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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Gold coins worth $10 million that were discovered by a Northern California couple were not likely stolen in a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, an official said Tuesday. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter. In 1901, six bags of double eagle gold coins -- 250 $20 coins in each -- went missing from the San Francisco Mint.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
Last year, a couple walking the usual route around their California Gold Country property happened upon a can sticking out of the ground. They pulled it out and uncovered seven others, all filled with hundreds of U.S. gold coins. Experts announced the find last month after a year of work researching and authenticating the 1,427 coins, worth an estimated $10 million. But the origin of the Saddle Ridge hoard remains a tantalizing mystery, one that has coin buffs and amateur sleuths on the case.
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NATIONAL
April 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Mint agreed to pay $9 million to female workers at its Denver plant who alleged their bosses demanded sex in exchange for promotions, harassed them, and retaliated when they complained. The deal must be approved by an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission judge. About 130 women could share in the settlement if it is approved, said Lynn Feiger, who represented the workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A senior expert at the firm representing a Northern California couple who discovered buried gold coins worth $10 million says he  has not received any credible claims to the huge find and does not expect to. Numerous theories have cropped up since the discovery of the Saddle Ridge Hoard was announced last week. One of them, that the coins were tied to  a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, appeared to be debunked Tuesday by the U.S. Mint itself. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Most folks can correctly name George Washington as the nation's first president. After that, things get tricky. The U.S. Mint is hoping its new dollar coin series will help refresh some hazy memories about the names of Adams, Jefferson and the rest. That could be a tall order, however, given the results of a poll the Mint commissioned. According to the survey conducted by Gallup Organization, nearly all those questioned knew that Washington was the first president.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | Associated Press
No, they don't hand out free samples at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia. And no, you cannot buy a $1 bill hot off the press. Dollar bills are not made in this government factory just a few blocks from Independence Hall. They make coins here, about $1-million worth a day--buckets, tubs, vats full of shiny, alluring coins. So many that you might have an urge to plunge your hands into them all the way up to your elbows, just to enjoy the feeling of them. You can't do that, of course.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Mint, by sparking a boom in coin collecting, is making a mint. Thanks largely to the popularity of the Mint's state-themed quarter program--adding tens of millions of Americans into coin collecting--the government agency posted a $2.6-billion profit in fiscal 2000. That money goes to fund government programs and reduce the national debt.
SPORTS
November 4, 1994 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the most hopeful sports fans were long ago disabused of the notion that politics and sport don't mix. Olympic boycotts and demonstrations to serve political ends have illustrated clearly that--as is the case in most other aspects of our lives--the business of politics permeates. Now, a new wrinkle in the marriage of politics and sports: commemorative coins. The politically connected honchos of the World Cup Organizing Committee got Rep. Esteban E. Torres (D-Calif.
NATIONAL
October 5, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
After nearly 100 years of depicting presidents in somber profile on the nation's coins, the U.S. Mint is trying something different: The 2006 nickel will feature Thomas Jefferson facing forward, with the hint of a smile. "It isn't a silly smile or a smirk, but a sense of optimism that I was trying to convey with the expression," said Jamie Franki, an art professor who created the design.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1986
The U.S. Mint temporarily sold out of the new gold coins on the second day of sales because of an avalanche of orders from dealers. Sales were suspended until Oct. 27, when the mint expects to have another 100,000 ounces in freshly minted coins, Eugene Essner, deputy director of the mint, said. "The program has been a tremendous success beyond our expectations," he added.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
“Gold fever” is still alive, a California historian said after last week's discovery of more than 1,400 coins buried on a Northern California couple's gold country property. The historic find, believed to be the most valuable in North America, has had people around the world buzzing since the announcement by numismatic firm Kagin's Inc., which evaluated the hoard and is representing the couple. “There's something about gold, ever since the days of legendary King Midas, it's just incredible people's response to this,” said Gary Kurutz, director of special collections at the California State Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
The news of a Northern California couple's discovery of more than 1,400 gold coins hidden on their property has experts, history buffs and regular folks speculating on the treasure's origin. Though officials said it is unlikely the coins were stolen in a turn-of-the-century theft at the U.S. Mint in San Francisco, some wonder if the cache could be one of many believed buried by the  Knights of the Golden Circle . The secretive, subversive Confederate group is thought to have hidden millions in ill-gotten gold across a dozen states to finance a second Civil War. PHOTOS: California couple discovers cache of gold coins The coins very well could be a fortune buried by a wealthy businessman, but the time period, markers near the cache and manner in which the coins were buried fit the mold of the KGC, said Warren Getler, a former Wall Street Journal reporter who coauthored “Rebel Gold,” a book about the group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Gold coins worth $10 million that were discovered by a Northern California couple were not likely stolen in a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, an official said Tuesday. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter. In 1901, six bags of double eagle gold coins -- 250 $20 coins in each -- went missing from the San Francisco Mint.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2009 | By Hugo Martín
The idea behind credit cards that offer airline rewards is simple enough: The more you spend on the card, the more free airline miles you get. But the U.S. Mint recently broke up a scheme by cardholders who figured out a way to get money for nothing and rewards for free. Under the scheme, people used their credit cards to purchase dollar coins from the U.S. Mint. They then deposited the coins in the bank to pay off the credit card balance. In the end, the cardholders were out no money but their credit cards registered thousands of dollars' worth of spending, and thus they earned thousands of rewards points or miles from the airlines.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2007 | DAVID LAZARUS, CONSUMER CONFIDENTIAL
Some government announcements are so weird, you know there just has to be a story there. And in this case, there is. The United States Mint -- you know, the guys who make your money -- issued a news release this week declaring that $130 refunds were being offered to anyone who bought a 2004 Lewis and Clark commemorative coin that was accompanied by a handcrafted pouch produced by Ohio's Shawnee Nation United Remnant Band.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Most folks can correctly name George Washington as the nation's first president. After that, things get tricky. The U.S. Mint is hoping its new dollar coin series will help refresh some hazy memories about the names of Adams, Jefferson and the rest. That could be a tall order, however, given the results of a poll the Mint commissioned. According to the survey conducted by Gallup Organization, nearly all those questioned knew that Washington was the first president.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | Associated Press
It looks like George Washington might be a little jealous of all the attention Sacagawea is getting on the new $1 coin. One of the rare dollars, which are made at the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia, was discovered in Arkansas with the front of a Washington quarter and the back of a Sacagawea dollar. It is believed to mark the first error of its kind in the Mint's 208-year history--and the coin could fetch as much as $100,000, experts say. "It's ironic when you think that the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Samantha Schaefer
A senior expert at the firm representing a Northern California couple who discovered buried gold coins worth $10 million says he  has not received any credible claims to the huge find and does not expect to. Numerous theories have cropped up since the discovery of the Saddle Ridge Hoard was announced last week. One of them, that the coins were tied to  a 1901 U.S. Mint theft in San Francisco, appeared to be debunked Tuesday by the U.S. Mint itself. “We do not have any information linking the Saddle Ridge Hoard coins to any thefts at any United States Mint facility,” U.S. Mint spokesman Adam Stump said in a statement, adding that lawyers have looked into the matter.
OPINION
November 25, 2006
AS ANY SPORTS FAN knows, there's no better scientific method for settling a dispute than flipping a coin. As we hope the U.S. Mint knows, there's no better way to replace the outdated dollar bill than with the commemorative $1 coins introduced this week. The coins, which bear the images of U.S. presidents, are being touted as educational. But is there a numismatic hidden agenda? The Mint is discouraging any such speculation.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Mint agreed to pay $9 million to female workers at its Denver plant who alleged their bosses demanded sex in exchange for promotions, harassed them, and retaliated when they complained. The deal must be approved by an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission judge. About 130 women could share in the settlement if it is approved, said Lynn Feiger, who represented the workers.
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