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U S Holocaust Memorial Museum

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TRAVEL
June 9, 1996
Travelers heading for Washington, D.C., can now reserve tickets to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in advance. Tickets are free on a first-come basis at the museum but often are gone early each day; reserved tickets are $1.75 each plus a $1-per-order fee. Call (800) 400-9373.
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NATIONAL
September 3, 2009 | Del Quentin Wilber, Wilber writes for the Washington Post.
The 89-year-old white supremacist accused of killing a guard at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in June had planned the attack for months and was on a suicide mission, a federal prosecutor said in court Wednesday. The disclosure came during a brief hearing in Washington federal court during which the suspect, James von Brunn, spoke publicly for the first time since the June 10 shooting. "The Constitution guarantees me a speedy and fair trial," Von Brunn said in a halting voice.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2006 | From Associated Press
A director at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum was named Tuesday to head the museum that will commemorate the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York City. Alice M. Greenwald will oversee the creation of the World Trade Center Memorial Museum, an underground gallery of exhibits planned next to the memorial that marks the footprint of the destroyed twin towers. Groundbreaking is scheduled for next month; the museum and memorial are slated to open in 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Miles Lerman, who fought the Nazis in Poland and later helped found the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, has died. He was 88. Lerman's wife, Rosalie, confirmed Wednesday that he died Tuesday at his home in Philadelphia. Born in Poland, Lerman was a member of a prosperous family whose flour mills were seized by Nazis. Lerman escaped from a slave labor camp and fought the Nazis with other partisans for nearly two years in the forests of his homeland.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A month after he refused to escort Palestinian Leader Yasser Arafat on a tour of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, Walter Reich has been removed as director, museum officials said. Reich said in a statement that he will not seek to renew his three-year contract, which expires in June. Reich will "relinquish his duties" March 31, the museum announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Miles Lerman, who fought the Nazis in Poland and later helped found the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, has died. He was 88. Lerman's wife, Rosalie, confirmed Wednesday that he died Tuesday at his home in Philadelphia. Born in Poland, Lerman was a member of a prosperous family whose flour mills were seized by Nazis. Lerman escaped from a slave labor camp and fought the Nazis with other partisans for nearly two years in the forests of his homeland.
NEWS
April 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
Visitors waited in line up to four hours to be among the first inside as the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum opened to the public on Monday. Minutes before the doors opened, the Dalai Lama of Tibet toured the museum and prayed for the millions killed in the World War II Holocaust. He was the first of many international spiritual figures expected to visit the building, which was dedicated last week. The first wave of public visitors included many homosexuals, one of the targets of the Nazis.
OPINION
August 18, 2003 | Walter Reich
U.S. officials want Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas to visit a Holocaust museum. They have the right idea but the wrong museum. The museum they have in mind is in Washington. The one to which he should go is in Jerusalem. Abbas wrote a book that distorted, denied or minimized core facts of Holocaust history.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | From Associated Press
President Clinton welcomed world leaders and Holocaust survivors Wednesday on the eve of the opening of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, which he said will stand as "a sharp thorn in every national memory." Clinton and his wife, Hillary, joined 900 guests at a reception under a tent on the South Lawn in a steady rain.
NEWS
January 17, 1998 | From the Washington Post
Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat, persuaded by Clinton administration officials to pay a groundbreaking visit to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum here next week, angrily canceled the plan after museum officials rebuffed his overture. Conceived as a gesture of reconciliation by Aaron Miller, U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2007 | Arthur Max, Associated Press
When Bill Connelly heard that the heirs of a collector of Jewish memorial books were cleaning out his library, he rushed to New York and fished dozens of the Yiddish-language volumes out of a municipal trash bin. With their lists of residents from long-vanished European communities -- sometimes recorded street by street -- the books often are all that's left of entire villages or neighborhoods consumed in the Nazi genocide of World War II.
NEWS
November 5, 2006 | Ron Grossman, Chicago Tribune
Dina Babbitt once made a deal with Josef Mengele, the notorious Nazi doctor who subjected concentration-camp prisoners to horrendous medical experiments. He needed someone to illustrate his perverse racial theories with portraits of Auschwitz's Gypsy prisoners, an inferior group according to Nazi ideology. A trained artist, she agreed to do the work as the price of saving her mother, as well as herself, from the concentration camp's gas chamber.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2006 | From Associated Press
A director at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum was named Tuesday to head the museum that will commemorate the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York City. Alice M. Greenwald will oversee the creation of the World Trade Center Memorial Museum, an underground gallery of exhibits planned next to the memorial that marks the footprint of the destroyed twin towers. Groundbreaking is scheduled for next month; the museum and memorial are slated to open in 2009.
OPINION
August 18, 2003 | Walter Reich
U.S. officials want Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas to visit a Holocaust museum. They have the right idea but the wrong museum. The museum they have in mind is in Washington. The one to which he should go is in Jerusalem. Abbas wrote a book that distorted, denied or minimized core facts of Holocaust history.
NEWS
June 26, 2002 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Elie Wiesel had a mission: to see that the memoirs of Holocaust survivors made it into print. But the Nobel Peace Prize winner and author couldn't find anyone--not mainstream publishers, not even Jewish organizations--who wanted to take on the task. Wiesel says this situation reflects what happened right after World War II, when "nobody wanted to publish these stories. They were too sad, too morbid. Then, at one point, there were too many.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John K. Roth can perhaps be forgiven for not expecting controversy when he won a high-ranking federal position in Washington. He was, after all, going to direct research and scholarship at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, a job more academic than political. But before Roth, a Claremont McKenna College philosophy professor and respected Holocaust scholar, could even head East, he came under attack by no less than the Jewish press, national columnist George Will and a couple of congressmen.
NEWS
October 17, 1985 | SARAH OATES, Times Staff Writer
From the horrors of Nazism to the slaying of American hostage Leon Klinghoffer, continuing terrorism makes it imperative to remember "what human beings can do to other human beings," government and Jewish leaders said Wednesday in breaking ground for the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Terror must be fought wherever it is aimed against innocent civilians," Elie Wiesel, chairman of the U.S.
NEWS
June 26, 2002 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Elie Wiesel had a mission: to see that the memoirs of Holocaust survivors made it into print. But the Nobel Peace Prize winner and author couldn't find anyone--not mainstream publishers, not even Jewish organizations--who wanted to take on the task. Wiesel says this situation reflects what happened right after World War II, when "nobody wanted to publish these stories. They were too sad, too morbid. Then, at one point, there were too many.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A month after he refused to escort Palestinian Leader Yasser Arafat on a tour of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, Walter Reich has been removed as director, museum officials said. Reich said in a statement that he will not seek to renew his three-year contract, which expires in June. Reich will "relinquish his duties" March 31, the museum announced.
NEWS
January 17, 1998 | From the Washington Post
Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat, persuaded by Clinton administration officials to pay a groundbreaking visit to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum here next week, angrily canceled the plan after museum officials rebuffed his overture. Conceived as a gesture of reconciliation by Aaron Miller, U.S.
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