2014 | By Jason Wells and Ari Bloomekatz
The Colby fire that broke out near Glendora, north of Los Angeles on the edge of the Angeles National Forest, exploded in size Thursday morning as dry brush, steep terrain and winds made for rough firefighting conditions. Nathan Judy, a spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service, said the fire had grown to at least 125 acres by 8 a.m. and that it was moving quickly “going up and down the hills.” The fire was reported shortly before 6 a.m. Judy said that when he arrived at the scene early Thursday morning the fire had burned only four acres.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun, Kate Mather and Soumya Karlamangla
Firefighters battling the Colby fire burning near Glendora, northeast of Los Angeles, made headway Thursday afternoon, stopping the march of the fire toward hillside homes. Fire officials announced at their 4:30 p.m. briefing that the fire is 30% contained. In all, 1,700 acres have burned - the same acreage as several hours earlier. Five homes have been destroyed and 17 additional structures were damaged. “The forward spread of the fire has stopped,” Los Angeles County Fire Chief John Tripp said, adding that the hazard to the community is subsiding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The U.S. Forest Service is proposing an extensive salvage operation to log dead trees on about 46 square miles of timberland charred in last year's massive Rim fire in the Sierra Nevada. The project would be one of the largest federal salvage efforts in California in years. If approved, it could yield more lumber than the combined annual output of all the national forests in the state. But it is already triggering a fight by some environmentalists who argue that the post-fire logging would destroy valuable habitat for rare birds and other species that thrive in blackened forests.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mark Jennings, a biologist with the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, can remember the exact day when, as a boy growing up in Ventura County, he found his first yellow-legged frog in Santa Paula Creek near his home. That was in May, 1970, and when he returns these days to visit his parents in Santa Paula, he still goes looking for those frogs. Only there aren't any more. "When you walked the creek then, you saw foothill yellow-legged frogs sunning themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2008 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
California sued the U.S. Forest Service on Thursday over plans that would open more than 500,000 acres to roads and oil drilling in the state's largest national forests. The four Southern California forests -- Los Padres, Angeles, San Bernardino and Cleveland -- comprise more than 3.5 million acres that stretch from Big Sur to the Mexican border. They provide habitat for 31 threatened or endangered animal species, including the California condor, and 29 such plant species.
OPINION
December 27, 2013
Re "Making the Rim fire worse," Editorial, Dec. 24 The emotional need to make the black go away after a wildfire, in addition to financial incentives, lead to counterproductive actions such as salvage logging, massive tree-planting projects and irrational clearance of valuable chaparral, California's distinctive shrubland habitat. Instead, we need patience; The Times' editorial makes this point clear. Salvage logging would only make the Rim fire damage worse by interfering with the natural healing process, encouraging the spread of flammable weeds, and would repeat mistakes the U.S. Forest Service made after a 1987 fire in the same area.
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