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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1987 | Staff writer Bob Schwartz compiled the Week in Review stories.
The U.S. Supreme Court agreed last week to review a state appellate court decision in an Orange County child-support dispute that prosecutors say makes it impossible for them to force many parents in the county to pay what they legally owe. The case that will be reviewed by the high court involves Philip and Alta Sue Feiock, who were divorced in 1976. Last year, Philip Feiock failed to make court-ordered $150 monthly child-support payments.
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Laura W. Brill
Last year's Proposition 8 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court changed the lives of many same-sex couples and their families in California for the better. But the political fallout from that decision is also having a profound and worrisome effect on the state's initiative process. The reason has to do with the nature of the court's action. The Supreme Court did not rule on the constitutionality of Proposition 8 itself. Rather, it decided an issue of standing, concluding that the initiative's backers had not been directly harmed by a lower-court ruling that the law was unconstitutional and that they therefore lacked standing to appeal that ruling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder and Joe Flint
The U.S. Supreme Court will decide the fate of Aereo. The high court said on Friday that it will hear arguments from the major broadcast networks that Aereo, a start-up that allows people to stream local television stations, violates copyright law and should be shut down.   Launched in 2012 and backed by media mogul Barry Diller, Aereo is available in 10 cities, including New York. It distributes broadcast signals via a tiny antenna and offers customers access to a cloud-based digital video recorder that holds up to 60 hours of content.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By David Horsey
America has seen some impressive winning streaks -- the Chicago Bulls with Michael Jordan, the New York Yankees for half the 20thcentury, Tiger Woods until his wife caught him with his putter on the wrong green -- - but few can surpass the string of wins being racked up by rich people. And now, thanks to the U.S. Supreme Court's conservatives, the super-wealthy can take another victory lap. On Wednesday, in a 5-4 ruling, the highest court in the land took one more big step toward eliminating all the campaign finance laws that have been enacted since the Watergate scandal in the 1970s.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Lincoln Savings & Loan boss Charles H. Keating Jr. won a final victory Monday before the U.S. Supreme Court, defeating attempts to reinstate his 1991 state court conviction on charges of swindling elderly investors. Without comment, the high court refused to reopen the case, leaving intact lower court rulings that Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Lance Ito had allowed a flawed prosecution.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal from the nation's television broadcasters and decide whether to shut down a new streaming service that sends shows to consumers via the Internet for a monthly fee. Aereo, a Brooklyn-based start-up distributor, uses small antennas to pick up over-the-air TV signals and allows a consumer to store them for later viewing. The company says its service is entirely legal since it uses the signals that a homeowner with an old-fashioned antenna could pick up as well.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger
Argentina has formally asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review an adverse appeals court ruling, the latest twist in the nation's decade-long fight concerning nearly $100 billion in defaulted debt. The South American nation filed the request, called a writ of certiorari, on Monday, according to Telam , Argentina's government-owned national news agency. The country has been litigating with a small group of creditors in U.S. courts over a small portion of the total debt, which Argentina stopped paying in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy and Paige St. John
Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday asked a justice on the U.S. Supreme Court to excuse California from orders by a three-judge panel to reduce prison crowding by releasing 9,600 inmates. The state argued that it needs time to appeal federal crowding orders and that to obey the orders would free thousands of inmates, “including violent and serious offenders,” according to the court filing. It was filed with Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy as the circuit justice. “We are confident that if the U.S. Supreme Court takes a look at the dramatic improvements in California's prison system, the justices will find we are providing constitutional care,” said Deborah Hoffman, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
OPINION
June 21, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
'He who pays the piper calls the tune" is a familiar piece of folk wisdom, but the Supreme Court rightly reaffirmed this week that it is bad constitutional law. At issue was a 2003 law under which the Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Agency for International Development have spent billions of dollars to contain the spread of HIV/AIDs. Nongovernmental organizations that deliver services could not spend federal funds "to promote or advocate the legalization or practice of prostitution or sex trafficking" - a requirement Congress was free to impose.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2009 | David G. Savage
In a case that could reshape the doctrine of separation of church and state, the Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether a cross to honor fallen soldiers can stand in a national preserve in California. The case will give the Roberts court its first chance to rule directly on the 1st Amendment's ban on "an establishment of religion."
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Airline customers complain about being mistreated on a daily basis, but Rabbi S. Binyomin Ginsberg took his grievance all of the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Unfortunately for Ginsberg, the court sided with Northwest Airlines on Wednesday. Ginsberg was not just a frequent flier with the airline, but also a frequent complainer. By 2008, Northwest declared it had lost patience with his protests and demands, and revoked his vaunted Platinum Elite membership. Ginsberg was outraged.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - One day after a federal judge struck down Texas' ban on same-sex marriage, the state on Thursday appealed the ruling. Texas is one of several conservative states, including Oklahoma and Virginia, in which federal judges have struck down bans on same-sex marriage. U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia in San Antonio ruled Wednesday that the ban was unconstitutional. He wrote that it deprived same-sex couples of due process and equal protection of the law, stigmatizing them and treating them differently from other couples.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Alene Tchekmedyian
The U.S. Supreme Court has denied the city of Burbank's request to review a lower court ruling that a former police detective was protected under the 1st Amendment when he reported alleged officer misconduct. The city filed a petition with the Supreme Court in November arguing that former Det. Angelo Dahlia was not protected by the 1st Amendment, and therefore could not sue the city for retaliation because as a police officer it was his professional duty to report crimes he witnessed, the Burbank Leader reported . The city's petition to review the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision was denied Monday, Supreme Court records show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By David G. Savage
A Los Angeles man who appealed his robbery conviction all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court -- arguing that police had no right to search his apartment in his absence, even though another resident gave consent -- lost his case Tuesday. The 6-3 ruling gives authorities more leeway to search homes without obtaining a warrant, even when there is no emergency. The case began in 2009 when Los Angeles police responded to reports of a street robbery near Venice Boulevard and Magnolia Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder and Joe Flint
The U.S. Supreme Court will decide the fate of Aereo. The high court said on Friday that it will hear arguments from the major broadcast networks that Aereo, a start-up that allows people to stream local television stations, violates copyright law and should be shut down.   Launched in 2012 and backed by media mogul Barry Diller, Aereo is available in 10 cities, including New York. It distributes broadcast signals via a tiny antenna and offers customers access to a cloud-based digital video recorder that holds up to 60 hours of content.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear an appeal from the nation's television broadcasters and decide whether to shut down a new streaming service that sends shows to consumers via the Internet for a monthly fee. Aereo, a Brooklyn-based start-up distributor, uses small antennas to pick up over-the-air TV signals and allows a consumer to store them for later viewing. The company says its service is entirely legal since it uses the signals that a homeowner with an old-fashioned antenna could pick up as well.
NATIONAL
January 27, 2009 | David G. Savage
The Supreme Court on Monday threw out a lawsuit by a Los Angeles man wrongfully convicted of murder and gave district attorneys a broad shield against being sued even if their management mistakes send an innocent person to prison. Thomas L. Goldstein, a former Marine convicted in a 1979 shooting in Long Beach, spent 24 years in prison largely on the word of a heroin addict who had worked as a jailhouse informant for police and prosecutors. Edward F.
NATIONAL
January 8, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
Same-sex marriage lasted in Utah for about 2 1/2 weeks. On Wednesday, the Utah governor's office directed state agencies to ignore the hundreds of gay marriages that were performed in the state after a federal judge struck down the state's ban Dec. 20. The move -- which has significant implications for Utah couples seeking to file joint tax returns or join their spouses' healthcare plans -- comes two days after the U.S. Supreme Court halted...
NATIONAL
December 26, 2013 | By David Lauter
Utah officials plan to ask the U.S. Supreme Court as early as Thursday to stop same-sex marriages in their state, a last-ditch effort to halt the parade of weddings since a federal judge struck down the state's ban on such unions. The state's petition would go to Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who has jurisdiction over cases coming from Utah and neighboring states. She could either decide the issue herself or refer it to her colleagues. If she denies the state's request, Utah officials could ask the full court to consider it. There's no deadline for the justices to make a decision, but they typically act quickly on such requests.
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