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NEWS
April 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Soviet army newspaper Red Star disclosed for the first time Sunday that when the Soviets downed Francis Gary Powers' U-2 spy plane 30 years ago, they also destroyed one of their own fighters that was pursuing the American plane. The U-2 was downed on May 1, 1960, disrupting a summit meeting 19 days later in Paris between President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev and forcing the cancellation of another summit planned for later that year.
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WORLD
March 12, 2003 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
Two simultaneous United Nations U-2 surveillance flights over Iraq briefly set off alarms Tuesday with the Iraqi government, which said it had not been properly informed. Both aircraft were recalled for safety reasons after a series of urgent phone calls, officials here said. Given the high state of military readiness in the region, a major conflagration might have erupted if Iraq had fired at either of the American-piloted spy planes. U.S.
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NEWS
January 17, 1992 | Associated Press
The body of the pilot of an American U-2 spy plane lost at sea near the border separating North and South Korea was recovered Thursday by a South Korean navy vessel, the Pentagon announced. The pilot was identified as Air Force Capt. James M. McGregor, 33, of Flagstaff, Ariz. He was the only crew member aboard. McGregor was assigned to Detachment 2 of the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, based at Beale Air Force Base, Calif., said Pentagon spokesman Pete Williams.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2002 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly five decades after the first U-2 spy plane took flight, an updated version with the latest equipment sped down the runway in Palmdale recently to begin another century as America's eye in the sky. But before it could take flight, it needed a little help from a piece of relatively unsophisticated equipment: a Chevrolet Camaro.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | Reuters
Iraq has warned the United Nations to call off its U-2 flights over its territory, precipitating a new confrontation with the Security Council. The Iraqi warning, which implied it could no longer guarantee the security of the flights, prompted the Security Council to call emergency consultations Friday to draw up a statement rejecting Iraq's demand and perceived threats. The warning from Iraq came in a letter to the United Nations released Friday.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American U-2 spy plane, conducting what the Pentagon described as a "routine mission" over the Korean Peninsula, disappeared in the waters off South Korea, the Defense Department said Wednesday. The unarmed reconnaissance plane, which can be equipped to gather photographic intelligence or to eavesdrop on communications, dropped off radar screens and broke off radio contact with its home base of Osan Air Base in South Korea at 8:30 a.m. PST Wednesday.
NEWS
November 12, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. officials seemed pleased to report this week that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein failed to make good on his threat to shoot at an American U-2 spy plane flying over his country. But they may have been a little disappointed too. Despite Hussein's threat--and the U.S. bluster--there is almost no chance that aging Iraqi weaponry could hit the highflying spy plane, experts say. And if Iraq had tried, the result could have been a diplomatic windfall for the United States.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Iraq fired a surface-to-air missile at an American U-2 spy plane over southern Iraq, U.S. officials said. The U.S. plane was not hit. The crew of the U.S. aircraft was part of Operation Southern Watch patrolling a "no-fly" zone, Pentagon spokesman Lt. David Gai said. The attack came less than a week after the crew of a Navy surveillance aircraft flying in Kuwaiti airspace reported seeing the plume of a surface-to-air missile apparently fired from inside Iraq. That plane also was not hit.
WORLD
March 12, 2003 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
Two simultaneous United Nations U-2 surveillance flights over Iraq briefly set off alarms Tuesday with the Iraqi government, which said it had not been properly informed. Both aircraft were recalled for safety reasons after a series of urgent phone calls, officials here said. Given the high state of military readiness in the region, a major conflagration might have erupted if Iraq had fired at either of the American-piloted spy planes. U.S.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2002 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly five decades after the first U-2 spy plane took flight, an updated version with the latest equipment sped down the runway in Palmdale recently to begin another century as America's eye in the sky. But before it could take flight, it needed a little help from a piece of relatively unsophisticated equipment: a Chevrolet Camaro.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Iraq fired a surface-to-air missile at an American U-2 spy plane over southern Iraq, U.S. officials said. The U.S. plane was not hit. The crew of the U.S. aircraft was part of Operation Southern Watch patrolling a "no-fly" zone, Pentagon spokesman Lt. David Gai said. The attack came less than a week after the crew of a Navy surveillance aircraft flying in Kuwaiti airspace reported seeing the plume of a surface-to-air missile apparently fired from inside Iraq. That plane also was not hit.
NEWS
November 12, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. officials seemed pleased to report this week that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein failed to make good on his threat to shoot at an American U-2 spy plane flying over his country. But they may have been a little disappointed too. Despite Hussein's threat--and the U.S. bluster--there is almost no chance that aging Iraqi weaponry could hit the highflying spy plane, experts say. And if Iraq had tried, the result could have been a diplomatic windfall for the United States.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | Reuters
Iraq has warned the United Nations to call off its U-2 flights over its territory, precipitating a new confrontation with the Security Council. The Iraqi warning, which implied it could no longer guarantee the security of the flights, prompted the Security Council to call emergency consultations Friday to draw up a statement rejecting Iraq's demand and perceived threats. The warning from Iraq came in a letter to the United Nations released Friday.
NEWS
January 17, 1992 | Associated Press
The body of the pilot of an American U-2 spy plane lost at sea near the border separating North and South Korea was recovered Thursday by a South Korean navy vessel, the Pentagon announced. The pilot was identified as Air Force Capt. James M. McGregor, 33, of Flagstaff, Ariz. He was the only crew member aboard. McGregor was assigned to Detachment 2 of the 9th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing, based at Beale Air Force Base, Calif., said Pentagon spokesman Pete Williams.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American U-2 spy plane, conducting what the Pentagon described as a "routine mission" over the Korean Peninsula, disappeared in the waters off South Korea, the Defense Department said Wednesday. The unarmed reconnaissance plane, which can be equipped to gather photographic intelligence or to eavesdrop on communications, dropped off radar screens and broke off radio contact with its home base of Osan Air Base in South Korea at 8:30 a.m. PST Wednesday.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Soviet army newspaper Red Star disclosed for the first time Sunday that when the Soviets downed Francis Gary Powers' U-2 spy plane 30 years ago, they also destroyed one of their own fighters that was pursuing the American plane. The U-2 was downed on May 1, 1960, disrupting a summit meeting 19 days later in Paris between President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev and forcing the cancellation of another summit planned for later that year.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1993 | JONATHAN GOLD
In his memoir "U & I," author Nicholson Baker writes obsessively, at book length, about his relationship with novelist John Updike, their intellectual confluence, the space Updike takes up in Baker's life . . . except there is no relationship--Updike doesn't know that Baker exists, and Baker, in fact, has barely read Updike's work.
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