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Ub Iwerks

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MAGAZINE
June 9, 2002
Wow! What a shock! Ub Iwerks, not Walt Disney, created Mickey Mouse ("The Obscure History of Mickey Mouse," by Barbara Tannenbaum, May 12)! Yet the Disney Studios gave Iwerks' granddaughter an annual budget of $288,000 to make a documentary to this effect. Why would they do this? Guilt? Auriel Douglas Santa Monica
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2011 | By Charles Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When the extraordinary success of "Steamboat Willie" made Walt Disney an overnight sensation in 1928, he'd already spent nearly a decade working in animation. During those years, he'd had successes and failures, as Timothy S. Susanin recounts in great detail in his new book, "Walt Before Mickey. " In 1919, while Disney and his friend Ub Iwerks were working as commercial artists in Kansas City, they taught themselves animation. Disney began exploring the medium with the "Newman Laugh-O-Grams," a series of one-minute topical cartoons for local theater owner Frank Newman.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1999
Three special programs will salute three important but lesser-known animation figures this month. * On Friday, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art will present "A Taste of Tashlin: Early Hollywood Cartoons." Although Frank Tashlin is known for directing such live-action comedies as "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?," he began his career in animation. He worked at Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If you're a documentarian, you know that while it's a great honor to make the academy's shortlist for best documentary short, it's almost impossible to get anyone in the media to write about your movie, since they're almost totally obsessed with handicapping the ups and downs of the various actor and best picture races. But thanks to the Canadian government, in particular Alberta's minister of culture, Leslie Iwerks' documentary short "Downstream" has a shot at a little notoriety, which is just what a doc-short needs to steal a little attention from the endless speculation about Kate Winslet's Oscar chances.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2011 | By Charles Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When the extraordinary success of "Steamboat Willie" made Walt Disney an overnight sensation in 1928, he'd already spent nearly a decade working in animation. During those years, he'd had successes and failures, as Timothy S. Susanin recounts in great detail in his new book, "Walt Before Mickey. " In 1919, while Disney and his friend Ub Iwerks were working as commercial artists in Kansas City, they taught themselves animation. Disney began exploring the medium with the "Newman Laugh-O-Grams," a series of one-minute topical cartoons for local theater owner Frank Newman.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
If you're a documentarian, you know that while it's a great honor to make the academy's shortlist for best documentary short, it's almost impossible to get anyone in the media to write about your movie, since they're almost totally obsessed with handicapping the ups and downs of the various actor and best picture races. But thanks to the Canadian government, in particular Alberta's minister of culture, Leslie Iwerks' documentary short "Downstream" has a shot at a little notoriety, which is just what a doc-short needs to steal a little attention from the endless speculation about Kate Winslet's Oscar chances.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2001 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iwerks Entertainment Inc., a maker of giant-screen theaters and theme park attractions, said Tuesday it will be acquired by a Canadian company for about $2.2 million in cash. Although the value of the deal is small, Burbank-based Iwerks has been an influential company in the theme park and attraction industry, supplying the 3-D projection system used in the elaborate Terminator rides at Universal Studios parks in Hollywood and Florida.
MAGAZINE
May 12, 2002 | BARBARA TANNENBAUM
On a wind-swept morning, Leslie Iwerks drives her white Jeep Cherokee down San Fernando Road on the outskirts of Burbank. She navigates surface streets for a 10-minute trip between Iwerks Entertainment and the Walt Disney Studios. By L.A. standards, it is a commute barely worth mentioning. For Iwerks, the four-mile journey symbolizes a lifetime of work. Make that two lifetimes. Her grandfather occupies an obscure niche in pop culture history, a position that Iwerks has long wanted to change.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Walt Disney's key group of animators and the designer of Mickey Mouse will be honored in a special ceremony Wednesday morning at Disney studios in Burbank. Walt Disney Co. Chairman Michael Eisner and vice chairman Roy E. Disney will present the Disney Legends Award for "significant creative contributions to the Disney legacy" to the animators, known as the "Nine Old Men," and to Ub Iwerks, Mickey's designer.
OPINION
August 28, 2008
Re "Whose mouse is it anyway?," Column One, Aug. 22 One interesting side note is that the character of Steamboat Willie is cribbed from Buster Keaton's Steamboat Bill Jr. If you see the two together, it's obvious. I don't mean to imply that Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks necessarily committed a copyright violation -- there may be just enough original content in Steamboat Willie to avoid that humiliation. Still, since I learned the origin, it has always struck me that Walt Disney Co. has been extremely cynical about intellectual property.
MAGAZINE
June 9, 2002
Wow! What a shock! Ub Iwerks, not Walt Disney, created Mickey Mouse ("The Obscure History of Mickey Mouse," by Barbara Tannenbaum, May 12)! Yet the Disney Studios gave Iwerks' granddaughter an annual budget of $288,000 to make a documentary to this effect. Why would they do this? Guilt? Auriel Douglas Santa Monica
MAGAZINE
May 12, 2002 | BARBARA TANNENBAUM
On a wind-swept morning, Leslie Iwerks drives her white Jeep Cherokee down San Fernando Road on the outskirts of Burbank. She navigates surface streets for a 10-minute trip between Iwerks Entertainment and the Walt Disney Studios. By L.A. standards, it is a commute barely worth mentioning. For Iwerks, the four-mile journey symbolizes a lifetime of work. Make that two lifetimes. Her grandfather occupies an obscure niche in pop culture history, a position that Iwerks has long wanted to change.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2001 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iwerks Entertainment Inc., a maker of giant-screen theaters and theme park attractions, said Tuesday it will be acquired by a Canadian company for about $2.2 million in cash. Although the value of the deal is small, Burbank-based Iwerks has been an influential company in the theme park and attraction industry, supplying the 3-D projection system used in the elaborate Terminator rides at Universal Studios parks in Hollywood and Florida.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1999
Three special programs will salute three important but lesser-known animation figures this month. * On Friday, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art will present "A Taste of Tashlin: Early Hollywood Cartoons." Although Frank Tashlin is known for directing such live-action comedies as "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?," he began his career in animation. He worked at Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1999 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Hand Behind the Mouse: The Ub Iwerks Story," a documentary by the artist's granddaughter, Leslie Iwerks, which opens today at the El Capitan Theater for a one-week run, offers viewers a rare look at one of the unsung giants of animation and film technology. Born in 1901, Iwerks was still a teenager in Kansas City when he met another ambitious young artist, Walt Disney. The two friends taught themselves animation at night, while working as commercial artists.
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