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WORLD
January 21, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The highest court in the United Arab Emirates on Tuesday convicted 30 Islamists of establishing an "international branch" of the banned Muslim Brotherhood in the wealthy Persian Gulf federation, a case slammed by rights advocates as politically motivated and marred by a catalog of legal abuses. Ten Emiratis and 20 Egyptians were given sentences ranging from three months to five years. There is no right to appeal. Charges included allegations that the men stole classified documents, operated a secret organization and collected aid and donations without government permission, according to the charge list and sentencing details published by Gulf News.
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WORLD
January 21, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The highest court in the United Arab Emirates on Tuesday convicted 30 Islamists of establishing an "international branch" of the banned Muslim Brotherhood in the wealthy Persian Gulf federation, a case slammed by rights advocates as politically motivated and marred by a catalog of legal abuses. Ten Emiratis and 20 Egyptians were given sentences ranging from three months to five years. There is no right to appeal. Charges included allegations that the men stole classified documents, operated a secret organization and collected aid and donations without government permission, according to the charge list and sentencing details published by Gulf News.
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WORLD
February 22, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
The United Arab Emirates Foreign Ministry issued a statement Sunday saying it was "deeply concerned" that passports from countries whose "nationals currently enjoy preferential visa waivers" were used in the recent assassination of a senior Hamas figure. The statement was the most high-level comment by Dubai or UAE authorities on the January slaying of senior Hamas figure Mahmoud Mabhouh, which some allege was carried out by the Israeli spy agency Mossad. It suggested that the increasingly powerful Persian Gulf confederation was trying to put heavy pressure on European officials -- whose nationals are able to travel freely through the UAE commercial powerhouses of Dubai and Abu Dhabi -- to help it hunt down the perpetrators of the killing.
WORLD
July 9, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali and Paul Richter
CAIRO -- Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates on Tuesday announced a total of $8 billion in economic aid to help shore up Egypt's military-backed interim leaders after Islamist President Mohamed Morsi was removed in a coup last week. The Persian Gulf economic giants had eyed the Morsi government warily, worried that the rise of his Muslim Brotherhood movement would bolster Islamic extremists in their own countries. Saudi Arabia's $5-billion pledge and the Emirates' $3 billion will provide Egypt a much-needed economic lifeline, but analysts said they also would diminish the United States' already shrinking influence with the new government in Cairo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2000
The Taliban's military success in Afghanistan is alarming for anyone concerned with human rights, to say nothing of peace and stability in the region (Oct. 2). Yet Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the UAE and Bahrain, our good "buddies," all have non-democratically elected leaders, and most of these Muslim countries are considered among the most repressive regimes in the world. Their treatment of half their population--women--is especially reprehensible. JENNIFER FLOWERS Laguna Beach
WORLD
March 4, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Ninety-four people accused of trying to seize power went on trial Monday in the United Arab Emirates, in a tightly guarded hearing criticized by human rights groups. The suspects allegedly launched an organization that claimed to promote “the teaching and virtues of Islam, while their undeclared aims were, in fact, to seek to seize power,” Atty. Gen. Salem Saeed Kubaish told the UAE's national news agency in January. Kubaish said the group tried to turn public opinion against the government by falsely smearing the state and sought financial help and advice from the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood.
OPINION
February 28, 2006
Your editorial, "Boxer's rebellion" (Feb. 26), completely ignored the nonpartisan response to this latest, potentially tragic mistake by the Bush administration. The United Arab Emirates (a "key ally") had many connections with the 9/11 attackers. It is ridiculous that President Bush compares Britain with the UAE. If anything, Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) and our representatives in Congress have been incredibly lax in holding the administration responsible for the numerous mistakes of the last five years.
WORLD
April 21, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
JERUSALEM -- Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel arrived in Israel on Sunday to begin a weeklong tour of the Middle East as the region grapples with the worsening civil war in Syria and the stubborn nuclear threat from Iran. Making his first visit to the region as Pentagon chief, Hagel is seeking to demonstrate solidarity between the U.S. and Israel -- allies whose relations have been strained over how to deter Iran from pursuing a nuclear weapon. Israel is said to be mulling unilateral military action against Iran's nuclear facilities, a move that Obama administration officials consider extremely risky.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
The longstanding sibling rivalry between the two biggest members of the United Arab Emirates, always complex, has taken a remarkable turn in recent months. For years, as its neighbor on the Persian Gulf, Dubai, engaged in a frenzy of construction and deal-making, Abu Dhabi -- the capital of the UAE and owner of its deepest petroleum reserves -- was mostly content to keep its ambition in check.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2008 | Barbara Surk, The Associated Press
This Persian Gulf desert nation, one of the world's most environmentally unfriendly with its ubiquitous air conditioning, swimming pools and sport utility vehicles, may be looking to redeem itself. It has begun building what it calls the world's first zero-carbon city. Environmentalists say the new city -- which will recycle waste and water and be powered mainly by solar energy -- is a nice idea, but the Emirates shouldn't stop there. "Every little bit helps," said Jonathan Loh, a British biologist who co-authored a 2006 World Wildlife Fund report that measured consumption by nations around the world.
WORLD
April 21, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
JERUSALEM -- Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel arrived in Israel on Sunday to begin a weeklong tour of the Middle East as the region grapples with the worsening civil war in Syria and the stubborn nuclear threat from Iran. Making his first visit to the region as Pentagon chief, Hagel is seeking to demonstrate solidarity between the U.S. and Israel -- allies whose relations have been strained over how to deter Iran from pursuing a nuclear weapon. Israel is said to be mulling unilateral military action against Iran's nuclear facilities, a move that Obama administration officials consider extremely risky.
WORLD
March 4, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Ninety-four people accused of trying to seize power went on trial Monday in the United Arab Emirates, in a tightly guarded hearing criticized by human rights groups. The suspects allegedly launched an organization that claimed to promote “the teaching and virtues of Islam, while their undeclared aims were, in fact, to seek to seize power,” Atty. Gen. Salem Saeed Kubaish told the UAE's national news agency in January. Kubaish said the group tried to turn public opinion against the government by falsely smearing the state and sought financial help and advice from the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood.
WORLD
August 2, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Citing concerns that terrorists and criminals could exploit telecommunications traffic in the Arab world's financial hub, the United Arab Emirates said Sunday that it would suspend e-mail and Web browsing on BlackBerry services beginning in October. Shortly after the UAE's announcement, media reports quoted officials in Saudi Arabia as saying the kingdom would take similar steps to restrict features on the popular BlackBerry smartphones. The decisions could affect up to 1 million BlackBerry users in the region and possibly upset networking for businesspeople and tourists.
WORLD
February 22, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
The United Arab Emirates Foreign Ministry issued a statement Sunday saying it was "deeply concerned" that passports from countries whose "nationals currently enjoy preferential visa waivers" were used in the recent assassination of a senior Hamas figure. The statement was the most high-level comment by Dubai or UAE authorities on the January slaying of senior Hamas figure Mahmoud Mabhouh, which some allege was carried out by the Israeli spy agency Mossad. It suggested that the increasingly powerful Persian Gulf confederation was trying to put heavy pressure on European officials -- whose nationals are able to travel freely through the UAE commercial powerhouses of Dubai and Abu Dhabi -- to help it hunt down the perpetrators of the killing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
The longstanding sibling rivalry between the two biggest members of the United Arab Emirates, always complex, has taken a remarkable turn in recent months. For years, as its neighbor on the Persian Gulf, Dubai, engaged in a frenzy of construction and deal-making, Abu Dhabi -- the capital of the UAE and owner of its deepest petroleum reserves -- was mostly content to keep its ambition in check.
WORLD
May 12, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Doctors are investigating whether dozens of girls were poisoned at a high school in northern Afghanistan after 61 students were taken to the hospital because of sudden illness, officials said. Dr. Khalil Farangi said the 61 girls and one teacher from a school in Parwan, one province north of Kabul, complained of irritability, weeping and confusion. Several girls also passed out. Officials sent blood samples to Kabul and to the U.S. military base in Bagram for tests.
WORLD
August 2, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Citing concerns that terrorists and criminals could exploit telecommunications traffic in the Arab world's financial hub, the United Arab Emirates said Sunday that it would suspend e-mail and Web browsing on BlackBerry services beginning in October. Shortly after the UAE's announcement, media reports quoted officials in Saudi Arabia as saying the kingdom would take similar steps to restrict features on the popular BlackBerry smartphones. The decisions could affect up to 1 million BlackBerry users in the region and possibly upset networking for businesspeople and tourists.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
Tele-Communications Inc. said Wednesday that it offered to buy the remaining 46% of United Artists Entertainment Co. shares it does not own in a deal that would be worth more than $1 billion. The transaction would consolidate two of the nation's biggest cable-TV system operators--TCI ranks first with about 8.5 million basic subscribers, including UAE's 2.7-million. In a letter to the UAE board, TCI President and Chief Executive John C.
WORLD
December 16, 2008 | Borzou Daragahi, Daragahi is a Times staff writer.
The United States and the United Arab Emirates have hammered out a nuclear cooperation deal that would bring U.S. atomic technology and know-how to a site less than a hundred miles from Iran's shores, an envoy from the Persian Gulf monarchy confirmed Monday to state media. The deal, if implemented, would be the first of its kind involving the U.S. and an Arab country, experts said.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2008 | Barbara Surk, The Associated Press
This Persian Gulf desert nation, one of the world's most environmentally unfriendly with its ubiquitous air conditioning, swimming pools and sport utility vehicles, may be looking to redeem itself. It has begun building what it calls the world's first zero-carbon city. Environmentalists say the new city -- which will recycle waste and water and be powered mainly by solar energy -- is a nice idea, but the Emirates shouldn't stop there. "Every little bit helps," said Jonathan Loh, a British biologist who co-authored a 2006 World Wildlife Fund report that measured consumption by nations around the world.
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