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NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer won't seek Montana's open U.S. Senate seat in 2014, a blow to Democrats' hopes of holding the seat and preserving their overall Senate majority. The popular Democrat, who left the governor's office in 2013 after two terms, told the Associated Press that he “kicked the tires” on the race but decided he preferred Montana to Washington. “There are all kinds of people that think I should be in the U.S. Senate. But I never wanted to be in the U.S. Senate,” he said.
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NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
HONOLULU - In primaries across the country - in Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi and other states - Republicans are locked in a heart-and-soul battle between purists and pragmatists clashing over what it means to represent the party, its philosophy and core values. Here in Hawaii there's a similar fight over power and purpose, but this one is between Democrats. It's a fight for a U.S. Senate seat, a rare enough prize in a state that has elected just six people senator since statehood in 1959.
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NATIONAL
April 23, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
HONOLULU - In primaries across the country - in Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi and other states - Republicans are locked in a heart-and-soul battle between purists and pragmatists clashing over what it means to represent the party, its philosophy and core values. Here in Hawaii there's a similar fight over power and purpose, but this one is between Democrats. It's a fight for a U.S. Senate seat, a rare enough prize in a state that has elected just six people senator since statehood in 1959.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - For decades the Republican Party prided itself for being tough on crime, often putting Democrats on the defensive by pushing for longer, mandatory sentences for convicts. In 1988, that hard-line stance helped sink the presidential dreams of then-Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis, who was blamed in Republican TV ads for having released convicted killer Willie Horton as part of a weekend furlough program. (Horton failed to return after a furlough and went on to commit robbery and rape.)
NATIONAL
June 23, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
John Barrasso, a conservative Republican state senator, was named as the country's newest U.S. senator to succeed the late Craig Thomas. The temporary appointment, announced by Wyoming's governor, is immediate but won't change the Senate's party breakdown since Thomas was also a Republican. Thomas died June 4 while being treated for leukemia. Barrasso, 54, will serve until the beginning of 2009.
NATIONAL
August 14, 2004 | From Associated Press
Alan Keyes said Friday he would like to end the system under which the people elect U.S. senators and return to the pre-1913 practice in which senators were chosen by state legislatures. The Republican Senate candidate in Illinois, asked about past comments on the election process, said the constitutional amendment that provided for popular election of senators upset the balance between the people and the states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1998
BARBARA BOXER A first-term senator, Boxer leads in primary polling, despite postponing advertising until a Republican opponent for November is chosen. * Political Party: Democrat * Age: 57 * Residence: Greenbrae * Education: Bachelor's degree in economics, Brooklyn College * Career highlights: Stockbroker; journalist; Marin County Board of Supervisors, 1976-82; U.S. House of Representatives, 1983-93; U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1993
What a difference a new perspective can make, especially in the close-knit, tradition-bound Senate. Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun of Illinois, the Senate's only African-American member, touched off a riveting debate Thursday that provided an unusual display of heart among her colleagues. Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) tried to slip into the national service bill an amendment to preserve the design patent of the United Daughters of the Confederacy--a laurel wreath encircling the flag of the Confederacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1990
Adaptability, the human species' greatest biological strength, also is the source of some of our most pernicious failings, for it too often allows us to accommodate what should not be tolerated. A striking case in point is the dominant influence money has come to exert on this nation's electoral politics. Whatever we may say we desire of our leaders, the system by which we choose them insists that they be not statesmen or philosophers or law-givers, but financiers.
NEWS
August 6, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
A Republican-led effort to bar President Clinton from launching an invasion of Haiti without congressional approval crumbled when the GOP split over how far to go in challenging Administration policy. The invasion ban was rejected 63 to 31 after senators of both parties warned that such a move would tie the President's hands and usurp his powers as commander in chief.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Scott Brown finally took the plunge. And this time he kept his shirt on. The former senator from Massachusetts, after keeping politicos in Washington and his newly adopted home state of New Hampshire guessing for months, announced Friday that he had formed an exploratory committee to run for U.S. Senate in the Granite State this year. The step -- he called it the start of a "Main Streets & Living Rooms Tour" -- is short of a full commitment to run for the seat held by first-term Democrat Jeanne Shaheen.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
A U.S. politician's I-don't-need-no-stinkin'-facts approach to health policy ran smack into some of those troublesome facts Tuesday at a Senate hearing on single-payer healthcare , as it's practiced in Canada and several other countries. The countries in question have successful and popular government-sponsored single-payer systems, provide universal coverage and match or outdo the United States on numerous measures of medical outcomes -- for far less money than the U.S. spends.
NEWS
March 6, 2014 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON--The Dalai Lama, the exiled spiritual leader of Tibet , delivered the opening invocation in the U.S. Senate on Thursday, praying "to Buddha and all" and suggesting that purity of thought will guide humanity's actions. In his saffron robe, the Dalai Lama climbed the few steps to the Senate dais and delivered the three-line prayer, first in the Tibetan language, then in English. He chuckled over his English pronunciation. "With our thoughts we make our world," the prayer began.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Cathleen Decker
A new Gallup poll suggested Monday why Republicans running in some of the most contested U.S. Senate races this year will be campaigning fiercely against President Obama, even as their Democratic counterparts strive to make the races about anything but him. Among the ten states where the president was most unpopular in 2013 are three seen as highly competitive in 2014: Montana, where Sen. Max Baucus will be leaving after six terms; Alaska, where...
OPINION
January 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
In one of the many news reports about Liz Cheney's decision to end her bid for the U.S. Senate, Gov. Matt Mead was quoted as saying, "Name recognition and dynasties - that just doesn't fly in Wyoming. " He was trying to explain why the 47-year-old former State Department official, who also happens to be the daughter of Dick Cheney (a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Wyoming for six terms before becoming vice president), didn't catch fire with local voters. Mead's implication was that Wyoming voters think for themselves and aren't swayed by such trivial concerns as family lineage.
WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Maeve Reston
HONOLULU -- President Obama told congressional leaders Sunday that he was closely monitoring the unrest in South Sudan, after four U.S. service members were attacked near Bor, and said he “may take further action to support the security of U.S. citizens, personnel and property, including our Embassy, in South Sudan.” After an aborted rescue mission of U.S. citizens Saturday, 380 U.S. officials and private citizens -- as well as 300 citizens of...
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | BILL STALL and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republican U.S. Senate candidate Bruce Herschensohn said Thursday the United States should be prepared to send American warplanes or ground troops if necessary into the former nation of Yugoslavia to make certain that innocent victims of the civil war are not being persecuted or killed in refugee or prison camps. "We have to have an inspection, no matter the risk," Herschensohn said in a meeting with reporters and editors of The Times. "We have to inspect.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- One of the Senate's longest-serving Republicans said Friday that he would seek reelection in 2014, setting up another intraparty test between the party's old guard and tea party forces. Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran's decision to seek a seventh term - revealed on the eve of his 76th birthday -- was something of a surprise. He raised just more than $53,000 in the most recent fundraising period, and has only $800,000 in the bank. Chris McDaniel, a 41-year-old state senator, entered the race in October and has begun actively campaigning and picking up endorsements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, This column has been corrected, as indicated below.
What kind of woman sells out her sister for a shot at a U.S. Senate seat? How do you tell your sister how happy you are she is marrying her longtime girlfriend, embrace her wife as a member of the family, their children as your niece and nephew, then turn around and tell the nation you oppose gay marriage? For this alone, Liz Cheney, who is running for the Republican U.S. Senate nomination in Wyoming against a longtime conservative incumbent, deserves to lose. Though the Cheney daughters have been sparring in public for months about gay marriage, their disagreement heated up again Sunday when Liz appeared on "Fox News Sunday" and noted, again, that despite what her opponent claims, she opposes gay marriage.
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