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U S Robotics Inc

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BUSINESS
March 26, 1996
Smith Micro Software Inc. has clarified its software distribution agreement with U.S. Robotics Inc., saying the pact was reached with its U.S. Robotics Access Corp. unit. Smith Micro, which provides communication software for personal computers, had said last week that it would supply its software for all of U.S. Robotics Inc.'s modems. That news sent Smith Micro stock up $1.25 to close at $9.75 a share Thursday on the Nasdaq market.
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BUSINESS
August 16, 2005
As expected, Platinum Equity, a buyout company owned by billionaire Tom Gores, agreed to acquire struggling computer modem maker U.S. Robotics Corp. Terms weren't disclosed.
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BUSINESS
October 20, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Modem Makers to Merge: U.S. Robotics Inc. and Megahertz Holding Corp., leading makers of personal computer modems, agreed to merge in a stock transaction valued at $213 million. The deal blends U.S. Robotics' strength in desktop modems with Megahertz's power as the No. 1 maker of credit card-sized modems for portable computers. Projected revenue next year is $650 million. Megahertz will become a subsidiary of Skokie, Ill.-based U.S. Robotics but will maintain its operation in Salt Lake City.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2001 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Robotics Corp., the Chicago-area modem manufacturer that spun off from 3Com Corp. in September, set up shop in Irvine this week to focus on culling emerging products that the company hopes to sell under its name. The Schaumburg, Ill., company is the No. 1-selling brand for external analog, or dial-up modems. But as that market slows with the flailing personal computer market and the advent of new technologies, U.S.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Shares of U.S. Robotics Inc., down 20% since Wednesday's earnings report, are considered a buy by some analysts who expect the company's modem business to gain. The stock, which dropped 1 49/64 Friday to 52 3/4, "was inexpensive before; now it's cheap," said Steven Levy, an analyst at Oppenheimer & Co. His "buy" recommendation is based on his belief that the stock will rise to near $130 in the next 12 months. Late Wednesday, U.S.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2005
As expected, Platinum Equity, a buyout company owned by billionaire Tom Gores, agreed to acquire struggling computer modem maker U.S. Robotics Corp. Terms weren't disclosed.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2001 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Robotics Corp., the Chicago-area modem manufacturer that spun off from 3Com Corp. in September, set up shop in Irvine this week to focus on culling emerging products that the company hopes to sell under its name. The Schaumburg, Ill., company is the No. 1-selling brand for external analog, or dial-up modems. But as that market slows with the flailing personal computer market and the advent of new technologies, U.S.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like almost everyone else returning from the Comdex computer trade show last week, a small group of Rockwell employees boarding an Orange County-bound jet were carrying T-shirts and other trinkets they picked up at the show. But the Rockwell group took particular delight in displaying T-shirts they had snatched from the U.S. Robotics booth. It was as if the Rockwell employees had captured an enemy's flag, and in some ways, they had.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1997 | LESLIE HELM
For you online junkies hooked on the World Wide Web but frustrated by the sluggish performance of your modem, there is good news and bad news headed your way. The good news is that next month several dozen companies plan to begin offering modems that transfer data at 56 kilobits per second, twice the rate of the 28.8 modems now widely in use, for prices as low as $89. The bad news is that modem suppliers have split into two camps, with Skokie, Ill.-based U.S.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
International Business Machines Corp. on Wednesday reported a 1.2% drop in first-quarter profit as revenue from computers and software was dragged down by a sharp rise in the dollar's value. The slower growth in revenue overshadowed surging demand for computer services from the world's largest computer company. Still, IBM managed to beat analysts' expectations for profit on a per-share basis, which were boosted by the company's repurchase of $2 billion in stock during the quarter.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
International Business Machines Corp. on Wednesday reported a 1.2% drop in first-quarter profit as revenue from computers and software was dragged down by a sharp rise in the dollar's value. The slower growth in revenue overshadowed surging demand for computer services from the world's largest computer company. Still, IBM managed to beat analysts' expectations for profit on a per-share basis, which were boosted by the company's repurchase of $2 billion in stock during the quarter.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
3Com Corp.'s shares fell 10% Thursday, erasing $660 million from its $6.6-billion offer for U.S. Robotics Corp., amid investor concern that the acquisition will hurt earnings in coming quarters. 3Com shares plunged $4 to $35 on Nasdaq, the lowest closing price since August 1995. 3Com's stock-swap offer now values U.S. Robotics at $61.25 a share--just 25 cents above the stock's price before Wednesday's offer. U.S. Robotics shares fell $1.875 to $59.125 on Nasdaq on Thursday.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1997 | LESLIE HELM and JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a surprise move that reflects intensifying competition and consolidation in the rapidly growing $24-billion computer networking business, Santa Clara, Calif.-based 3Com Corp. said Wednesday that it will acquire modem giant U.S. Robotics Corp. for about $7.33 billion in stock. With the purchase, 3Com would have 12,000 employees and annual sales of about $5 billion, putting it on par with networking leader Cisco Systems Inc.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1997 | LESLIE HELM
For you online junkies hooked on the World Wide Web but frustrated by the sluggish performance of your modem, there is good news and bad news headed your way. The good news is that next month several dozen companies plan to begin offering modems that transfer data at 56 kilobits per second, twice the rate of the 28.8 modems now widely in use, for prices as low as $89. The bad news is that modem suppliers have split into two camps, with Skokie, Ill.-based U.S.
BUSINESS
November 25, 1996 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like almost everyone else returning from the Comdex computer trade show last week, a small group of Rockwell employees boarding an Orange County-bound jet were carrying T-shirts and other trinkets they picked up at the show. But the Rockwell group took particular delight in displaying T-shirts they had snatched from the U.S. Robotics booth. It was as if the Rockwell employees had captured an enemy's flag, and in some ways, they had.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Robotics Develops High-Speed Modem: The Skokie, Ill.-based modem manufacturer said it has developed a computer modem that can operate at 56 kilobits per second--a new high in transmission speed--and is comparable to high-speed integrated services digital networks. U.S. Robotics said the x2 modem will be available to customers in the first quarter of 1997. The fastest dial-up modem currently on the market is 33.6 kilobits per second.
BUSINESS
February 28, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
3Com Corp.'s shares fell 10% Thursday, erasing $660 million from its $6.6-billion offer for U.S. Robotics Corp., amid investor concern that the acquisition will hurt earnings in coming quarters. 3Com shares plunged $4 to $35 on Nasdaq, the lowest closing price since August 1995. 3Com's stock-swap offer now values U.S. Robotics at $61.25 a share--just 25 cents above the stock's price before Wednesday's offer. U.S. Robotics shares fell $1.875 to $59.125 on Nasdaq on Thursday.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Shares of U.S. Robotics Inc., down 20% since Wednesday's earnings report, are considered a buy by some analysts who expect the company's modem business to gain. The stock, which dropped 1 49/64 Friday to 52 3/4, "was inexpensive before; now it's cheap," said Steven Levy, an analyst at Oppenheimer & Co. His "buy" recommendation is based on his belief that the stock will rise to near $130 in the next 12 months. Late Wednesday, U.S.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1996
Smith Micro Software Inc. has clarified its software distribution agreement with U.S. Robotics Inc., saying the pact was reached with its U.S. Robotics Access Corp. unit. Smith Micro, which provides communication software for personal computers, had said last week that it would supply its software for all of U.S. Robotics Inc.'s modems. That news sent Smith Micro stock up $1.25 to close at $9.75 a share Thursday on the Nasdaq market.
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