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BUSINESS
May 22, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Lucent Technologies and U.S. Venture Partners said they formed a company that will make products to help people prove their identities and protect themselves from impersonators through electronic fingerprinting technology. Veridicom Inc.'s first commercial product will be a postage-stamp-size fingerprint sensor used to retrieve information, authorize purchases or enter restricted areas.
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BUSINESS
May 22, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Lucent Technologies and U.S. Venture Partners said they formed a company that will make products to help people prove their identities and protect themselves from impersonators through electronic fingerprinting technology. Veridicom Inc.'s first commercial product will be a postage-stamp-size fingerprint sensor used to retrieve information, authorize purchases or enter restricted areas.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 2000
BuyNow, an Aliso Viejo provider of electronic commerce sales services to manufacturers, said Wednesday it has changed its name to Aqueduct Inc. and has picked up $15 million in private funding. Aqueduct said in a press release that the funding comes from venture capital firms U.S. Venture Partners in Menlo Park, and Softbank Technology Ventures in Mountain View. Both are first-time investors in Aqueduct.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2000 | Karen Alexander
PrintNation.com in Irvine, an electronic commerce site for the commercial printing industry, said Monday that it has received $25.5 million in venture capital funding. Lehman Brothers Venture Partners, Partech International, U.S. Venture Partners and Venrock Associates provided the funding. The company said the money will enable it to expand its staff and its marketing programs.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1987
Carter Hawley Hale Stores said Friday that Stewart M. Kasen, 47, president and CEO of the company's Thalhimer Bros. division, will become president and CEO of the Emporium Capwell unit on June 1, replacing David H. Folkman, who has resigned. Michael C. Weisberg, president of the Weinstock's division, will succeed Kasen as president and chief executive of Thalhimers, also effective June 1. The company said a replacement for Weisberg, 41, will be named later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stuart Moldaw, 81, who founded the Ross Dress for Less retail clothing chain and was a leading philanthropist in the San Francisco Bay Area, died May 24 from cancer in Atherton, Calif. Moldaw saw a niche in the affordable clothing market and started Ross, now one of the country's leading "off-price" retailers, in the early 1980s. The chain began with six stores in the Bay Area and now has more than 900 locations in 27 states. He was also a co-founder of U.S. Venture Partners, a Menlo Park, Calif.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1988 | Leslie Berkman, Times staff writer
Oncotech, an Irvine company that develops chemotherapy programs for cancer patients, completed a second round of venture-capital funding last week that will give it $2.5 million to spend on marketing and further clinical trials. Founded by two doctors in November, 1985, Oncotech received start-up grants amounting to about $150,000 from Memorial Hospital in Long Beach and the National Cancer Institute.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1987 | Mary Ann Galante, Times Staff Writer
R.H. Macy isn't even here yet, but it already has a competitor. Home Express, a chain of home accessories stores, made its grand entree into Southern California Friday by opening 55,000-square-foot stores in Buena Park and Huntington Beach. The chain's stores feature an art deco look and operate as a kind of combination discount house and specialty shop--or sort of warehouse chic. "We're like five specialty shops mixed into one," said Don Phillips, vice president of operations.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seems everyone wants in on the venture capital game these days: investment bankers, lawyers, college students--and now accountants. Arthur Andersen last week unveiled a $500-million venture fund targeting Internet start-ups, and, of course, much of the money will be invested in California, according to Paul Keglevic, managing partner of the company's Pacific region. "Everyone is trying to figure out what this new economy means and what it means to them," Keglevic said.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Nobody can quite agree on a unifying nickname for the area from Calabasas to Camarillo--whether "Conejo Valley computing complex" or "Highway 101 technology corridor"--but it's possibly the hottest place on the cutting edge of technology in the United States. Grouped around the advancing technology of computer networking, dozens of growing companies occupy an area straddling the Los Angeles and Ventura county line.
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