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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like the mythical phoenix that rose from its own ashes, a partially abandoned housing tract in Lancaster is getting a second chance at life. A Costa Mesa-based developer, Pacific-Teal Development Inc., plans to immediately begin repairing the 21 dilapidated homes at the Silverado housing development, more than five years after the original developer halted work. Homes will also be built on two Silverado lots where, since 1988, there has been only cement foundations and tumbleweeds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like the mythical phoenix that rose from its own ashes, a partially abandoned housing tract in Lancaster is getting a second chance at life. A Costa Mesa-based developer, Pacific-Teal Development Inc., plans to immediately begin repairing the 21 dilapidated homes at the Silverado housing development, more than five years after the original developer halted work. Homes will also be built on two Silverado lots where, since 1988, there has been only cement foundations and tumbleweeds.
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REAL ESTATE
September 8, 1985
March completion is planned for a $3-million, 15,000-square-foot office building under construction at 134 N. Kenwood Ave., Burbank. The developer is U.S. Housing Corp., Burbank, and the leasing agent is Zugsmith & Associates Inc., Studio City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster officials agreed Monday to pay the federal government $1.4 million for 22 unfinished houses in a tract that was abandoned nearly four years ago when its builder and banker failed in the savings and loan crash. City Council members, acting as Lancaster's redevelopment agency, voted 4 to 0 to buy the unfinished portion of the Silverado tract from the federal Resolution Trust Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mel Gibson and Danny Glover need houses to burn for their upcoming action movie "Lethal Weapon III." Lancaster has a half-built, abandoned housing tract that city officials would like to see leveled. Could it be a match made in Hollywood? The hottest scene since sets standing in for Atlanta were torched for "Gone With the Wind"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1993 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The city of Lancaster is preparing to take possession of a pair of partially built housing tracts that were abandoned by developers and then taken over by the federal government. On Monday, Lancaster's redevelopment agency and City Council entered into an agreement to use the city's eminent domain power to acquire portions of the Silverado tract. The city redevelopment agency is also expected to acquire the unfinished Legends tract. The two tracts are now controlled by the Resolution Trust Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster's Redevelopment Agency voted Monday to spend $3.2 million to buy an abandoned housing tract, a portion of which was burned in filming the movie "Lethal Weapon 3," from the federal agency that manages the assets of failed savings and loans. The purchase of The Legends tract by the city follows a similar $1.4-million deal last month with the federal Resolution Trust Corp. to buy the unfinished portion of its sister tract, Silverado.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mel Gibson and Danny Glover need houses to burn for their upcoming action movie "Lethal Weapon III." Lancaster has a half-built, abandoned housing tract that city officials would like to see leveled. Could it be a match made in Hollywood? The hottest scene since the sets standing in for Atlanta were torched for "Gone With the Wind"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly two years of frustrating negotiations with the federal Resolution Trust Corp., city officials say they have finally struck a deal to pay nearly $3.1 million to buy one failed housing project and the abandoned portion of another that had become eyesores. In dual votes Monday night, the Lancaster City Council and Redevelopment Agency decided to pursue a so-called "friendly condemnation" of The Legends tract and the unfinished portion of the Silverado tract from the RTC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attempt to rid the city of a pair of eyesores, Lancaster officials decided Monday to try to buy the remains of two housing tracts that have sat partially built and abandoned for more than two years as fallout from the nation's savings and loan crisis. City Council members, meeting as the city's Redevelopment Agency, voted 4 to 0 to submit an offer for the Legends and Silverado tracts to the federal Resolution Trust Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1990 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antelope Valley builders talk with disgust about a construction site crime wave that has accompanied a recent housing boom--and with amazement at the sheer industriousness of thieves who pillage unfinished houses like locusts. "They take cabinets, plumbing fixtures," said Andrew Eliopulos, vice president of J.P. Eliopulos Enterprises Inc. in Lancaster. "They take lumber, doors, windows, sinks, toilets, tools.
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