Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsU S Space Camp
IN THE NEWS

U S Space Camp

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1996 | TIM MAY
In this battle of the brains, the sky's no limit. During the next few weeks, kids from five San Fernando Valley elementary schools will compete in a science fair with students from more than a dozen other schools across the city for a chance to win an expense-paid trip to the U.S. Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala. Each of the 22 schools that runs city-sponsored LA's BEST after-school enrichment programs will first sponsor its own science fair.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
An anonymous buyer purchased Space Camp Florida and the Astronaut Hall of Fame for $100,000 at auction. The transaction was made through SC Realty of Birmingham, Ala. Brenda McMillan, a spokeswoman for the two Titusville attractions, said employees were told there was no possibility the sale could save the facilities in their current form. Sluggish attendance after an economic downturn and last year's terrorist attacks hindered Space Camp's ability to pay its debt, officials said.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1997 | DADE HAYES
Three teachers from the San Fernando and Antelope valleys are among 24 U.S. participants in this week's Space Academy for Educators in Florida. The program, one of several U.S. Space Camp programs for adults, began in 1992. It seeks to empower teachers with the ability to inspire students in math and science and give them classroom materials for developing new space- and science-based educational programs, organizers said.
TRAVEL
July 1, 2001 | EILEEN OGINTZ
It's barely 6 a.m., overcast and chilly. We're too busy scrubbing the large stingray tank to notice. In the last 24 hours, the adults and kids in the group have helped build flamingo rookeries, prepared the manatees' lettuce meal and rescued an injured "whale" (an inflatable one). The bravest among us have taken the rigorous swimming test required for animal-trainer wannabes. It poured during the day, and our jeans got soaked.
TRAVEL
November 5, 1989 | STEVE RICHARDSON, Richardson is a free-lance writer living in Columbia, S.C.
Four minutes, 30 seconds to liftoff. Mission control reports that the shuttle has switched to internal power. I radio confirmation as my eyes wander over the monitors on the flight deck. Outside the forward viewing ports, thin clouds drift through the serene blue of the Florida sky. Perfect launch weather. "Discovery? Repeat: Do you confirm oxygen vents closed? Over." What oxygen vents? Something to do with fuel for the main engine?
TRAVEL
July 1, 2001 | EILEEN OGINTZ
It's barely 6 a.m., overcast and chilly. We're too busy scrubbing the large stingray tank to notice. In the last 24 hours, the adults and kids in the group have helped build flamingo rookeries, prepared the manatees' lettuce meal and rescued an injured "whale" (an inflatable one). The bravest among us have taken the rigorous swimming test required for animal-trainer wannabes. It poured during the day, and our jeans got soaked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At T minus 2:00 and holding, the command came from Mission Control: "All positions are 'Go' for launch. Prepare to begin the countdown." Inside a million-dollar space shuttle simulator, computer screens flickered. A little girl in the commander's seat seemed to shrink in the cold glow of her instrument panels. "Roger," she said. The girl and five classmates from Oxnard Street Elementary School in North Hollywood traveled to U.S. Space Camp last month for astronaut training.
NEWS
November 27, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At T minus two minutes and holding, the command came from Mission Control. "All positions are 'Go' for launch. Prepare to begin the countdown." Inside a million-dollar space shuttle simulator, computer screens flickered. A little girl in the commander's seat seemed to shrink a little bit more in the cold glow of her instrument panels. "Roger," she said. Six classmates from Oxnard Street Elementary School in North Hollywood traveled to U.S. Space Camp this month for astronaut training.
NATIONAL
September 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
An anonymous buyer purchased Space Camp Florida and the Astronaut Hall of Fame for $100,000 at auction. The transaction was made through SC Realty of Birmingham, Ala. Brenda McMillan, a spokeswoman for the two Titusville attractions, said employees were told there was no possibility the sale could save the facilities in their current form. Sluggish attendance after an economic downturn and last year's terrorist attacks hindered Space Camp's ability to pay its debt, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Space may not be the final frontier for two teen-agers from Maclay Middle School. But space camp is on this summer's travel plans. Eighth-graders Alicia Ramos, 14, and Johnny Madrid, 13, will attend U.S. Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala., for a week in July. They earned the free trip with essays they wrote last winter in a contest sponsored by the Lockheed Corporate Management Assn. in Calabasas, part of the Lockheed Martin aerospace company, now based in Bethesda, Md.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1997 | DADE HAYES
Three teachers from the San Fernando and Antelope valleys are among 24 U.S. participants in this week's Space Academy for Educators in Florida. The program, one of several U.S. Space Camp programs for adults, began in 1992. It seeks to empower teachers with the ability to inspire students in math and science and give them classroom materials for developing new space- and science-based educational programs, organizers said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1996 | TIM MAY
In this battle of the brains, the sky's no limit. During the next few weeks, kids from five San Fernando Valley elementary schools will compete in a science fair with students from more than a dozen other schools across the city for a chance to win an expense-paid trip to the U.S. Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala. Each of the 22 schools that runs city-sponsored LA's BEST after-school enrichment programs will first sponsor its own science fair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At T minus 2:00 and holding, the command came from Mission Control: "All positions are 'Go' for launch. Prepare to begin the countdown." Inside a million-dollar space shuttle simulator, computer screens flickered. A little girl in the commander's seat seemed to shrink in the cold glow of her instrument panels. "Roger," she said. The girl and five classmates from Oxnard Street Elementary School in North Hollywood traveled to U.S. Space Camp last month for astronaut training.
NEWS
November 27, 1995 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At T minus two minutes and holding, the command came from Mission Control. "All positions are 'Go' for launch. Prepare to begin the countdown." Inside a million-dollar space shuttle simulator, computer screens flickered. A little girl in the commander's seat seemed to shrink a little bit more in the cold glow of her instrument panels. "Roger," she said. Six classmates from Oxnard Street Elementary School in North Hollywood traveled to U.S. Space Camp this month for astronaut training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1995 | MICHAEL ARKUSH
Space may not be the final frontier for two teen-agers from Maclay Middle School. But space camp is on this summer's travel plans. Eighth-graders Alicia Ramos, 14, and Johnny Madrid, 13, will attend U.S. Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala., for a week in July. They earned the free trip with essays they wrote last winter in a contest sponsored by the Lockheed Corporate Management Assn. in Calabasas, part of the Lockheed Martin aerospace company, now based in Bethesda, Md.
TRAVEL
November 5, 1989 | STEVE RICHARDSON, Richardson is a free-lance writer living in Columbia, S.C.
Four minutes, 30 seconds to liftoff. Mission control reports that the shuttle has switched to internal power. I radio confirmation as my eyes wander over the monitors on the flight deck. Outside the forward viewing ports, thin clouds drift through the serene blue of the Florida sky. Perfect launch weather. "Discovery? Repeat: Do you confirm oxygen vents closed? Over." What oxygen vents? Something to do with fuel for the main engine?
NEWS
August 2, 1998
Infoseek Corp. in Sunnyvale and U.S. Space Camp have invited kids 9 to 13 to offer names for the new international space station. Here are a few of the names submitted in the contest, which runs through Monday. (Kids can still submit names by e-mailing spacecamp.infoseek.com.) NASA promises to consider these names but does not guarantee it will use one. Torpido Peace Maker Spice Girls Anastasia Space Weasel New Hope One Sublime Stella Brotherhood Star Shadow Dudeship Vegas Better Than Mir
NEWS
January 31, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the classic tale of man vs. machine, John Henry, the powerful steel-drivin' man of legend, is pitted against the newly invented steam-powered automatic drill . . . and wins! Shortly thereafter, he collapses and dies of exhaustion. The legend of his physical prowess and skill, however, lives on. In honor of Black History Month, American Heroes & Legends presents his story in "John Henry," featuring narration by "Malcolm X's" Denzel Washington and music by B.B. King.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|