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U S League Of Savings Institutions

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BUSINESS
November 5, 1989 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, the U.S. League of Savings Institutions had clout that few trade groups enjoy. It picked people who regulated it. It wrote laws that sailed through Congress, and torpedoed ones that it didn't like. It wined and dined politicians nightly. Most of the time it got its way. "The league was all powerful," said Edwin J. Gray Jr., who regulated the thrift industry from 1983 to 1987 as head of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board. Now the good times are over.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 1989 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, the U.S. League of Savings Institutions had clout that few trade groups enjoy. It picked people who regulated it. It wrote laws that sailed through Congress, and torpedoed ones that it didn't like. It wined and dined politicians nightly. Most of the time it got its way. "The league was all powerful," said Edwin J. Gray Jr., who regulated the thrift industry from 1983 to 1987 as head of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board. Now the good times are over.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1989
Pasadena-based Mutual Savings & Loan Assn. has withdrawn from an industry trade group to protest the organization's lobbying stand on S&L bailout legislation. The trade group--the U.S. League of Savings Institutions--has been trying to persuade Congress to ease some of the tougher new capital standards contained in a bill designed to save crippled S&Ls. In a letter to the league Tuesday, Mutual Savings Chairman Charles T. Munger said his institution was leaving because it objects to those efforts.
REAL ESTATE
June 4, 1989 | Bradly Inman
Size of the American Home: Median size of: Square feet New homes 1,540 Existing homes 1,440 Homes bought by 1,292 first-time buyers Source: U.S. League of Savings Institutions
BUSINESS
February 22, 1989
Schorr's column indicates that the FSLIC in connection with its supervisory transactions rescues stockholders of failed institutions. This simply is untrue. When the FSLIC arranges a merger or acquisition of a failed institution involving the payment of federal financial assistance, the shareholders of the insolvent party are wiped out--not rescued. FREDERICK L. WEBBER President U.S. League of Savings Institutions Washington, D.C.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1989
Pasadena-based Mutual Savings & Loan Assn. has withdrawn from an industry trade group to protest the organization's lobbying stand on S&L bailout legislation. The trade group--the U.S. League of Savings Institutions--has been trying to persuade Congress to ease some of the tougher new capital standards contained in a bill designed to save crippled S&Ls. In a letter to the league Tuesday, Mutual Savings Chairman Charles T. Munger said his institution was leaving because it objects to those efforts.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1985
The U.S. League of Savings Institutions reported that a nationwide survey of 900 savings institutions indicated that 1.64% of all residential loans were delinquent for 60 days or more in September, down from 1.76% in August. William B. O'Connell, the group's president, said that, aside from month-to-month fluctuations, mortgage delinquencies had been on a downward trend from their 1985 peak of 2.22% in January.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1988
Orange County is the most expensive housing market of 25 metropolitan areas included in a survey by the U.S. League of Savings Institutions, with a median home price of 175,000. A profile of the average Orange County homebuyer shows that the buyer is about the same age as the national median, but has a median household income 17% higher, and incurs monthly housing expenses 27% higher than the national medians. (Related story, Part I, Page 1.
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