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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
There's something inherently dramatic about submarines, there just is. What could be more stirring than heroic (not to mention handsome) young men under intense mental and physical stresses trapped in dangerous, claustrophobic surroundings? When you throw in those unnerving Klaxons sounding without warning and the captain screaming, "Dive! Dive! Dive!" it's hard to go too far wrong.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2000
Three new films couldn't sink Universal's action-adventure "U-571," which held on to the top position on the box-office chart. The World War II sub thriller took in $12.2 million in its second week in release for a 10-day total of $38.1 million. Placing second was the new family comedy "The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas," which managed a $10.5-million opening. The first "Flintstones" movie brought in $29.7 million its first weekend in May 1994.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2000
Three new films couldn't sink Universal's action-adventure "U-571," which held on to the top position on the box-office chart. The World War II sub thriller took in $12.2 million in its second week in release for a 10-day total of $38.1 million. Placing second was the new family comedy "The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas," which managed a $10.5-million opening. The first "Flintstones" movie brought in $29.7 million its first weekend in May 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2000 | From Times wire services
The submarine thriller "U-571" ruled the box office waves for the second consecutive weekend, leaving three new movies in its wake, according to studio estimates issued Sunday. The World War II-set drama, which stars Matthew McConaughey, grossed about $12.3 million for the Friday-to-Sunday period, taking its 10-day total to $38.2 million. The film was released by Seagram Co. Ltd.'s Universal Pictures, which also had the No.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS
A gripping World War II submarine action film easily defeated the competition over the weekend as director Jonathan Mostow's "U-571" grossed $19.6 million at the box office. "U-571" became the fourth-highest-opening film of the year behind "Scream 3" ($34.7 million), "Erin Brockovich" ($28.1 million) and "Mission to Mars" ($22.8 million).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2000
So "U-571" director Jonathan Mostow "incurred the displeasure of her majesty's navy" by using Americans to capture an Enigma machine on a German sub ("WWII at Sea, as Fought on the Screen," by Lawrence Suid, April 25). This is somewhat hypocritical, since films about the British navy have been especially reluctant to acknowledge the efforts of her allies in World War II. Norwegian resistance in the sinking of the Bismarck and Tirpitz, and the part Americans played in Ultra secrets and radar development, have been, if not ignored, severely downplayed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2000 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sky was appropriately cloudy for the Monday night premiere of Universal Pictures' World War II submarine adventure film "U-571." Stars Matthew McConaughey, Jon Bon Jovi, Bill Paxton, Erik Palladino, Jack Noseworthy and Harvey Keitel traipsed the soggy red carpet to the delight of dozens of fans, most of whom seemed to be there for a glimpse of rocker-turned-actor Bon Jovi.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2000 | LAWRENCE SUID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Looking for a way to create a World War II submarine drama that would "appeal to modern audiences," director Jonathan Mostow found it in the story of the sailors who risked their lives to snatch an Enigma decoder from a U-boat and turned the tide of the war in the North Atlantic. Mostow achieved his goal--with considerable flair--but in the process of translating real events to the screen, he rewrote history to make it more appealing to American audiences in the post-Cold War era.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2000 | From Times wire services
The submarine thriller "U-571" ruled the box office waves for the second consecutive weekend, leaving three new movies in its wake, according to studio estimates issued Sunday. The World War II-set drama, which stars Matthew McConaughey, grossed about $12.3 million for the Friday-to-Sunday period, taking its 10-day total to $38.2 million. The film was released by Seagram Co. Ltd.'s Universal Pictures, which also had the No.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like airplanes backed up for miles on a runway, the upcoming summer movie schedule is so crowded that something had to give. As Fox senior executive Tom Sherak warns: "There's no room in summer." So to avoid major collisions, the studios are leaping backward into the normally slower month of April to give some high-profile films a chance to establish themselves before the real summer tumult commences. The summer movie preseason kicks off this week and goes into high gear by the end of the month.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2000
So "U-571" director Jonathan Mostow "incurred the displeasure of her majesty's navy" by using Americans to capture an Enigma machine on a German sub ("WWII at Sea, as Fought on the Screen," by Lawrence Suid, April 25). This is somewhat hypocritical, since films about the British navy have been especially reluctant to acknowledge the efforts of her allies in World War II. Norwegian resistance in the sinking of the Bismarck and Tirpitz, and the part Americans played in Ultra secrets and radar development, have been, if not ignored, severely downplayed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS
A gripping World War II submarine action film easily defeated the competition over the weekend as director Jonathan Mostow's "U-571" grossed $19.6 million at the box office. "U-571" became the fourth-highest-opening film of the year behind "Scream 3" ($34.7 million), "Erin Brockovich" ($28.1 million) and "Mission to Mars" ($22.8 million).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2000 | LAWRENCE SUID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Looking for a way to create a World War II submarine drama that would "appeal to modern audiences," director Jonathan Mostow found it in the story of the sailors who risked their lives to snatch an Enigma decoder from a U-boat and turned the tide of the war in the North Atlantic. Mostow achieved his goal--with considerable flair--but in the process of translating real events to the screen, he rewrote history to make it more appealing to American audiences in the post-Cold War era.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
The submarine flick "U-571" surfaced as the new box-office leader in its opening weekend, sending another military drama sinking into third place, according to studio estimates Sunday. "U-571," a World War II yarn starring Matthew McConaughey and Harvey Keitel, took in $20.3 million for the weekend. Its success helped push "Rules of Engagement," the military court drama starring Samuel L. Jackson and Tommy Lee Jones, down two slots with $8 million after two weeks as the No. 1 movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
There's something inherently dramatic about submarines, there just is. What could be more stirring than heroic (not to mention handsome) young men under intense mental and physical stresses trapped in dangerous, claustrophobic surroundings? When you throw in those unnerving Klaxons sounding without warning and the captain screaming, "Dive! Dive! Dive!" it's hard to go too far wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We arrive at the naval submarine base in San Diego at the crack of dawn in rented stretch limousines, a motley crew consisting of the director and two actors from the new Universal Pictures submarine film, "U-571," a TV crew from "Access Hollywood" and assorted journalists, photographers and studio publicists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2000 | From Associated Press
The submarine flick "U-571" surfaced as the new box-office leader in its opening weekend, sending another military drama sinking into third place, according to studio estimates Sunday. "U-571," a World War II yarn starring Matthew McConaughey and Harvey Keitel, took in $20.3 million for the weekend. Its success helped push "Rules of Engagement," the military court drama starring Samuel L. Jackson and Tommy Lee Jones, down two slots with $8 million after two weeks as the No. 1 movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2000 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We arrive at the naval submarine base in San Diego at the crack of dawn in rented stretch limousines, a motley crew consisting of the director and two actors from the new Universal Pictures submarine film, "U-571," a TV crew from "Access Hollywood" and assorted journalists, photographers and studio publicists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2000 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sky was appropriately cloudy for the Monday night premiere of Universal Pictures' World War II submarine adventure film "U-571." Stars Matthew McConaughey, Jon Bon Jovi, Bill Paxton, Erik Palladino, Jack Noseworthy and Harvey Keitel traipsed the soggy red carpet to the delight of dozens of fans, most of whom seemed to be there for a glimpse of rocker-turned-actor Bon Jovi.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2000 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like airplanes backed up for miles on a runway, the upcoming summer movie schedule is so crowded that something had to give. As Fox senior executive Tom Sherak warns: "There's no room in summer." So to avoid major collisions, the studios are leaping backward into the normally slower month of April to give some high-profile films a chance to establish themselves before the real summer tumult commences. The summer movie preseason kicks off this week and goes into high gear by the end of the month.
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