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BUSINESS
January 17, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Where does the U.S. electronics industry go from here, following the collapse of U.S. Memories, a proposed $350-million joint venture of the nation's biggest computer and semiconductor companies to produce basic memory chips? The idea behind U.S.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | JONATHAN WEBER, Times Staff Writer
Sanford L. Kane worked in finance jobs for most of his 27 years at IBM, but he says he's always enjoyed getting his hands dirty on the shop floor. That might be just the right combination for the venture he has been named to run, U.S. Memories Inc., which will have to combine manufacturing excellence with tight cost controls to prosper in the fiercely competitive computer memory chip market. "I didn't sit in my office and read reports. I got out onto the site," Kane said of a stint as controller of an IBM plant in Fishkill, N.Y. "The longer you spend in a place like that, the more you appreciate the genius" of the work force.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Sanford Kane, the end of U.S. Memories came swiftly and without any advance warning last Wednesday in a Dallas hotel room. After meeting all morning with representatives of 11 electronics firms--seven that had already agreed to support the novel chip-making cooperative and four others that had been straddling the fence--Kane told the group that it was time to finally count how much money everyone was willing to give the venture. With that, "the room got real quiet, real fast," Kane, U.S.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A first meeting of the founding members of U.S. Memories has been called amid growing signs that the proposed $1-billion semiconductor manufacturing cooperative may fold before getting off the ground. Although a spokeswoman for the proposed venture declined to say where and when the meeting will be held, she said an announcement regarding the venture's fate could be expected sometime next week.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Sanford Kane, the end of U.S. Memories came swiftly and without any advance warning last Wednesday in a Dallas hotel room. After meeting all morning with representatives of 11 electronics firms--seven that had already agreed to support the novel chip-making cooperative and four others that had been straddling the fence--Kane told the group that it was time to finally count how much money everyone was willing to give the venture. With that, "the room got real quiet, real fast," Kane, U.S.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two more U.S. electronics manufacturers said Wednesday that they will not join U.S. Memories, the fledging consortium designed to spur the domestic semiconductor industry against Japanese competition. The news raised new concerns that the novel venture may not get off the ground by its self-imposed deadline in six weeks. The latest rejections came from Sun Microsystems, a fast-growing Silicon Valley computer maker, and Unisys, the nation's third-largest electronics manufacturer.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Where does the U.S. electronics industry go from here, following the collapse of U.S. Memories, a proposed $350-million joint venture of the nation's biggest computer and semiconductor companies to produce basic memory chips? The idea behind U.S.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Memories, an ambitious venture to wrest control of the vital computer memory chip market from the Japanese, officially folded on Monday, a victim of lackluster support from the American electronics industry it was designed to aid.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A first meeting of the founding members of U.S. Memories has been called amid growing signs that the proposed $1-billion semiconductor manufacturing cooperative may fold before getting off the ground. Although a spokeswoman for the proposed venture declined to say where and when the meeting will be held, she said an announcement regarding the venture's fate could be expected sometime next week.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sanford L. Kane was flush with success last June when he publicly unveiled plans for U.S. Memories, a semiconductor manufacturing cooperative that he would lead. After all, the venture--designed to provide a domestic source of key computer memory chips--was backed by a veritable "Who's Who" of American high-technology companies, and it promised to solve one of the industry's most vexing problems: Japanese domination of the memory chip market. Then reality set in.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sign behind T. J. Rodgers' desk reads simply: "Be reasonable, demand the impossible." But what happens when the best known of Silicon Valley's new generation of computer chip makers doesn't get what he wants? "Gee, I don't know," reflects his assistant. "It's never happened." It didn't happen in 1983 when Rodgers, then age 35 and with one semiconductor failure already under his belt, persuaded Silicon Valley's top venture capitalists to put up $7.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1990 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Memories, an ambitious venture to wrest control of the vital computer memory chip market from the Japanese, officially folded on Monday, a victim of lackluster support from the American electronics industry it was designed to aid.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sanford L. Kane was flush with success last June when he publicly unveiled plans for U.S. Memories, a semiconductor manufacturing cooperative that he would lead. After all, the venture--designed to provide a domestic source of key computer memory chips--was backed by a veritable "Who's Who" of American high-technology companies, and it promised to solve one of the industry's most vexing problems: Japanese domination of the memory chip market. Then reality set in.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two more U.S. electronics manufacturers said Wednesday that they will not join U.S. Memories, the fledging consortium designed to spur the domestic semiconductor industry against Japanese competition. The news raised new concerns that the novel venture may not get off the ground by its self-imposed deadline in six weeks. The latest rejections came from Sun Microsystems, a fast-growing Silicon Valley computer maker, and Unisys, the nation's third-largest electronics manufacturer.
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