Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsU S Politics
IN THE NEWS

U S Politics

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
March 24, 1991 | Chris Goodrich
FROM THE WARD TO THE WHITE HOUSE: The Irish in American Politics by George E. Reedy (Charles Scribner's Sons: $22.50; 188 pp.). George Reedy, press secretary to Lyndon Johnson and now a professor of journalism at Marquette, disclaims any academic pretensions for this book, and it's a good thing; he makes all kinds of unsubstantiated generalizations about the rise and gradual decline of the Irish in U.S. politics.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 20, 2014 | By Peter H. Schuck
Campaign finance reformers are worried about the future. They contend that two Supreme Court rulings - the McCutcheon decision in March and the 2010 Citizens United decision - will magnify inequality in U.S. politics. In both cases, the court majority relaxed constraints on how money can be spent on or donated to political campaigns. By allowing more private money to flow to campaigns, the critics maintain, the court has allowed the rich an unfair advantage in shaping political outcomes and made "one dollar, one vote" (in one formulation)
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born in Soviet Armenia 25 years ago, Armen Orujyan always believed he was destined for bigger things. He read such weighty tomes as Alexander Dumas' trilogy or "War and Peace" to prepare for political intrigue. He ran for student body president at Valley College and won. He interned at City Councilman Joel Wachs' office and volunteered for Al Gore's presidential campaign. On Thursday, the Hollywood resident will graduate from Valley College with honors.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
AURORA, Colo. - Nic Showalter and Richard Rutledge view the world across a wide gulf. Showalter, a Democrat, sees President Obama blocked at every turn by intransigent Republicans. Rutledge, a Republican, sees a swollen-headed president running roughshod over opponents. For that reason, both are glad Obama has sought congressional approval before attacking Syria. Showalter thinks it will hold Republican lawmakers accountable. Rutledge says it's the way checks and balances ought to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Vote for Me: Politics in America" is highly relevant without mentioning Nov. 5. Airing on PBS in two parts tonight and Tuesday, it's a near landslide of an election special, a four-hour timeless primer as persuasive and seductive as an artful campaign pitch. Credit filmmakers Louis Alvarez, Andrews Kolker and Paul Stekler and the political culture they capture so perceptively and entertainingly. Quips a chatty political leader in Oklahoma: "Politics is show business for ugly people."
OPINION
May 12, 1991 | Kevin Phillips, Kevin Phillips, publisher of the American Political Report, is the author of "The Politics of Rich and Poor" (Random House)
Question: After what recent war did the Republicans in the White House, ready for a triumphant overhaul of U.S. politics and domestic policy, find themselves enmeshed in widening accusations of grand-scale political espionage and nervous defense of an embarrassing vice president? Answer: After Vietnam, in early 1973. But perhaps also now, after the Gulf War. Therein lies one of the most fascinating "ifs" taking shape in the murk--and sleaze--of U.S. politics.
OPINION
April 20, 2014 | By Peter H. Schuck
Campaign finance reformers are worried about the future. They contend that two Supreme Court rulings - the McCutcheon decision in March and the 2010 Citizens United decision - will magnify inequality in U.S. politics. In both cases, the court majority relaxed constraints on how money can be spent on or donated to political campaigns. By allowing more private money to flow to campaigns, the critics maintain, the court has allowed the rich an unfair advantage in shaping political outcomes and made "one dollar, one vote" (in one formulation)
OPINION
November 30, 2003 | Kevin Phillips, Kevin Phillips is the author, most recently, of "Wealth and Democracy: A Political History of the American Rich."
The presidential election of 2000 was one of the low points of modern U.S. politics. But the upcoming 2004 nomination contests have the potential to be exciting. Either or both conventions could be electrifying affairs. Democrats may have the first multi-ballot convention since 1952, which could be a disaster or an unexpected opportunity.
OPINION
September 20, 1998 | Suzanne Garment, Suzanne Garment, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. She is the author of "Scandal: The Culture of Mistrust in American Politics."
James Joyce instructed his readers to be alert to life's epiphanies, those moments when distractions fall away and essential reality reveals itself. The Clinton mess is such an epiphany, illuminating the nature of modern U.S. politics. You don't have to be a very receptive soul to see it. This epiphany does not just hang around waiting to be appreciated; it accosts you on the street and grabs you by the throat.
OPINION
December 22, 1991 | Stuart Butler and Will Marshall, Stuart Butler is director of domestic and economic policy studies at the Heritage Foundation. Will Marshall is director of the Progressive Foundation
Something odd is happening in U.S. politics: Elements of the left and right are coalescing around a post-ideological agenda for America. Evidence that such a politics is emerging comes not only from think tanks and political theorists, but also from innovations that defy traditional labels. Consider: --In New York, Andrew Cuomo's private HELP program offers decent housing for homeless people at two-thirds the cost of lodging them at the city's welfare hotels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2013 | Elaine Woo
Robert N. Bellah, a UC Berkeley sociologist who turned the analysis of religion's role in American society into a bestselling book and a thriving academic pursuit, died Tuesday at an Oakland hospital. He was 86. The cause was complications after heart surgery, said his daughter, Jennifer Bellah Maguire. Bellah made his mark with a provocative 1967 essay titled "Civil Religion in America," which argued that a central feature of the American political tradition was the belief in God as a higher authority over the nation.
OPINION
January 6, 2013 | By Bill Whalen
A century ago on Jan. 9, Richard Nixon was born in a Southern California agricultural subdivision dubbed Yorba Linda, in a 900-square-foot mail-order house assembled by his father. The centennial of America's 37th president won't be met with much fanfare beyond this weekend's wreath-laying at that home and a Nixon Foundation dinner Wednesday in Washington. Although the Nixon Library has other centennial-related events planned for 2013, there's little of the hoopla that accompanied the 100th birthday of California's other president, Ronald Reagan, two years ago. Like another former Republican president, Nixon is a victim of unfortunate political timing.
NEWS
October 7, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said Sunday he doesn't think the scandal over his affair with a family housekeeper has cost him credibility as a high-profile political voice in the nation. “I don't think so, but let me tell you, if the people are angry at me, I deserve that,” Schwarzenegger said on NBC's “Meet the Press.” “There was a major screw-up. … I've hurt my wife. I've hurt the kids. I think they went through a  lot of pain because of that and I take the responsibility.” Schwarzenegger has been doing TV interviews to promote his new autobiography, “Total Recall: My Unbelievably True Life Story.” As governor, he was a frequent guest on “Meet the Press” and rose to be a major moderate voice within the Republican Party.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
Who's the most influential billionaire business figure in national politics? If you answered one of the Koch brothers (Charles or David) or George Soros, you're wearing your partisan blinders. The former are known for their devotion to conservative causes, the latter to liberal. In either case, you're wrong. The most influential billionaire in America is Peter G. Peterson. The son of Greek immigrants, Peterson, 86, served as Commerce secretary under President Nixon, then became chairman and chief executive of Lehman Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Animal Planet's new reality show "Law on the Border" follows the K-9 unit of the Nogales Police Department as members "wage war" on crime in the Arizona border town, i.e., as they attempt to keep the drug smugglers, money launderers and purveyors of illegal immigrants on the other side of the three-mile-long, 20-foot-high fence. It is neither the first reality show to follow law enforcement officials patrolling the Mexican border - National Geographic has "Border Wars," ABC had "Homeland Security, USA" - nor is it the first to showcase the talents of a K-9 unit - Animal Planet already has "K-9 Cops" to its credit.
OPINION
August 23, 2012 | By Rafael Medoff
One does not usually think of the conventions of the major U.S. political parties as having any particular impact on Jewish history. But 68 years ago, the Republican National Convention adopted a plank that would shape the future of U.S.-Israel relations and redefine the role of Jewish voters in American politics. This surprising turn of events was the result of efforts by an unlikely trio: a former president, a maverick journalist-turned-congresswoman and the father of Israel's current prime minister.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
AURORA, Colo. - Nic Showalter and Richard Rutledge view the world across a wide gulf. Showalter, a Democrat, sees President Obama blocked at every turn by intransigent Republicans. Rutledge, a Republican, sees a swollen-headed president running roughshod over opponents. For that reason, both are glad Obama has sought congressional approval before attacking Syria. Showalter thinks it will hold Republican lawmakers accountable. Rutledge says it's the way checks and balances ought to work.
OPINION
December 14, 1997
Speaking of politics, we can take comfort in the realization that America is greater than the sum of its parties. RUSS TRAVIS Bakersfield
NATIONAL
March 12, 2012 | By David Horsey
The HBO movie “Game Change” may not be the whole story, but it is a true story about Sarah Palin and the power of ineptitude in American politics. Palin and her partisans have trashed the movie for one very good reason: no matter how sympathetic to Palin's personal predicament the film may be, the central plot point is that John McCain and his campaign team picked a shockingly unprepared person to be his running mate. Steve Schmidt, McCain's senior political advisor, and other top campaign operatives were primary sources for the book on which “Game Change” was based.
WORLD
February 13, 2012 | By Paul Richter and Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
U.S. and Chinese officials have spent three years carefully planning how to introduce the man likely to be the next Chinese leader to an American audience. But with China coming in for sharp criticism as the U.S. presidential campaign got into full swing, some Chinese officials briefly wondered whether they should postpone Xi Jinping's goodwill tour. Xi's five-day visit, which begins Tuesday when he meets President Obama, is an essential step in the world's most important power relationship.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|