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U S Spying

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NATIONAL
October 25, 2013 | By David Horsey
President Obama has been busy this week taking calls from European leaders who seem really upset that the United States has been spying on them, perhaps to the point of tapping their cellphones. First, Obama heard from French President Francois Hollande. Hollande complained that documents leaked by Edward Snowden, the ex-NSA contractor who is now holed up in Moscow, showed that American intelligence agencies had gathered more than 70 million pieces of data from phone communications in France in just one 30-day period.
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NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Ken Dilianian
WASHINGTON - A new policy bars employees of U.S. spy agencies from providing reporters with "intelligence information," even if it is unclassified, without first getting official permission. Employees who violate the directive, which was issued on March 20 by James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, face disciplinary action or firing. Critics said the order adds to a climate in which intelligence agency employees face greater risk in trying to help the public understand what the government is doing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1997
Your article "Secret Messages by U.S. Spies Angers Envoys" (Dec. 24) is really nothing new. It is part of an ongoing effort by the State Department to establish its supremacy over all federal activities outside of the U.S. In 1961, President Kennedy declared that each American ambassador should take direct responsibility for all U.S. activities in the country of his assignment. As a young foreign service officer at the time, I was part of a small team that designed a mechanism to implement the president's directive.
WORLD
January 29, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON -- Insiders such as Edward Snowden who leak secrets about sensitive U.S. intelligence programs pose a "critical threat" to the United States, America's spy chiefs warned Congress in their annual report on global national security risks. For the first time, the threat of unauthorized disclosures from "trusted insiders" was ranked as the second greatest potential threat to the country, after cyberattacks but ahead of international terrorism, in the document prepared by the 16 agencies that make up the U.S. intelligence community.
WORLD
October 22, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico on Tuesday ramped up its protest over reports that the United States spied on numerous senior Mexican leaders, including the country's current and former presidents. Foreign Minister Jose Antonio Meade, speaking in Geneva, said Washington's explanations were insufficient. "Mexico insists ... there is no room for explanations," he said. "But, rather, a timely investigation with clear responsibilities and swift corrective measures. " A short time later, Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong went before TV cameras in Mexico City to announce that Mexico would investigate its officials, in addition to expecting Washington to look into its own possible transgressions.
WORLD
May 15, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW --The arrest and expulsion of a U.S. Embassy official this week for allegedly attempting, in a ham-handed way, to recruit a Russian intelligence officer was the second such case this year, Russian state television reported Wednesday. The earlier arrest took place in January, when an embassy official identified as Benjamin Dillon was arrested “in the attempt to recruit a special services officer,” Rossiya-1 TV reported in an interview with a man identified as an officer of the Federal Security Service, or FSB, the main successor agency to the Soviet KGB. The officer was not identified and his face was hidden in shadow.
WORLD
July 1, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON  - Europe turned up the pressure on the Obama administration Monday to respond to new allegations that the U.S. bugged the embassies of some of its long-standing allies and eavesdropped on European Union diplomats around the world. Leaders and officials of EU countries said that, if true, the reports of American spying on friendly nations were unacceptable and potentially damaging to relations across the Atlantic and to joint endeavors such as upcoming talks on a U.S.-EU free trade pact.
WORLD
September 2, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins and Tracy Wilkinson
SAO PAULO, Brazil --New documents leaked by former U.S. intelligence contractor Edward Snowden allege that Washington spied on the presidents of Mexico and Brazil, further complicating relations weeks before Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's state visit to the United States. After journalist Glenn Greenwald made the revelations on Brazil's popular Globo TV network Sunday night, Rousseff called an emergency meeting with advisors and her government summoned U.S. Ambassador Thomas Shannon to explain the new allegations, which came after earlier reports of spying led Brazil to demand answers from a visiting Secretary of State John F. Kerry last month.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2014 | By Ken Dilianian
WASHINGTON - A new policy bars employees of U.S. spy agencies from providing reporters with "intelligence information," even if it is unclassified, without first getting official permission. Employees who violate the directive, which was issued on March 20 by James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, face disciplinary action or firing. Critics said the order adds to a climate in which intelligence agency employees face greater risk in trying to help the public understand what the government is doing.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The expanding transatlantic scandal over U.S. eavesdropping on Europe's leaders and spying on its citizens has begun to strain intelligence relationships and diplomatic ties between allies that call each other best friends, according to diplomats and foreign policy experts. The cascade of embarrassing disclosures is not expected to upend one of President Obama's goals, a proposed transatlantic free-trade agreement that could generate billions of dollars a year, or halt cooperation on top security issues, such as efforts to curb Iran's nuclear program and contain the Syrian civil war. But the documents leaked by former National Security Agency computer specialist Edward Snowden, which on Wednesday exposed a joint U.S.-British spying operation on the Internet, have caused friction in multiple capitals and put the Obama administration on the defensive at home and abroad.
NATIONAL
January 17, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - President Obama proposed new safeguards for the government's vast surveillance of communications in the U.S. and abroad, adding more judicial review and disclosure requirements, but largely leaving in place programs that he said were needed to "remain vigilant in the face of threats. " In a speech Friday meant to quell concerns about U.S. spy practices, Obama said he recognized the unease many Americans have felt in the seven months since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden began to reveal details about the NSA's activities.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The expanding transatlantic scandal over U.S. eavesdropping on Europe's leaders and spying on its citizens has begun to strain intelligence relationships and diplomatic ties between allies that call each other best friends, according to diplomats and foreign policy experts. The cascade of embarrassing disclosures is not expected to upend one of President Obama's goals, a proposed transatlantic free-trade agreement that could generate billions of dollars a year, or halt cooperation on top security issues, such as efforts to curb Iran's nuclear program and contain the Syrian civil war. But the documents leaked by former National Security Agency computer specialist Edward Snowden, which on Wednesday exposed a joint U.S.-British spying operation on the Internet, have caused friction in multiple capitals and put the Obama administration on the defensive at home and abroad.
WORLD
October 25, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- Distilling their anger over reports of U.S. spying on European citizens and governments, including heads of state, European Union leaders are calling for a meeting with U.S. officials on the matter before the end of the year. In a statement issued by European Council President Herman van Rompuy and posted Friday on the EU's website, the leaders summarized their discussions Thursday on allegations of National Security Agency monitoring of phone traffic across Europe.    The statement, supported by leaders of all 28 EU member states, backed a proposal by France and Germany leading to call for direct talks with U.S. officials.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2013 | By David Horsey
President Obama has been busy this week taking calls from European leaders who seem really upset that the United States has been spying on them, perhaps to the point of tapping their cellphones. First, Obama heard from French President Francois Hollande. Hollande complained that documents leaked by Edward Snowden, the ex-NSA contractor who is now holed up in Moscow, showed that American intelligence agencies had gathered more than 70 million pieces of data from phone communications in France in just one 30-day period.
WORLD
October 24, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Declaring that “spying among friends is absolutely not OK,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Thursday that trust between her government and the Obama administration would need to be rebuilt after reports that U.S. intelligence agencies might have tapped her cellphone. Amid signs of anger from close allies over mass electronic surveillance, Germany's Foreign Ministry also summoned U.S. Ambassador John B. Emerson to make clear its displeasure. Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle said afterward that he had demanded ”these activities that have been reported will be comprehensively investigated.
WORLD
October 22, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico on Tuesday ramped up its protest over reports that the United States spied on numerous senior Mexican leaders, including the country's current and former presidents. Foreign Minister Jose Antonio Meade, speaking in Geneva, said Washington's explanations were insufficient. "Mexico insists ... there is no room for explanations," he said. "But, rather, a timely investigation with clear responsibilities and swift corrective measures. " A short time later, Interior Minister Miguel Angel Osorio Chong went before TV cameras in Mexico City to announce that Mexico would investigate its officials, in addition to expecting Washington to look into its own possible transgressions.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The U.S. intelligence community is nearing completion of its first detailed review of cyber-spying against American targets from abroad, including an attempt to calculate U.S. financial losses from hacker attacks based in China, officials said. The National Intelligence Estimate, the first involving cyber-espionage, also will seek to determine how large a role the Chinese government plays in directing or coordinating digital attacks aimed at stealing U.S. intellectual property, according to officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss a classified undertaking.
WORLD
June 1, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - China has arrested an employee of the Ministry of State Security on suspicion of spying for the United States, Hong Kong media reported Friday. The employee is said to be a 38-year-old man who was a secretary to Qiu Jin, the deputy minister of state security. He is alleged to have been recruited and trained by the CIA and was arrested sometime this year. "He helped to successfully penetrate the state security department and became aide to the vice minister … and was able to get his hands on core secrets of senior state officials," a report in the Hong Kong-based Oriental Daily said.
WORLD
September 2, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins and Tracy Wilkinson
SAO PAULO, Brazil --New documents leaked by former U.S. intelligence contractor Edward Snowden allege that Washington spied on the presidents of Mexico and Brazil, further complicating relations weeks before Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's state visit to the United States. After journalist Glenn Greenwald made the revelations on Brazil's popular Globo TV network Sunday night, Rousseff called an emergency meeting with advisors and her government summoned U.S. Ambassador Thomas Shannon to explain the new allegations, which came after earlier reports of spying led Brazil to demand answers from a visiting Secretary of State John F. Kerry last month.
OPINION
August 12, 2013 | Robert Meeropol
  Afew weeks from now, a military judge will probably sentence Bradley Manning to serve several decades in prison for violating the Espionage Act of 1917. I feel a kinship with him. My parents, Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, were convicted of violating the same act in 1951. They were executed two years later, when I was 6. That's only the beginning of my sense of connection with Manning. The prosecutors, and now the judge, have labeled his actions espionage, theft or other unsavory terms.
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