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SPORTS
January 18, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A hero in November, unemployed in January. Paul Caligiuri said he was stunned when he learned Monday night that the U.S. Soccer Federation had withdrawn its contract offer to him. But Caligiuri, a midfielder from Santa Monica, said he wants to continue playing for the national team as it prepares for this summer's World Cup in Italy. "I want to be with the team even if I have to play for free," Caligiuri said from the team's training camp in La Jolla. "I hope it doesn't come to that.
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SPORTS
August 5, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three-way race for the presidency of the U.S. Soccer Federation is generating an atmosphere of acrimony and, in its wake, exposing the factionalism that has been a part of soccer's landscape for generations. Today's election will not be merely for the presidency--and the four-year term that will carry through the 1994 World Cup to be held in the United States--but also to set the agenda for the sport at a time of great change and much promise.
SPORTS
August 21, 1995 | GRAHAME L. JONES
The 1995-96 English season began over the weekend amid news that the 20 clubs in the Premier League spent a staggering $142.8 million buying new players during the summer, many from overseas. Newcastle United, under the care of former England national team captain and future national team coach Kevin Keegan, was the biggest spender at more than $21.7 million. Liverpool made one of the largest individual purchases, breaking the British record by paying Nottingham Forest $13.
SPORTS
February 27, 1995 | GRAHAME L. JONES
The United States stunned almost everyone in 1991 when it won the gold medal at the Pan American Games in Cuba, defeating Mexico in the final. Four years later, similar success seems very unlikely. This time, the Games will take place in Mar del Plata, Argentina, from March 10-25, and Coach Timo Liekoski's U.S. team has the unenviable task of playing the host country in its opening match. The Americans play Argentina on March 12, Paraguay on March 14 and Honduras on March 16.
SPORTS
September 23, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Asked how long it would take to catch the Soviet Union in soccer, United States Coach Lothar Osiander said generations. Unfortunately for the U.S. Olympic team, it had only 42 minutes Thursday night after the Soviets had taken an insurmountable 4-0 lead 3 minutes into the second half at Taegu Stadium. The United States managed to make the outcome respectable, scoring twice in the final 21 minutes against a relaxed Soviet defense.
SPORTS
November 30, 1995 | WENDY WITHERSPOON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decisions, decisions. The Irvine High girls' soccer team--and the rest of the Orange County girls' soccer community--waited for one important decision last week. Katie Roda, a senior midfielder, was considering playing for the Southern California Blues women's team rather than with the Vaqueros this season. Roda could not do both because it is against Southern Section rules. With Roda, the Vaqueros are expected to be among the best five teams in the county.
SPORTS
August 22, 1991 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alan Rothenberg, president of the U.S. Soccer Federation, toured the Kremlin Monday in Moscow, even as military vehicles rolled through the streets outside. Although he and his wife, Georgina, were told beforehand that it had been announced on state radio that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was ill and had resigned, Rothenberg was unprepared for the sight that greeted him as he left the Kremlin.
SPORTS
July 8, 1999 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Of all the wonders they have seen during their trips from sea to shining sea, one vision of America remains fixed in the minds of players on China's Women's World Cup team. "We've been in several cities here and we have seen lots of girls playing soccer on fields," said Wang Junsheng, head of the Chinese delegation. "That is incomparable with other countries." Those girls may play in the next Women's World Cup tournament, or the one after that. Or they may play professional basketball.
SPORTS
December 9, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Unable since 1950 to go to soccer's World Cup, the United States has changed its tactics. It now is attempting to bring the World Cup to the United States. If the U.S. Soccer Federation (USSF) is successful in its bid for the 1994 World Cup, soccer insiders speculate that the semifinals would be played in the Coliseum and the Rose Bowl, with the final in the Rose Bowl.
SPORTS
June 24, 2010 | By Ken Bensinger
The U.S. soccer team is enjoying its greatest success in 80 years, but the hunt to bring America the World Cup goes far beyond the next two weeks in South Africa. Even as the national squad prepares to play Ghana on Saturday, U.S. soccer officials are racing to secure the country's bid to host the World Cup in 2018 or 2022. Leading the charge is Sunil Gulati, president of the U.S. Soccer Federation and chairman of the USA Bid Committee. In that role, he coordinates efforts to convince the bigwigs of FIFA that the U.S. and not Japan, Qatar, Russia or eight other countries deserve to get the nod. A final decision will be made Dec. 2. In the meantime, win or lose in Johannesburg, Gulati will be focused on one goal.
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